1958 Bobby Fischer Newspaper Articles Archive

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New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, January 01, 1958 - Page 34

Reshevsky Held To Draw In Chess
Grand Master Shares Point With Fischer, Leader in U.S. Title Tourney
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the national open champion, yesterday held Samuel Reshevsky, international grand master, to a draw in their adjourned game from the third round of the United States championship for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Fifty-seven moves were recorded. Until the last Reshevsky tried to turn to account what he deemed to be a slight advantage. However, Fischer, as skillful in end-game play as in mid-game strategy, playing with remarkable confidence. It was the 14-year-old's third draw in the tournament, the others having been with Herbert Seidman in the second round and Hans Berliner in the sixth.
Reshevsky had drawn only once, with Sidney Bernstein in the seventh round. The respective places of the leaders in the standing remained unchanged, Fischer topping the list with 7½—1½ and Reshevsky coming next with 6—1.
Tonight Reshevsky will play his postponed first-round game with Atilio Di Camillo of Philadelphia. The grand master also has pending a ninth-round encounter with Hans Berliner of Washington.
The Reshevsky-Fischer score:

Reshevsky Held To Draw In Chess

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 02, 1958 - Page 4

Lead Shared by Bobby Fischer, National Open Champion
At the end of eight rounds of the U.S. Chess Championship at the Marshall Club in New York, the lead was more or less shared by youthful Bobby Fischer, the national open champion, and Samuel Reshevsky, only active American grandmaster.
With two adjourned games to complete (one with Fischer, which appeared drawish), Reshevsky had a score of 5½-½. Fischer, with only his game against Reshevsky adjourned, had a mark of 6-1. Both were definitely ahead of the third and fourth men in the standings, William Lombardy (5½-2½) and James T. Sherwin (5-2).

Lead Shared by Bobby Fischer, National Open Champion

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, January 2, 1958 - Page 40

Reshevsky Takes U.S. Chess Lead
Scores Over Di Camillio and Berliner to Go Ahead of Fischer in 9th Round
Samuel Reshevsky, an international grand master, last night took the lead in the United States championship tournament at the Manhattan Chess Club. He won two games, including the one with Atilio Di Camillo of Philadelphia, deferred from the first round.
With the black pieces, Reshevsky chose the Sicilian defense. He won a pawn on the eighteenth move and forced his opponent's resignation after forty moves.
Reshevsky supplanted Bobby Fischer, the national open champion, in the lead when he won his ninth-round game with Hans Berliner, of Washington for an 8-1 score.
The grand master, who had a distinct advantage at the time of adjournment, suggested that he was able to demonstrate a winning line in every variation. He did so upon his opponent's invitation and the analysis led to the resignation of Berliner.
Fischer is second at 7½—1½. William Lombardy, 6—3, is third.

Reshevsky Takes U.S. Chess Lead

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, January 3, 1958 - Page 18

Reshevsky Lags In Chess Contest
Sherwin Expected to Win on Resumption—Fischer and Lombardy in Keen Match
Samuel Reshevsky, leading in the United States championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy, was still undefeated in the tenth round at the Manhattan Chess Club last night. But after a five-hour session and forty moves had been recorded, his opponent, James T. Sherwin, was regarded as fairly certain to win upon the resumption of play.
Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion, a close second in the standing, was not too happy, either. At one stage, he had William Lombardy on the run, but permitted him to slip away. Fischer was a pawn ahead, also after a five-hour session, but Lombardy's forces were strongly posted. Opinions differed widely as to the probable outcome upon resumption.
Reshevsky retained his lead with a score of 8—1. Fischer was at 7½—1½, Lombardy 6—3 and Sherwin 5½—2½.
Both Reshevsky and Fischer resorted to the King's Indian Defense. For once Reshevsky castled early on the King's side of the board, whereas Sherwin, at his ninth turn, castled on the opposite wing. They jockeyed for position for the next eight moves when Reshevsky, in exchanging knights, opened the KR file.
Reshevsky in Trouble
Thereupon Sherwin based a powerful attack upon the black king. To ward this off Reshevsky saw fit, in order to recover a pawn, to give up a rook for a knight. From then on the international grandmaster was distinctly on the defensive but still in trouble when Sherwin was called upon to seal his move.
Fischer played with his customary confidence against the world junior champion, who opposed him with the white pieces. The Brooklyn lad castled on the king's side and Lombardy followed suit two moves later.
With 7 P-Q5 Lombardy brought about a partly locked position, while Fischer fianchettoed both bishops. With a capture of a pawn, in passing, Lombardy broke open the position at the thirteenth move. But Fischer, playing steadily, clung to the initiative. Rooks and minor pieces were exchanged and Lombardy brought his queen into action on the king knight file.
Lombardy forced an exchange of queens on the thirty-first move, but still Fischer's position held tight. He missed a promising line of play at the thirty-fourth move with Kt-Q7, whereas Kt-Kt4 would have been more effective. At the close it was anybody's choice.

Reshevsky Lags In Chess Contest

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, January 4, 1958 - Page 13

Fischer Regains Title Chess Lead
Youth Defeats Lombardy in 53 Moves—Berliner and Seidman Play to Draw
Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old national open champion, was back in first place last night in the United States title tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club after winning his adjourned tenth-round game from William Lombardy.
Lombardy, the holder of the world junior title, was too optimistic in his estimate of the unfinished position, wherein he had equal chances. In fact, he was the one avoiding a repetition of moves leading to a draw—a misconception that cost him the game in fifty-three moves.
At his forty-second turn Lombardy threatened a black pawn but, instead of proceeding to capture it, moved his rook to the seventh rank. He lost more on the forty-fourth move after which Fischer took complete command and forced through a passed pawn, costing Lombardy a rook.

Reshevsky Faces Setback
The standing then disclosed Fischer in first place with a score of 8½—1½, ahead of Samuel Reshevsky, with 8—1 and one game adjourned. Reshevsky's unfinished game with James T. Sherwin, favorable to Sherwin, was not played off.
Lombardy, after his loss to Fischer, was a poor third with 6—4. Only three more rounds remain to be contested. The eleventh is scheduled today.

Fischer Regains Title Chess Lead

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 70

Fischer Sets Pace In U.S. Championship
The oldest and the youngest of the 14 contestants are setting the pace in the tournament for the United States chess championship, being played at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs in New York.
Leader after nine rounds is 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, with a score of 7½-1½. The Brooklyn schoolboy has won six games and drawn three against Samuel Reshevsky, Herbert Seidman and Hans Berliner. Fischer, who last summer won the open championship of the U.S. Chess Federation, is playing steady and frequently brilliant chess, with mature skill in every department of the game.”

Fischer Sets Pace In U.S. Championship

Daily News New York, New York Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 116

Chess Battle Royal Will End on Tuesday
Three weeks of nerve-wracking concentration will end Tuesday at the Manhattan Chess Club, 35 W. 64th St. in the crowning of the chess king of the United States.
The tourney has captured the attention of 750,000 fans and kibitzers in the metropolitan area, according to Maurice J. Kasper, directed of the 90-year-old club.

“Strictly for Pros”
“This one is strictly for the pros,” Kasper said. All 14 entrants are chess masters, and one, Samuel Reshevsky, is an international grand master.”
Other top competitors for the title and the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy accompanying it are: Arthur Bisguier, the present U.S. champ; William Lombardy, world junior champ; Arnold Denker and James Sherwin.
“Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn is also playing,” Kasper said. Fischer, of 560 Lincoln Place, is the 14-year-old prodigy whom some chess experts acclaim as potentially the greatest player in the world.

Once in a Century
“A player of his caliber comes along once in a century,” according to Kasper. Fischer holds the U.S. open championship, which he won in 1956, and the New Jersey open, won last September.
“In this tournament,” Kasper said, ”each of the 14 plays the others once. A win counts one point and a tie counts one-half. The player with the most points wins.”
In addition to the trophy and the title, the winner captures the first leg on the world championship match. He qualifies to enter a zonal contest where champions from all nations compete to challenge the world champion since last year, Vassily Smyslov of Russia.
The club, the oldest in this country, was founded in 1867 and incorporated in 1877, and, said Kasper, “has been the home of many of the world's greatest players since its founding.”

Chess Battle Royal Will End on Tuesday

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 3

Fischer Adjourns Di Camillo Game
Leader in U.S. Chess Has Edge in 11th-Round Test—Sherwin Is Victor
Although he outplayed his eleventh-round opponent, Atilio Di Camillo of Philadelphia, in the United States championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club last night, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 14-year-old national open champion, was forced to adjourn after forty moves, sealing his forty-first move.
He then had a bishop, knight and four pawns against a rook and four pawns. In actual fighting force the youth had the upper hand, but victory was by no means certain.
Fischer, with white, started with the Reti opening, which Di Camillo defended with the Tschigorin variation. Bobby castled on the fifth move, but Di Camillo waited until the nineteenth. In the mid-game complications the youngster kept his head and saw more clearly than his older adversary.
Pawn Advantage is Lost
Di Camillo emerged with a pawn to the good, but this, too, fell before Fischer's accurate play. His leading score of 8½-1½ remained the same. …
Among the following scores are the moves made by Fischer and Di Camillo up to the time of adjournment:

Fischer Adjourns Di Camillo Game

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, January 06, 1958 - Page 32

Reshevsky Beats Kramer In Chess
Wins Eleventh-Round Test After 30 Moves to Take U.S. Tourney Lead
Samuel Reshevsky's white king was still in the center of the board, on its original square, when early yesterday morning George Kramer resigned to him their postponed eleventh-round game in the United States championship for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
It was not a so-called “fighting king,” nor did the king's rook operate at any time, except as a reserve force. After thirty moves, at the end of a five-hour session, the international grand master gained a point and first place with a score of 9—1.

Strongly Posted Knight
Bobby Fischer, the national open champion, who is making a brilliant bid for the higher title, was second at 8½—1½. Because of adjourned games, these positions are tentative.
The Nimzo-Indian defense adopted by Kramer was turned into a stonewall Dutch defense, supporting a strongly posted knight. Reshevsky refrained from capture of a pawn when Kramer castled and the latter swapped king's bishop for a knight.
The remaining white knight was powerfully located at KB4 and was destined to play a major part in white's eventual triumph.…

Leaders Adjourn Matches
The two leaders both adjourned their twelfth-round games after forty moves last night. Their opponents held equal positions. Reshevsky faced Edmar Mednis and Fischer opposed Arnold S. Denker. …

Reshevsky Beats Kramer In Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, January 07, 1958 - Page 82

Reshevsky Loses Game To Sherwin
Bows for First Time in U.S. Chess, Enabling Fischer to Take Tourney Lead
Samuel Reshevsky, international grandmaster, suffered his first defeat in the United States chess championship at the Manhattan Chess Club last night.
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old Brooklyn prodigy, won and drew in the completion of two adjourned games to take first place from Reshevsky with a score of 10—2.
Fischer, the national open champion, won a most difficult ending after sixty-nine moves from Atilio De Camillo of Philadelphia in an eleventh-round test and drew with Arnold S. Denker in their twelfth round match in forty-nine moves.
Fischer will meet Al Turner in the thirteenth and final round tonight at the Manhattan Chess Club. Reshevsky whose score is 9½—2½, must reckon with William Lombardy, the world junior champion. Fischer and Reshevsky will play the white pieces.

Reshevsky Loses Game To Sherwin: Bows for First Time in U.S. Chess, Enabling Fischer to Take Tourney Lead

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, January 08, 1958 - Page 93

Fischer Annexes U.S. Chess Title
Plays Draw With Turner—Reshevsky, Set Back by Lombardy, Finishes 2d
Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy who is the national open titleholder, last night became the United States champion by finishing first in the tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
He wound up with a score of 10½—2½ when he drew in the thirteenth and final round with Al Turner, who played a Queen's Indian defense. After eighteen moves had been recorded, Turner offered the draw to his young adversary, who accepted.
The prospect then was that Fischer's score might be equaled by Samuel Reshevsky, the international grandmaster, who was pitted against William Lombardy, the world junior champion. This match, in contrast to the tameness of the Fischer-Turner game, was most exciting.

Lombardy's Attack Succeeds
Lombardy engineered a dangerous attack against the white king on the open king's knight's file. Eventually Lombardy succeeded and Reshevsky resigned when it came his turn to make his forty-first move.
Reshevsky finished in second place and the coveted title went to Fischer.
The defeat was the second in the tournament for Reshevsky. His first, in the tenth round, was administered by James T. Sherwin.
In addition to the Rosenwald award, Fischer received custody of the Frank J. Marshall Memorial Trophy, donated by the Marshall Chess Club. Both Fischer and Reshevsky qualified for the right to represent this country in the world championship interzonal tournament to be held in Europe next year.

The details of the two games played by Fischer and Reshevsky follow:

Fischer Annexes U.S. Chess Title

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 09, 1958 - Page 19

14-Year-Old Wizard Wins National Title
Fourteen-year-old Bobby Fischer has added the U.S. National Rosenwald Trophy to his U.S. Open and National Junior chess championships.
The Brooklyn schoolboy defeated 13 of the best players in the country to win the crown in three weeks of competition at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs in New York. He clinched the title Tuesday night and on Wednesday attended high school classes in Brooklyn as usual among friends of whom many, according to one intimate, “don't even know he plays chess.”
Bobby thus has achieved a competitive record that, at his age, is on a part with the Morphys, Capablancas and Reshevskys as a chess prodigy. Reshevsky, long regarded as the leading player of the United States and the Western world, was runnerup to Bobby in this tournament.
Throughout the tourney Fischer and Reshevsky alternated in the lead. Bobby took it for keeps Monday night when Reshevsky was beaten in an adjourned 10th round game by James T. Sherwin, then held to a 12th round draw by Edmar Mednis in a bitterly fought 78-move game. Meanwhile, Fischer drew ahead by defeating Atilio De Camillo of Philadelphia in an adjourned 11th round game and drawing with Arnold S. Denker in the 12th round.
None of the 12 contestants was within shooting distance of the top two stars at the finish.

★ ★ ★

14-Year-Old Wizard Wins National Title

This article also appears in,

Ukiah Daily Journal, Ukiah, California, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 2

Gangling 14-Year Old Surprises: Boy Upsets International Grandmaster in Chess Play
By DOC QUIGG

NEW YORK (UP)—Robert James Fischer, Brooklyn's gift to international eggheadism, sat there in shirtsleeves, tieless, biting his dirty fingernails, chewing his tongue, twisting his lanky schoolboy legs against the chair rungs as his gray eyes swept up and down the chessboard.
A chess authority in the crowd of spectators whispered in awe: “If he wins the title, it will be the greatest miracle in all chess history.”
Across the narrow room, in another final-round game of the tournament for the coveted U.S. chess championship, sat the great Samuel Reshevsky, an International Grandmaster and long regarded as one of the world's greatest players.

Reshevsky Confident
Reshevsky was a study in poise and confidence in a neat blue suit, cigarette perched between two fingers, arms folded, eyes blinking behind brown-rim glasses, his bald and bulging head shining a bit in the fluorescent lighting. He sat beneath a portrait of himself, the only decoration on the gray walls of the tournament room of the 90-year-old Manhattan Chess Club.
On the archway entrance was pasted a penciled sign: “Spectators are requested not to snore in the tournament room.” This civilized way of yelling “Quiet!” was the only touch of humor as three nerve-wrecking weeks of chess play reached climax. It was the first national championship tournament in three years.
The 14 top players — including Bobby Fischer in his purple striped shirt, brown corduroy pants, blue socks, and heavy shoes — each played the others once. Late in the evening there was a winner and new champ, Bobby Fischer. The miracle had happened. For Bobby is only 14.
Reshevsky finished in second place.
Out in the lobby, Maurice J. Kasper, club president, was saying: “It's fantastic. It's unbelievable. Never in the history of the world has a 14-year-old boy been playing, and winning from, masters and grandmasters.”
Bobby is a very quiet boy. His reaction at the moment of winning was typical. He looked at his mother and said, “Let's go home.”
Asked Thursday, on the morning of his victory, if he would care to be interviewed for the papers, he said, “Nah, can't talk to you today.”. Did he think he would be able to talk some other day? “Nah, don't think so.”
His voice is piping, hasn't changed yet. But the top of his forward-brushed towhead reaches about five-feet-nine. He has a long nose and thin, angular face and he plays chess with a pleasantly studied air, flicking his head to the right occasionally as if rejecting strategy ideas.
During the final round he gangled into an anteroom between moves and a chuckling admirer clutched his painfully thin shoulder and boomed: “Say, he's getting a little fat on 'um, hah?”
Bobby last summer won the U.S. Open Championship. With this new, and top, title he is eligible to be declared an International Grandmaster and compete for the world championship, now held by Vassily Smyslov of Russia. Bobby used to cry when he lost a game but he doesn't any more. For about a year now he hasn't had much chance to cry.

Gangling 14-Year Old Surprises: Boy Upsets International Grandmaster in Chess Play

This article also appears in,

The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday, January 11, 1958 - Page 14

14-Year-Old Champ
Chess may be a game for graybeards, but it's the young fellows who excel at it. The new United States champion is a 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy named Bobby Fischer.
To the best of our knowledge and belief, Bobby is the youngest person ever to win the national title; and we have never heard of any other country, now or in the past, with a champion that young. Most of the outstanding players of the past were impressive while they were still in short pants, but didn't win any really big championships until they were older.
The new champ replaces Samuel Reshevsky, who had been winning American championships so regularly that he seemed to have a permanent lease on the title. Sammy is a former child prodigy himself. Coming here from his native Poland as a small boy, he toured the country giving simultaneous exhibitions against scores of adults in various cities. Grown up, he became perennial national champion and an international grand master, who finished third in a tournament held to select a new world champion after the death of Alexander Alekhine a decade ago. But now he is pushing 50, which is rather old for a chess champion to retain his title. Tournament chess is a young man's game: surprisingly, it takes a lot of physical stamina.
Young Fischer, who deposed of Reshevsky this week, is a veteran who has been playing in tournaments for several years. Last year he won the U.S. Open title, but the Open is a less exalted event and Reshevsky was not entered. Now in the U.S. Championship Fischer has finished first, with a score of 9½-2½. The best Reshevsky could do was second, with 8½-3½.
Two losses late in the event were too much for the international grand master. He was defeated by William Lombardy, a young who went abroad in 1957 to bring home the world junior championship, and by James T. Sherwin, another young fellow. Fischer, the eventual winner, only drew in his game with Reshevsky but did better against the other entrants.
With such good young American players developing, it begins to look as if Russia's grip on the world championship might not be so secure as it has appeared to be during the last decade.

14-Year-Old Champ

This article also appears in,

Edmonton Journal Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Saturday, January 11, 1958 - Page 27

14-Year-Old Chess Champion
New York (CP) — Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy, is the new chess champion of the United States.
He finished the 13-round tournament with 10½ points, drawing in the final round with Al Turner, who played a queen's Indian defense. After 18 moves, Turner offered a draw and Fischer accepted.
At this point, Samuel Reshevsky of New York, an international grandmaster, was engaged in an exciting match with William Lombardy, world junior champion, and stood a chance of equaling Fischer's score.
Lombardy, however, engineered a dangerous attack against the white king on the open king's knight's file, and eventually succeeded, Reshevsky resigning on the 41st move.
Reshevsky finished second in the tournament, with 9½ points.

14-Year-Old Chess Champion

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 12, 1958 - Page 74

Bobby Fischer Wins U.S. Championship
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won the United States chess championship without the loss of a game, winning nine and drawing five against most of the leading American masters.
Fischer, who is all of 14 years old and a student at Erasmus Hall High School, is the youngest national champion in the long history of chess. He is also the holder of the open championship of the U.S. Chess Federation, a title which he acquired in Cleveland last summer.
Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y., who was heavily favored to win, kept pace with Fischer through most of the tournament, each player leading at different times. A loss to James T. Sherwin in the 10th round put Reshevsky behind.
Starting the final round at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, Fischer had a half-point margin. His opponent, Abe Turner, offered a draw after 18 moves. Fischer accepted, which gave him a certainty of a tie for first if Reshevsky should win, and the championship if the latter should lose or draw.
[…]
Reshevsky's final score was 9½-3½, which was good enough for second prize. He and Fischer earned the right to represent the United States in the Interzonal Tournament this summer, which is the next stage in the process of selection of a world championship challenger.

Bobby Fischer Wins U.S. Championship

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 16, 1958 - Page 16

Bobby Fischer Leads Free World Players

Bobby Fischer's triumph in the U.S. National Championship is still the talk of the chess world this week.
The 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy has gained heights seldom if ever attained by a player his age. He holds an unprecedented “triple crown” in the National title, the U.S. Open, and the National Junior Championship.
Bobby's victory in the National is the most stunning of the three, because it came over Samuel Reshevsky, long regarded as champion of the free world. Although the two drew in their meeting in the National, Bobby finished a clear point ahead of the older star, and for the first time Sammy's claim to leadership in the Western world is definitely subject to dispute.
Final standings of the tournament found Fischer a point out in front at 10½-2½; Reshevsky second at 9½-3½; Sherwin, 9-4; Lombardy, 7½-5½; Berliner, 7-6; Denker, Feuerstein and Mednis tied at 6½-6½; Seidman, 6-7; Bernstein and Bisguier, 5-8; DiCamillo and Turner, 4½-8½, and Kramer, 3-10.
The title was not decided till the final night and Reshevsky had a chance to tie for first right down to the finish. In the 13th and final round Fischer accepted a draw offered him by Al Turner after 18 moves. Reshevsky could have equaled his score by defeating William Lombardy, the junior world's champion. Instead Lombardy won an exciting game in 40 moves. It was Reshevsky's second defeat of the tournament. James T. Sherwin administering the other in the 10th round.
Scores of Reshevsky's and Fischer's last-round games are appended below.

Bobby Fischer Leads Free World Players

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 16, 1958 - Page 4

Fischer's Success
The 14-year-old American prodigy, Bobby Fischer, has just achieved another astonishing success in winning the United States championship without loss of a game—10½ points out of 13. Fischer was a point in front of Reshevsky, generally recognized as the No. 5 player in the world, and far ahead of such well-known masters as Lombardy, Denker, and Bisguier. By this result Fischer has qualified for this year's interzonal tournament for the world championship, and it will indeed be interesting to see what further successes await this boy who is already far in advance of Morphy or Capablanca at the same age.

Fischer's Success

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, January 19, 1958 - Page 42

U.S. Championship
The Lessing J. Rosenwald cup, giving title of champion chess players of the United States, has been won by Bobby Fischer, 14 year old player, with score of 10½-2½. Samuel Reshevsky took second place with score 9½-3½, followed by Sherwin 9-4, Lombardy 7½-5½, Berliner 7-6, and 9 others.
The unfinished game, published last Sunday, between Sherwin and Reshevsky was won by the former. Both Fischer and Reshevsky qualify for the International Tournament for the World Championship.
Game Selection
Our selection of game this week is from the recent tournament in New York City, and is one played by champion Bobby Fischer.

U.S. Championship

The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Sunday, January 19, 1958 - Page 63 ()

Newsweek plunges into assessing the East-West struggle and therewith produces a striking symbolic cover of a chess game played with red and white chess pieces. Guess which side is which. Reporting on orthodox non-political chess playing, there's a story about Bobby Fischer, the newly-proclaimed American chess champion who has reached the ripe old age of 14.

Newsweek East-West Struggle

The Evening Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Monday, January 20, 1958 - Page 16

Champion At 14
An even 100 years have gone by since Paul Morphy of New Orleans, at the age of 20, became chess champion of the world. He resigned four years later when there were no more unbeaten masters left to challenge him—which makes it 96 years since an American has attained that symbolic mountain peak of the intellect. Germany, Austria, Russia (as at present), the Netherlands, even Cuba has produced one or more world's champions, meantime; they were older men, too, for the legend of the youthful chess prodigy dissipates against the factual background of vast tactical knowledge and the stiff tournament-entry qualifications that a newcomer must acquire on his way up.
Visions of a new champion, or at least contender, now at last float before the eyes of American chess fans. He is Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who at 14 is still only a high school sophomore, yet who has just won the Marshall Cup, which is considered emblematic of the national championship. In so doing he displaced Samuel Reshevsky himself, the one postwar American who has proved himself able to take on the top-level Russians on more or less even terms. Young Fischer hasn't even played any Russians yet, let alone sat down to a board across from Vasily Smyslov, the 36-year-old world title-holder. But the day, or month, may not be far off.
This startling appearance in our midst of a new potential world grand master could argue well for American chess—various recent signs of growth and youth have been observed—but mostly it is a fortuitous event, just as it was when the amazing Morphy dazzled the spectators of his era. Russia, too, no doubt has some teen-age whizzes on the way up. And no telling what other interests could come along to deflect the amazing Fischer. There are those among his countrymen who will be content if he merely goes on to college and turns into a brilliant mathematics major.

Champion At 14

St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Wednesday, January 22, 1958 - Page 41

Boy Chess Champ From Brooklyn

BROOKLYN, N.Y. Jan 22.
BOBBY FISCHER is a 14-year-old boy living in Brooklyn.
He is also chess champion of the United States and qualified, with famed Samuel Reshevsky, to represent the United States in the world championship interzonal tournament to be held in Europe next year.
Chess is associated in the public mind with two old codgers facing each other over the board, their equally stolid expressions broken only by Van Dyke beards and curving pipes.

Master Fischer is beardless—no oddity at his age—and doesn't smoke. But he can play chess. Early in the fall of 1957 Bobby upset more than 200 of the country's top-ranking players to win the United States open chess championship. Then earlier this month he capped his growing list of honors and became the United States champion, winning the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club of New York.

His brilliant play has won him the title of master, leading some wits to dub him Master Master Fischer. Learning the rudiments of the game from his sister Joan when he was six years old, Bobby spent the next seven years studying the game, playing with friends, and poking through foreign language chess books to absorb the moves of classic games. Two years ago he entered his first big tournament, the United States junior championship, and won in a breeze.
Not only in actual triumphs but in manner of play has Bobby earned the plaudits of the chess world, one of his victories bringing from the “Chess Review” the description as “The game of the century.”

The great concentration he shows in tournaments—at which he once used to burst into tears when he lost—is in sharp contrast to his restlessness in his high school classroom.
Told that Bobby sat for five hours at a chess tournament, one of his school teachers gasped, “In my class, Bobby couldn't sit still for five minutes.”

Said to be of generally superior intelligence by school authorities, Bobby is no better than an average student. His wakeful moments are for chess.
The problems of this sport are his problems, during meals, while watching television and at his bedside where there is a permanent chess board with pieces arranged.
Although these chess triumphs of her teen-age son are sources of pride to Mrs. Regina Fischer, she is not a forth-right adherent of the value of her son's single mindedness on the subject.
“For four years,” she told one interviewer, “I tried everything I knew to discourage him. But it was hopeless.”
During his summer vacations, Bobby is to be found nightly at his “favorite hangout,” she continued, and “sometimes I have to go over there at midnight to haul him out of the place.”
The hangout: the ancient and dignified Manhattan Chess Club, “hangout” of numerous champions and chess masters.
Among the club's membership is international grand master Samuel Reshevsky, considered perhaps the finest player in the western world. But, in the recent tournament, the youngest American ever to be awarded the title of chess master, Bobby Fischer, edged grand master Reshevsky, with a score of 10½-2½ to 9½-3½.
The New York Herald Tribune Post-Dispatch Special Dispatch.

Boy Chess Champ From Brooklyn

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The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Saturday, January 25, 1958 - Page 7

Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn's 14-year-old triple crown chess champion, is learning to ski under the tutelage of Olympic competitor Toni Kastner — and in return is teaching Kastner to play chess. Many chess (not cheese) champs have been good athletes. Cuba's Jose Capablanca was a top tennis star and Russia's Boris Spassky clears six feet in the high jump.

Bobby Fischer Learning to Ski With Toni Kastner

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 26, 1958 - Page 10

Rosenwald Tournament
As reported last week, young Bobby Fischer won the Rosenwald and USCF championship tournament held in New York a few weeks ago, finishing ahead of the country's No. 1 player, Grandmaster Samuel Reshevsky, which prompted one wit to remark, “The Reshevsky of tomorrow playing the Bobby Fischer of yesterday.”
Reshevsky was a child prodigy, who came to this country when he was only 7. He played a simultaneous exhibition in Milwaukee in 1920, in a tour of the country, and was a perennial U.S. champion in the late 30's. He is one of the most tenacious fighters among the world's leading players.
Bobby Fischer's brief career is similar in that he learned the game only three years ago, yet developed so rapidly that he must presently be ranked with Reshevsky at the top of the list in the Western Hemisphere. It will be very interesting to see how he does in competition with other leading grand masters, for that seems to be the obvious next step for the 15 year old lad who, in a space of five short months, has won the U.S. Open, the U.S. Junior Championship, and the USCF championship.

Rosenwald Tournament

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, January 26, 1958 - Page 51

Bobby Fischer Wins U.S. Championship Without Loss of a Game
Bobby Fischer won the chess championship of the United States without the loss of a game, winning nine and drawing five against what I.A. Horowitz called “perhaps the strongest field ever to compete for the title.”
Samuel Reshevsky, one of the great players of our time, finished second, a full point behind Fischer.
The top two players in the National tournament have been seeded into the F.I.D.E.'s Interzonal tournament, second giant step on the road to the world title. If either Reshevsky or Fischer decline to attend the Interzonal, then James Sherwin, who finished third, will be eligible.

Bobby Fischer Wins Chess Championship of the United States Without the Loss of a Game

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 26, 1958 - Page 70

U.S. Championship Notes
The full cross-table of the tournament for the U.S. chess championship shows the decisive character of Bobby Fischer's victory. The 14-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy was the only undefeated player, with everyone else losing at least twice.

U.S. Championship Notes

The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Thursday, January 30, 1958 - Page 35

THE CHAMP: Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old sophomore from Erasmus Hall High School, won the U.S. Chess Championship this month, beating America's veteran chessmasters. The youngster refuses to wear a tie or jacket. At Grossinger's a few days ago he tried to enter the dining room, wearing a sweater. Abe Friedman the maitre d', stopped him and said: “I know you're going to Moscow in July, to play against their champions. If you're invited to a state dinner there, wouldn't you wear a tie?” … The boy shook his head: “If I have to wear a tie, I won't go.”

The Champ Bobby Fischer

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 30, 1958 - Page 2

Fischer-Mednis
Judging by the quality of his play in the United States championship, which he won without loss of a game, the 14-year-old Bobby Fischer is already of grandmaster strength. His improvement over the last year has been so rapid that it may not even be beyond him to finish among the leaders in the inter-zonal tournament in August and thus qualify for the final eliminating stage for the world title.
The amazing progress made by this boy emphasizes how the great number of tournaments nowadays enables gifted young players to reach the top much earlier in their careers than was the case 50 or even 30 years ago. Even now, however, it is rare for a young player to do well internationally in his teens, and Fischer's achievement quite overshadows the 13-year-old Pomar's draw with Alekhine or the 16-year-old Spassky's win from Smyslov. Here is one of his games from the United States championship.

Fischer-Mednis

Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, February 02, 1958 - Page 17

Side Glances
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old chess genius, recently won the title of United States Chess Champion by the amazing score of 10½-2½. He did not lose a single game, scoring eight wins and five draws. Grandmaster Reshevsky came in second.
Last year Bobby won the U.S. Junior title, the U.S. Open title and the New Jersey title. Better watch out, Mr. Smyslov, Bobby has his eye on the world title too!

Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old chess genius Wins U.S. Chess Championship

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, February 06, 1958 - Page 37

Brilliancy Prize Goes to Fischer For Game Won From James T. Sherwin
Split Eleventh-Round Point at Bogota—New Yorker Turns Back Humerez
Lombardy Takes Prize
The American Chess Foundation, which sponsored the recent Lessing J. Rosenwald tournament for the championship of the United States, yesterday awarded the first prize for brilliancy to Lombardy.
The award, announced by Maurice J. Kasper, treasurer of the foundation, was made in recognition of his conduct of the game the junior champion of the world won from Samuel Reshevsky in the final round of the tournament. This defeat of the international grand master brought about the victory in the championship of Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn.
The second brilliancy prize went to Fischer for the game he won from James T. Sherwin and third prize to Herbert Seidman for the game he took from Bisguier.

Brilliancy Prize Goes to Fischer For Game Won From James T. Sherwin

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, February 09, 1958 - Page 38

Fischer Ski Enthusiast
Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old student, who recently won the United States open and closed championships, has become a ski enthusiast. He is taking lessons from Tony Kastner at the Grossinger Country Club. In return, the youngster is teaching the skiman how to play chess.

Fischer Ski Enthusiast

The Observer, London, Greater London, England, Sunday, February 09, 1958 - Page 5 (2)

Chess: The New Generation—5
New? No not new but the very newest generation: how else can one characterize the 14-year-old Bobby Fischer, who has just won the United States Championship with a score of 10½ points out of 13, one full point ahead of no less a player than Reshevsky, the grandmaster known to his admirers as the champion of the Western world. This was clearly no flash in the pan as Fischer won a number of strong tournaments in the States last year, including the Open U.S. Championship at Cleveland. Now, with his recent triumph, he has qualified as one of the two U.S. representatives to play in the Interzonal Tournament in Yugoslavia this August and it will be interesting to see how he fares against some twenty of the world's best players.
Uniting great combinational gifts with an astonishingly mature positional judgment Fischer seems destined to be one of the world's great players. Here is the game with which he beat the former holder of the U.S. title. New York, December, 1957. French Defense.

Chess: The New Generation

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 13, 1958 - Page 11

Bobby Fischer's Triumph Over Samuel Reshevsky
The following game can be said to be the decisive one in the recent U.S. championship. It enabled Bobby Fischer to go into the last round undefeated and a half-point ahead of Samuel Reshevsky. Fischer then needed only a draw to assure himself of at least a tie with Reshevsky for the title. The youngster got his draw but Reshevsky, needing a victory over William Lombardy to tie Fischer, was beaten.
Bobby's triumph in this game was achieved only after a terrific two-session struggle with Attilio DiCamillo, Philadelphia ace.

Bobby Fischer's Triumph Over Samuel Reshevsky

Altoona Mirror, Altoona, Pennsylvania, Friday, February 14, 1958 - Page 7

All About The Game of Chess
The American chess world is watching the amazing progress of a young 14-year-old, Bobby Fischer by name. He is being acclaimed as the finest 14 year old player that ever lived. Here is a game he played when 13 against Donald Byrne, an accredited grand master. This game was played in the Rosenwald Tournament in 1956 which was won by Reshevsky. Incidentally, Donald Byrne, who lost to Fischer won from Reshevsky to give Reshevsky his only loss in this tournament.

All About The Game of Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, February 15, 1958 - Page 24

Fischer Beats 24 In Chess
Opposed by twenty-five players in his first exhibition of simultaneous play since he won the United States chess championship, Bobby Fischer, 14 years old, last night almost made a clean sweep at the the Marshall Chess Club. He defeated 24 rivals and drew his last game with Si Sperber of Manhattan, unattached, in a Sicilian defense lasting seventy-four moves.

Fischer Beats 24 In Chess

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, February 16, 1958 - Page 36

“Fischer's games are a revelation … Reshevsky tried hard but the kids are just too strong,” said Harry Lyman, U.S. Amateur Champion.

The Pirc defense is the brainchild of the famous Yugoslavian master, Vasya Pirc. It is pronounced, according to some sources, “Perch” and according to others “Peerts.” We lean to Peerts. But, whichever pronunciation you choose, even a flip-top box won't help that pawn position broken on both wings.
Here is one of U.S. Champion Fischer's revelatory works. The Pirc Defense seems quite exotic to us; the classicist in us shudders at the Pawn position Black deliberately sets up.
No. 166—Pirc Defense
Fischer vs. Mednis

Fischer vs. Mednis, Pirc Defense

Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Sunday, February 16, 1958 - Page 11

Fischer Chess Champ At 14
NEW YORK (AP) —Bobby Fischer was a little slow in catching on to this game of chess. He didn't learn the moves until he was 6, and didn't start playing really seriously until he was 8.
So Saturday night, at the ripe old age of 14, he takes custody of the 22-year-old Frank J. Marshall trophy, emblematic of the United States open and closed championships. The award is to be made at the Marshall Chess Club, and Bobby is a little worried.
As part of the festivities he must play simultaneous matches with more than 20 rivals, and he is afraid they will last so long he won't be able to get an early start on his skiing at Grossinger's Sunday.
A thoroughly normal youngster, aside from his mastery of chess, is this 10th grader at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn who won top U.S. honors by winning eight games, drawing in five, and scoring 10½ of a possible 13 points in the national championships recently.

Fischer Chess Champ At 14

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 20, 1958 - Page 11

“In the U.S. Open Championship last year, former champion Arthur Bisguier lost his title to 14-year-old Bobby Fischer although he finished with the same score. When the two met again in the National Championship at New York the outcome of their match was more decisive. Bisguier was forced to resign on the 41st move. The game follows:”

Bobby Fischer vs. Arthur Bisguier

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, February 23, 1958 - Page 58

Reshevsky Loses Twice
In the recently completed tournament for the U.S. Chess Championship, both Bobby Fischer and Samuel Reshevsky won eight of their 13 games. The difference was that Fischer drew his remaining five, whereas Reshevsky was defeated twice.

Reshevsky Loses Twice

This article also appears in,

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, February 23, 1958 - Pages 241, 261, 263

Fourteen-Year-Old 'Mozart of Chess'; Called the greatest natural player the game has ever known, national champion Bobby Fischer will first lose his adenoids and then seek the world title.
By Harold C. Schonberg

In a few weeks, the winner of the United States Chess Championship, the United States Junior Championship and several other assorted baubles will go to the hospital and have his adenoids out, thus missing a few days at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, where he is a sophomore. Bobby Fischer, who will be 15 on March 12, has been taking on all comers in chess ever since he wandered into the Manhattan Chess Club at the age of 12 and proceeded to startle the potzers with his phenomenal ability at “rapid transit.” A potzer, is a species of chess player who ranks about Class Z in a stern hierarchy that (in the American ratings system) starts with Class B and works up through Class A, Expert, Master, Senior Master and Grandmaster. Rapid transit is ten-second chess, in which the good player intuitively feels rather than studies positions, since he has only ten seconds to make each move. “Bobby was a demon at rapid transit,” one of the masters at the Manhattan Chess Club says. “We would gather around to watch him. Skill at rapid chess is always a sign of innate talent, the best there is.”
Bobby hung around the club for a year or so, sharpening his game in competition with some of the best players in America. Then he took off with a few million pounds thrust, winning everything in sight, including the American championship in January. Normally reserved and skeptical chess critics find no words to describe Bobby Fischer accurately. He has been called a miracle, the Mozart of chess, the greatest natural genius the game has ever known and a shoo-in for the world's championship if he progresses as he has in the past two years. “Never before in all chess history has there been such a phenomenon,” says Dr. Hans Kmoch, formerly a renowned player, author of recondite chess treatises and secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club. “At his age, neither Morphy, nor Capablanca, nor Reshevsky had such achievements, Bobby won without losing a game and he drew very few.”

Bobby became United States champion on Jan. 7. He turned up at the Manhattan Chess Club that night wearing dungarees and a T-shirt. (He has never been known to wear a necktie and only a short time ago his mother finally managed to get him out of sneakers and into shoes.) He was a half-point ahead, going into the final game, and he drew his match with Abe Turner in short order. That left Samuel Reshevsky, in second place, a full point behind. Reshevsky, one of the most dangerous players alive, had to win to tie Bobby for the championship.
Having nothing much to do, pending the outcome of Reshevsky's game with William Lombardy, Bobby wandered off to a corner of the club and began to play blitz with some friends. (Blitz is quicker than ten-second chess—ten seconds per move quicker.) In the meantime, a crowd gathered around the Reshevsky-Lombardy game. Reports and rumors were relayed to Bobby, who was trying to appear nonchalant. Finally, he could stand it no longer, and he elbowed his way through the crowd. He glanced at the board and came back. “Gee,” he said, “Lombardy's playing like a house!
A half-hour later, Bobby stopped blitzing and walked over to take another look at the game. This time, he took a really long look, about fifteen seconds or so. “Reshevsky's busted,” he announced, returning. “Lombardy's got his rooks doubled on the knight file. What an attack he's got!” All the potzers in the vicinity set up the position and tried to determine how the great Reshevsky was busted. “Hey, Fischer,” one of them called out, “How's Sammy going to lose? We figure a draw.” Fischer came over, bored. “Bill plays here,” he said. “Reshevsky plays here; he must, because if he doesn't * * *” and then followed a fast analysis of the position. &lduqo;I give Reshevsky ten more moves,” Bobby concluded. “and then he must resign.”
Within ten moves, Reshevsky resigned and a great yell went up. Bobby started to jump around and dance, and ten congratulated Lombardy, a saturine, heavy-set boy of 20 who is the world junior champion and a student at City College. “You played tremendously.” Bobby said. “Well, what else could I do?” grinned Lombardy. “You forced me to beat Sammy.”
As a result of his victory, Bobby is entitled to play this August in the interzonal tournament in Yugoslavia. The high-ranking scorers there will then meet in a challenger's tournament and the winner will play Vassily Smyslov, the Russian who is current titleholder, for the world championship. Admirers of Bobby worry about the showing he will make in the interzonal, for he has never before met players of this caliber. But they also worried before the United States tournament. Arthur Bisguier, whom Bobby dethroned as American champion, wrote in The Chess Review:
Bobby Fischer, our youngest luminary, should finish slightly over the center mark,” Bisguier guessed. “He is probably the player in the tournament with the greatest familiarity with the latest wrinkles in opening theory * * *. Still he has had no experience in tournaments of such consistently even strength. Neither he nor his admirers should be discouraged if his result here does not quite measure up to his other triumphs. This is a strong field.”.

Bobby learned the moves at the age of 6, shortly after he had come to New York to live. He was born in Chicago, in 1943, after which his family started a restless traipse that took them to Oregon, Arizona and California. His parents were divorced in 1945 and his mother took all kinds of jobs to keep the family going. When the three of them—Mrs. Fischer, Bobby, and his sister Joan—came to New York in 1948, Mrs. Fischer studied nursing. She is now a registered nurse completing courses for an M.A. in nursing education at New York University.
Joan, now 20, and also a registered nurse who has just entered pre-medical school, taught Bobby the moves. They got a chess set and puzzled out from the directions what to put where. Games were what Bobby loved. Mrs. Fischer says that as a baby he was intensely interested in puzzles. “He would get those Japanese interlocking rings, and things like that, and take things apart I couldn't figure out at all.” Bobby liked chess but it didn't seem to make much impact on him.

In the meantime he was proving a problem in public school. Fresh from California, he had never worn a shirt, and he rebelled against the necessity of dressing up. In the fourth grade, the Brooklyn Community-Woodward school gave him a scholarship. The boy's intelligence quotient has never been made public, but school authorities indicate that it is high in the upper percentile. “Brooklyn Community did a lot for Bobby,” says Mrs. Fischer.
Bobby's chess playing was encouraged by Brooklyn Community. Teachers there remember him running around with copies of Schachmaty (the Russian chess publication) stuffed into his pocket. He was an average student and something of a nonconformist. “We kept him as happy as possible while he was here,” an official of the school says. “We were able to adjust to him.” It was noticed that Bobby was not particularly interested in the academic side of school (continued on Page 61).

Fourteen-Year-Old 'Mozart of Chess'; Called the greatest natural player the game has ever known, national champion Bobby Fischer will first lose his adenoids and then seek the world title.

(continued from Page 38)
life, but that he showed tremendous and fierce concentration on winning in competitive sports.
“He incited a great deal of interest in chess here,” says one of his teachers. “He easily beat everybody, including the chess-playing members of the faculty. No matter what he played, whether it was baseball in the yard, or tennis, he had to come out ahead of everybody. If he had been born next to a swimming pool he would have been a swimming champion. It just turned out to be chess.” Bobby hates to lose. Two or three years back, he would, if he dropped a game, retire to a corner and cry. He no longer cries, but he still feels terrible when he loses.
At the age of 8 or so, Bobby started going to the Brooklyn Chess Club, where Carmine Nigro, its president, took an interest in the child. “He helped me more than anybody,” says Bobby. While most children of his age were reading comic books and reluctantly doing homework, Bobby was subscribing to the aforementioned Schachmaty and all of the American chess magazines. Naturally, his homework took second place. At Erasmus Hall, he is described as an average student, “very good in some subjects, not so good in others, but a very bright boy.”
When he first came to the Manhattan Chess Club he was short and cherubic-looking. Suddenly he started growing. He is now 5 feet 10 inches tall and weights about 140 pounds. He is at an awkward emotional age. He likes being a celebrity but has not acquired the social graces to handle his new position easily. Usually, he is shy and introverted; at other times, boisterous. Only among chess players does he really feel at home; they he is relaxed and happy. “Don't forget,” says an admirer of his, “that he's really a child thrown into a man's world. He's a nice kid. He may be a little cocky, and why shouldn't he be? Right now when he's away from the chess world he has a tendency to go into a shell. He'll get over it.”
A growing boy, Bobby has a growing boy's appetite. He is well built and may make a fine athlete. When he won the championship, he was invited to Grossinger's. Tony Kastner, the ski pro there, found Bobby was following him around. “Bobby will make a good skier,” Kastner says, “His coordination is terrific.” In return for ski lessons, Bobby gave Kastner chess lessons.

He is an abnormally sensitive and touchy boy who is only just beginning to realize that there is a world outside of kings, queens, rooks and pawns. Over the chessboard, in tournament play, he is quiet, assured and completely mature, though his fingernails are bitten to the quick. In offhand chess games, such as blitz, he carries on a rapid, good-natured, nervous patter in a voice that has not settled down as yet. “You dare do this to me? C'mon, make a move * * * Ouch! * * * Look at him! You're busted and you don't know it. Resign, weakie, resign!” Outside of chess world he seems to have few friends. Often when speaking with adults he does not know well, he adopts an air of sullen bravado.
As yet, Bobby has no plans for the future. He doesn't know if he wants to go to college. “If I had a lot of money I'd like to play in chess tournaments. But you can't make a living in chess. (His prize for the American championship was $600.) He does know one thing—he doesn't like newspaper men and says so. He feels that he has always been misquoted or made out to be a freak.
“Those guys always write bad about me,” he says. “They say I'm stupid, that I have nothing but a talent for chess. It's not true. I'm good in some sports. I'm not saying I'm terrific, but I played some tennis , did some ice-skating, and used to be good at baseball. That was when I was young, years ago. We played stickball in the street. I'm pretty good in Spanish, and I like science, astronomy most of all.”
He says that these days he doesn't study chess much, a remark that causes great amusement and some disbelief at the Manhattan Chess Club. “Last year, I concentrated on end-game positions for a few months. Now I'm playing through end games and tournament books.” He has a tremendous knowledge of “book chess”—that is, nearly a total recall of all standard openings and the various lines thereof. He doesn't look for new moves, contenting himself with taking advantage of a positional weakness in an opponent. “It's getting harder and harder to find new moves,” says Bobby. “The Russians do, though. They've got 50,000 people analyzing opening theory.”

IF memorization were all that was needed to make a great player, the woods would be full of them. What makes a great player? “Practice. Study. Talent,” is Bobby's answer. A strong element of imagination and even creation enters into chess on its highest level; and each great player is a stylist. Morphy was a romantic; Reti a hyper-modern; Capablanca a classicist. An expert in chess can distinguish an Alekhine game as easily as an expert in art can identify an unsigned Guardi or Pissaro.
One American chess master describes
(Continued on Page 63)

Fourteen-Year-Old 'Mozart of Chess'; Called the greatest natural player the game has ever known

(Continued from Page 61)
Bobby's style as “effortless. Reminiscent of Capablanca. He's hardly ever in time pressure.” (In most American tournaments, the player must complete forty-two moves in two hours—two and a half hours, in championship tournaments—and, in complicated positions, a player may find himself with only two minutes to make fifteen moves.)

“HE has a beautiful classical style,” says the same master, “and practically no idiosyncrasies. He doesn't favor, say, two bishops or a certain type of position. I see no perceptible weakness in any part of his game, and as a tactician he's marvelous.” The late Dr. Savielly T. Tartakower, one of the great players, once defined tactics as “knowing what to do when there is something to do: strategy is knowing what to do when there is nothing to do.”
Bobby's youth helps. Chess is a young man's game. In all history, there has not been a great chess player who failed to make his mark before he was 20. In the late teens and early twenties, the mind can absorb more and react more quickly, while the body can stand up under the rigors of heavy tournament play: five hours daily, for two weeks or more, during which the brain bubbles and every atom of one's intellectual being is concentrated outside time and space on the infinite possibilities of chess pieces in combination; nights of analysis; a restless turning in bed while games are mentally played over and new tactics devised. Players have been known to lose five pounds during a tournament.
Most chess players fade away after the age of 45. They make mistakes they never previously have made, they don't handle themselves well under time pressure, and new theory passes them by. Along comes a kid who is up on the latest analyses from all over the world and the older man is literally beaten in the opening few moves, though he may struggle for forty or so.

DR. KMOCH still sputters when he recalls the night Bobby won the championship. “In no other country in the world,” he says, “is it conceivable that there would be not one word from the Government. It's inconceivable, fantastic. The entire chess world is stunned with amazement by the announcement that a 14-year-old boy has won the American championship—and silence from the authorities.”
Dr. Kmoch thinks that Bobby is at least one answer to the sputnik, for chess is the Russian national sport. He, and many others in the chess world, have been reading with interest about the cultural interchange plan arranged by former Soviet Ambassador Georgi N. Zaraoubin and William S.B. Lacy, special assistant to the Secretary of State on East-West exchanges. Under the terms of the agreement, some 500 Americans will visit the Soviet Union next year. The betting in the Manhattan Chess Club is a queen against a pawn that no chess players will be represented.
“Bobby may not have the funds to compete this August in Yugoslavia,” Dr. Kmoch says indignantly. “Possibly some of the wealthier players in the club will raise the money. And possibly they may not. Should it be their responsibility?”
But it probably will be private funds that will take care of the trip. “We'll have to do something for him,” says Maurice J. Kasper, president of the Manhattan Chess Club and treasurer of the American Chess Foundation. Neither the A.C.F. nor the United States Chess Federation, however has much much money. Last year, the United States was not represented in the Chess Olympiad. Forty countries sent teams, but the United States players could not raise enough money.

INVITATIONS for Bobby to play in tournaments or to give exhibitions have been pouring in from all over the world. Canada wants him. Mar del Plata in Argentina, where an important tournament is often held, has extended an invitation. England would like to see him in the Hastings tournament. Russia not only has invited him but has promised to pick up the tab for his entire visit there.
Bobby primarily wants to go to Yugoslavia, for from there lies the road to the world championship. He is cagey about his chances in that assemblage. “Let's see who's in it,” he says. “I won't predict.” All I have to do is end up in the upper half of the tournament. That qualifies me for the challenger's tournament.” Bobby leaves little doubt about his confidence of getting in the upper half. He was reminded that the best players of the four leading chess nations—Russia, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia and Argentina—would be represented. He shrugged his shoulders. “They're good too,” he said.

Fourteen-Year-Old 'Mozart of Chess'; Called the greatest natural player the game has ever known

Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Sunday, March 09, 1958 - Page 18

“In addition, he is no doubt aware that youth seems to have an advantage these days. Last year 14-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York won the national junior title and the national open championship, then played in a tournament open only to chess masters, and emerged winner of that. As U.S. champion, Bobby will represent this country in Europe for the world championship.”

East Lansing Youth, 16, Seeks City Chess Honors

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, March 23, 1958 - Page 229

Big Soviet Entry Slated in Chess
At Least 6 Grand masters Will Compete In Interzonal Tourney in Yugoslavia
At least six players will represent Russia in the world championship interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 5 to Sept. 15, according to the International Chess Federation in Stockholm.
All are international grand masters who must be reckoned with by Samuel Reshevsky and Bobby Fischer, if these qualified experts are able to go.
Paul Keres, who has twice held the Soviet championship but lost out in the last challengers' tournament, has been seeded as the fifth man eligible for a place at Portoroz. The sixth will be the loser of the world championship match between Vassily Smyslov and Mikhail Botvinnik, now underway in Moscow.

Big Soviet Entry Slated in Chess

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, March 23, 1958 - Page 66

Latest On Bobby Fischer
“…Reshevsky is said to be considering competing in the Interzonal tournament. Bobby Fischer, U.S. champion and Reshevsky qualified as American representatives.

★ ★ ★

Here is the latest on Fischer: Bobby, in outpointing Reshevsky for the United States championship at the age of 14, eclipsed anything previously accomplished at that age in chess history—name Morphy, Capablanca, Reshevsky himself, Pomar or anybody you like!
A reporter found Bobby shy outside of chess. When questioned he shrugs his shoulders, mumbles an answer in words of one syllable and moves away. He enjoys skating and skiing, but not school. (“It keeps me away from chess.”) He is only an average scholar. (“I'm not good at math.”) One of his teachers said, “He never seems to be properly attending. His thoughts are always far away, on chess.”
When Fischer won the championship, a reporter asked him, did he now consider himself the strongest player in the U.S.A.? “No,” he replied, “one tournament does not mean a lot.” After a pause: “Maybe Reshevsky is better.”

Latest On Bobby Fischer

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, March 23, 1958 - Page 226

Foundation Awards Made
Recognition for outstanding achievement during 1957 by the American Chess Foundation was announced yesterday by Maurice J. Kasper, treasurer, who sent checks of $250 to Bobby Fischer, the new United States champion, and William Lombardy, world junior champion. They are members of the Manhattan Chess Club, of which Kasper is president.
Fischer won three titles, including the United States junior at San Francisco, the United States Chess Federation open at Cleveland and the national in New York.
Lombardy gained his international title at Toronto.

Foundation Awards Made

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, March 27, 1958 - Page 6

“The United States now has only two active grandmasters, Samuel Reshevsky and Bobby Fischer. It is a question whether either of them will be able to play, for lack of financial backing enabling them to make the trip.

Will Reshevsky or Fischer Compete?

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, March 30, 1958 - Page 41

Young U.S. Titlist Likes To Ski, Too
Bobby Fischer, the 14-year-old Brooklyn prodigy who startled the chess world by winning both the United States open and closed championships in recent months, has made a deal with skimeister Tony Kastner at the Grossinger County Club, Grossinger, N.Y.
Fischer, who is just learning to ski, gets lessons from Kastner. In return, the youngster is teaching the skiman how to play chess. Bobby should be qualified. He has beaten just about everyone in sight.
“Bobby is an excellent student,” says Kastner. “He's extremely anxious to learn. Every morning I've found Bobby waiting for me when I came down to open the ski shop.”

No doubt many readers of this column got a good look at young Fischer last Wednesday night when he appeared on television to receive tickets to Russia, where he will play in the big tournaments of that chess-minded country.

Young prodigies are nothing new to chess. Paul Morphy of New Orleans, who later was to win the world championship, took a short match at the age of 12 from a master, J. Loewenthal. Samuel Reshevsky was famous at 6. Arturito Pomar won the championship of Spain at 15, and Jose Capablanca was champion of Cuba at 12.
Before playing this game, study the diagram. White has a move which helped win the first brilliancy prize at the Dublin International last year. Can you spot it?

Young U.S. Titlist Likes To Ski, Too

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, March 30, 1958 - Page 12

FOR COMPETITION
Youthful U.S. Champion In Chess to Meet Reds
NEW YORK, Mar. 29 (AP)—The United States' 15-year-old chess champion, Bobby Fischer, will get a shot at Russia's masters in the world championship tournament next summer.
A television show has given the gangling Brooklyn youngster a round-trip plane ticket to interzonal matches Aug. 5 through Sept. 15 at Portoroz, Yugoslavia. Russia may have at least six players in the event.
The other U.S. eligible, 46-year-old Samuel Reshevsky, may not be able to make trip because of lack of funds. The players' expenses are paid once they reach the tournament.
A world championship match currently is being played in Moscow between titleholder Mikhail Botvinnik, a former champion. It's progress is eagerly followed by Russian chess players and others around the world, estimated to number in the millions.
One point is awarded for winning a game and one half for a draw. The first player to score 12½ points wins the title and if the 24-game match game is played out on even terms the titleholder retains his championship.
Chess is virtually a national game in Russia. American players, counted only in thousands, are by comparison a mere handful.
The interzonal tournament is the second stage in a three-year cycle leading up to a world championship match. The first is qualifying competition in the various zones into which the international federation divides the chess world.
“The interzonal tournament is like the semifinals,” said Kenneth Harkness of the U.S. Chess Federation. “The top seven players in it, I think, qualify for the candidates tournament the next year. The winner of that is entitled to challenge the world champion.”
Asked why Russia should have six or more eligibles and the U.S. only tow, Harkness said: “It's logical. They have so many more players and more masters.”
About 20 or 30 or so players who have won the international title of Grand Masters are Russians. The five already eligible for places in the Portoroz tournament hold that title. The sixth Russian place will go to the loser of the current world title match.
Reshevsky also is a Grand Master. Young Fischer, a gangling 10th grade student at Brooklyn's Erasmus Hall High School, was rewarded for his amazing victories in the U.S. tournament with the title of International Master of chess.
Bobby, who hates to lose a chess game and who is regarded as probably the most remarkably young player ever developed in America, commented:
“They shoulda made me a Grand Master.”

Youthful U.S. Champion In Chess to Meet Reds For Competition

Edmonton Journal Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Monday, April 07, 1958 - Page 21

U.S. Chess Prodigy May Win Crown
Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, now United States chess champion, may be America's answer to Russian chess supremacy, says a former Canadian champion who himself was a “boy wonder.”
Abe Yanofsky, five times Canadian champion or co-champion, North American champion in 1942 and British champion in 1953, said that in five years the Brooklyn prodigy will probably be in the world championship contender class.
“He is not the first child prodigy but he is the first who has ever gone so far at such an age,” said the 32-year-old Winnipeg lawyer in an interview.

Compared With Russian
He compared Fischer to Mikhail Tal, youngest player ever to reach the Russian championship which he won in 1956 at age 19. Tal's attainment compared with that of the younger American, since it is harder to win the Russian title than the American.
“It is quite possible that in a couple of years Fischer will become a grand master.” he said.
However, Yanofsky said he doubts Fischer will reach the world championship class in the next round of international competition. Fischer now ranks as an international master—not a grand master—as a result of his victories in the U.S.
The four-year cycle of international events started last year with qualifications in the various international zones. The inter-zone finals are being held this year, at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 15 to Sept. 15. There the top five qualify for the candidates' tournament in 1959, and the winner then is entitled to challenge the world champion in 1960.
World champion Vasily Symslov currently is playing a 24-game world title match in Moscow against challenger Mikhail Botvinnik, a former champion. As of April 1 Botvinnik had won four and lost two, with five draws, making the point score Botvinnik 6½, Smyslov 4½. The first to reach 12½ points is the winner.
Tal, who won the Russian title again this year, will likely play in Yugoslavia; Russia may have at least six players in the event. Fischer was given a round-trip plane ticket to Yugoslavia by a U.S. television show. The other U.S. eligible, 46-year-old grand master Samuel Reshevsky, is not expected to make the trip.

In Big Time At 15
Yanofsky himself was 15 when he entered the international big time in 1939 in a tournament at Buenos Aires. College and navy service during the Second World War intervened before he won an international master's rating in 1946 at a tourney in Holland.
A contrast between Fischer and Yanofsky, the chess prodigy of a few years back, is that the American boy avidly studies works on chess while Yanofsky says he didn't. Just after defeating Botvinnik in 1946 Yanofsky said: “I never really got down to any serious study of chess. A fellow can read chess books—the only one I've read through was Alekhine's My Hundred Best Games—but I've found the best way to learn is to play against the masters of different countries.”
Yanofsky, however, has since written two books on chess and has a fine chess library.
He started playing when he was nine, in the Jewish Chess Club in Winnipeg.
He recalled that until he was 15 he had no worries except school work and could concentrate on chess. Now, after an absence of several years from major tournaments, he has found that as an adult with responsibilities such as a law career and a family—he was married in 1950—he plays a different type of game.
Yanofsky suggested that Fischer, now wrapped up in chess and with little interest in anything else, still has a few years to go without distractions. His development as he gets older will likely be slower, Yanofsky said.

U.S. Chess Prodigy May Win Crown

The Journal Herald Dayton, Ohio Monday, April 07, 1958 - Page 4

A Game For Youth, Too
Once upon a time it was considered dignified procedure to get out the chessboard and spend a long winter's evening before an open fire. That was when American life was paced in a more leisurely fashion. Then for a time chess, although it commanded adherents, was not much in evidence.
But now an even greater attention is being accorded the ancient game of obscure origin.
Nor is it attracting the attention of the elderly alone as a game to be indulged in when the taste for other amusements has palled. Indeed, it is said that a chess master is, as a rule, at his best between the ages of 35 and 45.
Smyslov and Botvinnik, contenders for the world title, are said to be, respectively, 37 and 46 years old.
Youth is no handicap. Tal, Russia's champion, is 21 years of age while Bobby Fischer, United States champion, is 14!

A Game For Youth, Too

Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Friday, April 11, 1958 - Page 28

U.S. Can't Send Chess Entrants
NEW YORK (AP)—Russia is expected to have at least six chess players trying to qualify for a shot at the world championship in the interzonal tournament next summer. The United States may have none—because there isn't any money to send two qualified players to Yugoslavia.
A world championship match currently is being played in Moscow between titleholder Vasily Smyslov and challenger Mikhail Botvinnik, a former champion.
It's progress is eagerly followed by Russian chess players and others around the world, estimated to number in the millions.
Chess is virtually a national game in Russia. American players, counted only in thousands, are by comparison a mere handful.
Two Americans are eligible to compete in the interzonal matches at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 5 to Sept. 15. They are Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old wonder kid of chess from Brooklyn, and the 46-year-old, Polish-born veteran Samuel Reshevsky.
Whether they'll be able to go is another question. Spokesman at the Marshall Chess Club, where Bobby won the U.S. Open and closed championships this year, explained:
“The United States Federation is supposed to pay their transportation. Once they get over there, their living expenses will be paid. But the federation hardly had enough money to hold the championships here. It doesn't look as if they'll get enough to send them.”
The interzonal tournament is the second stage in a three-year cycle leading up to a world championship match. The first is qualifying competition in the various zones into which the international federation divides the chess world.

U.S. Can't Send Chess Entrants

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, April 13, 1958 - Page 40

William Lombardy Builds Record
While all the talk and most of the publicity has been going to the remarkable Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old phenom, William Lombardy, 20, has been quietly building up a most satisfying international record. Lombardy won the world junior championship last summer. He finished fourth in the title tourney won by Fischer, but it was Lombardy's last round victory over Reshevsky which clinched the championship for Bobby.

William Lombardy Builds Record

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, April 13, 1958 - Page 40 (2)

International Mastership
Young Bobby Fischer, winner of the U.S. Open, U.S.C.F. and Rosenwald Championship, not to mention the U.S. Junior championship during the last year, has been awarded the rank of international master by FIDE, world governing body of chess. Fischer will have an opportunity next year in the Candidates Tournament to justify his somewhat brash remark, “They shoulda' made me a grandmaster.”

International Mastership

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 17, 1958 - Page 5

“Rome (UP)—A California artist today promised the 15-year-old chess champion a set of chessmen out of this world.
“Arthur Elliot, Rome portrait painter from Hollywood, said he received a letter from champion Bobby Fischer of 560 Lincoln pl., Brooklyn, N.Y., expressing interest in a set of space-age chess pieces Elliot designed.
“Elliot's chessmen are graceful, impressionistic representations of sputniks, space stations and missiles replacing queens, knights, pawns and other pieces on the chess board.
“I would very much like to have one of your space chess sets,' Bobby wrote Elliot, 'as a matter of fact, it actually does look rather “spacy.”'”
“The American artist said he would send a set to Bobby, whose only other hobby is science fiction.”

California Artist Promised 15-Year-Old Chess Champion a, Out of this World Set of Chessmen

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Simpson's Leader-Times, Kittanning, Pennsylvania, Thursday, April 17, 1958 - Page 22

Young Pianist, Chess Player Are International Sensations
By Doc Quigg
NEW YORK (UP)—If we can stop yapping about juvenile delinquency long enough, it might be well to ponder the fact that a couple of our juveniles are international sensations.
One is Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who at 14 set the chess world on its ear by defeating grand masters to win the U.S. championship. He now is entitled to a crack at the world chess title, held by Smyslov of Russia.
The other is Van Cliburn of Shreveport, La., and Kilgore, Tex. who at 23 set Moscow on its ear this week by winning the Tchaikovsky international piano competition. This extroverted Irish-Texan (both his mother and father are of Irish descent gave his first public concert in Shreveport at the age of three.

Young Pianist, Chess Player Are International Sensations

Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, April 20, 1958 - Page 2B

Chadwick Club Plans Chess Play
Members of the Chadwick Chess club will meet tomorrow night, 7:30 o'clock, at the club rooms, 4 Eden terrace, and all chess enthusiasts are invited.
President E. Sterling Carter said last night the club is hopeful of arranging a local appearance of Bobby Fischer, the youthful national champion from New York City.

Chadwick Club Plans Chess Play

Pampa Daily News, Pampa, Texas, Wednesday, April 23, 1958 - Page 10

Learning a New Move—U.S. senior chess champion Bobby Fischer, 14, right, is getting some new moves from ski instructor Tony Kastner at the country club in Grossinger, N.Y. In return, Bobby has been teaching Kastner how to play chess, so both beginners should come out even.

Learning a New Move

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, May 08, 1958 - Page 10

“Bobby Fischer will give a simultaneous exhibition at the Jewish Community Center on Saturday, May 31. He will play up to 25 boards.”

Bobby Fischer Simultaneous Exhibition, Up to 25 Boards at Jewish Community Center

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The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey, Saturday, May 10, 1958 - Page 6

3:30-4:30 (13) “Chess Match: U.S. champion Bobby Fischer challenges 13 chess players in simultaneous matches.”

Bobby Fischer, Televised Simultaneous Exhibition

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, May 11, 1958 - Page 124

American Chess Foundation Plea for Funds
The president and the treasurer of the American Chess Foundation has entered a plea for funds. The money, it seems, is needed to ship our stalwarts to Portoroz, Yugoslavia, for the interzonal tournament of the current world series. They are United States champion Bobby Fischer and grand master Samuel Reshevsky.
The interzonal is scheduled for Aug. 5 to Sept. 15. Fischer plans to embark June 22.
Even if both our boys get there they will have their work cut out for them to cut a swath in the field of grand masters. Slated to play at Portoroz are Tal, Petrosian, Bronstein and Averbach of Russia; Panno, Sanguinetti, and Rosetto of Argentina; Fischer and Reshevsky, U.S.A.; Pachman and Filip, Czecho-Slovakia; Benko and Szabo, Hungary; Matanovic and Gligoric, Yugoslavia; Olafsson, Iceland; Neikirk, Bulgaria; Paul Vaitonis, Canada, and Rodolfo Cardosa, Philippines.
Bent Larsen, Denmark, and J.H. Donner, Netherlands, will play off for the final opening.

American Chess Foundation Plea for Funds

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, May 11, 1958 - Page 87 (2) (3)

“The candidate's tournament will be too tough—too many young players, such as the contender from the U.S.A., Bobby Fischer, will be on hand.”

Candidates Tournament Field of Competition

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 12, 1958 - Page 50

New WNTA Gambit
Station WNTA-TV, the ubiquitous Channel 13, televised a chess exhibition yesterday in which Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States champion, played thirteen games simultaneously, winning twelve and drawing one. It was an absorbing demonstration of skill and concentration on the part of young Mr. Fischer.
For the most part the youth moved from board to board so rapidly that there was no chance to study the individual contests. Some overhead cameras will be needed if chess shows signs of being a game that will last.
But the sight of young Fischer briskly making his moves and toppling over the opposing kings one by one made an intriguing race against the clock. And WNTA-TV showed eminent good judgment in postponing the succeeding program a few minutes so that a viewer could see the finish. Networks kindly copy.

New WNTA Gambit

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, May 22, 1958 - Page 40

Russian Chess Prodigy Told to Wait Till He's 8
Moscow, May 21—The Soviet Union unveiled today its answer to America's 15-year-old chess whiz, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. But a man who ought to know told the Russians to put their discovery back under wraps.
The official Government press agency, Tass, told the country about Ernest Kim, a 5-year-old who has been slaying the chess giants in his home town of Tashkent in Central Asia.
The child has trounced adults of the third and second categories, the two lowest rungs on the chess ladder leading to grandmastership. Ernest gained a third-category rating only six months after he learned the game.
Tass sought an assessment of the situation from Mikhail Botvinnik, the Soviet player who earlier this month recaptured the world chess championship.
The boy has talent, Botvinnik noted, but he needs care. He advised that Ernest be sent off to school to develop his mind and body. He prescribed total abstinence from chess for three to five years.
[When informed about the new Russian chess star here last night, Fischer said, “If Botvinnik says Kim is good, you can believe it.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1958

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 25, 1958 - Page 73

Fischer, Reshevsky In Line for Interzonal
Bobby Fischer, the new U.S. champion, and International Grandmaster Samuel Reshevsky are eligible to represent this country. Fischer is set to go, first visiting Russia, when he has been invited for exhibition matches.

[…]

Fischer On Television
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion, gave a unique exhibition when he tackled 13 players simultaneously on television. He won 12 and drew one against Walter Harris, a 16-year-old member of the Marshall Chess Club in New York.
The games were played on WNTA, a new TV station in Newark, N.J. Sportscaster Bert Lee, who usually handles baseball games, gave the names and numbers of all the chess players.

Fischer, Reshevsky In Line for Interzonal

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, May 25, 1958 - Page 38

“Bobby Fischer, 14, wins Rosenwald, giving him U.S. Triple Crown (Open, Junior, and U.S.C.F.).”

Bobby Fischer, 14, wins Rosenwald, giving him U.S. Triple Crown

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, June 01, 1958 - Page 27

Results of televised simultaneous match
“When Bobby Fischer played simultaneous chess over the TV circuit a week ago, he won twelve out of thirteen games and drew the other. Here is the game he did not win. His opponent, Walter Harris is only 16 years old.”

Results of televised simultaneous match

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 01, 1958 - Page 37

New Russian Prodigy
The Soviet Union unveiled its answer to America's 15-year-old chess champion. Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. He is Ernest Kim, a 5-year-old prodigy who has been slaying the chess giants in his home town of Tashkent in Central Asia.
Fischer, when informed of the new Russian chess star, said, “If Botwinnik says Kim is good, you can believe it.” Fischer and Kim may meet this summer, as Bobby will spend a month in Russia on a special exhibition tour.

New Russian Prodigy

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, June 08, 1958 - Page 59, (2)

Bobby Fischer to Russia
Bobby Fischer, the young United States Chess Champion, has received a gift of two round-trip airplane tickets to Russia, and will leave soon, and may play some of the Russian masters in June and July. This may include a match with Ernest Kim, a 5 year old chess prodigy. Later, from Aug. 5 to Sept. 15, he will take part in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
The other players entered in this tournament are Tahl, Petrosian, Bronstein and Averbach from Russia; Panno, Sanquinetti and Rossetto from Argentina; Fischer and Reshevsky from the United States; Pachman and Filip from Czechoslovakia; Benko and Szabo from Hungary; Matanovic and Gligoric from Yugoslavia; Olaffson of Iceland; Neikirch of Bulgaria; Vaitonia of Canada; Cardosa of the Philippines; and Larsen or Donner will represent the Netherlands.

[…]

Bobby Fischer's move as played against Sherwin in the last U.S. championship tournament…

Bobby Fischer to Russia

The Emporia Gazette, Emporia, Kansas, Tuesday, June 10, 1958 - Page 2

“We applauded the Russian chess players a couple of years ago at the Hotel Roosevelt—as undoubtedly they will applaud our 15-year-old Bobby Fischer in Moscow this summer—but if Khruschev had tried to come here at, say, the time of the Hungarian crisis, even our vaunted Secret Service would have been hard put to defend him.”

Fischer in Moscow and Political Climate: Russian Chess Players, Khruschev and Cold War Sentiments

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 15, 1958 - Page 208

Fischer to Leave for Russia
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old chess champion of the United States, will depart Tuesday afternoon for Brussels. He is bound for Moscow to play exhibitions. Fischer is looking forward to practice before going to Portoroz to play in the interzonal tournament.

Fischer to Leave for Russia

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, June 18, 1958 - Page 46

Fischer Flies Abroad
U.S. Chess Champion, 15, to Play Matches in Moscow
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old chess champion of the United States, departed yesterday from International Airport, Idlewild, Queens, aboard a Sabena Air Lines plane bound for Brussels. It was the youngster's first trip abroad.
After a few days' stay at the Belgian capital, he will continue on to Moscow in response to an invitation from Soviet chess authorities.
Fischer is looking forward to playing against Ernest Kim, a 5-year-old Soviet chess prodigy, as well as outstanding adult competitors.
Fischer was preceded to Brussels a few days ago by his sister, Joan, a registered nurse, who taught him the moves of chess. He will join her there.

Fischer Flies Abroad

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The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, June 18, 1958 - Page 31

Boy Chess Champion Flying To Russia
NEW YORK, June 18 (UPI) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion, left by plane for the Soviet Union last night to play a series of exhibition matches.
Young Fischer said he also will participate in an international tournament in Yugoslavia Aug. 5 to Sept 15 before returning home.

Boy Chess Champion Flying To Russia

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 22, 1958 - Page 178

Yugoslav Will Second Fischer in Title Chess
Belgrade, June 21 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States Chess champion, will have a Yugoslav chess master as second in the international tournament in Portoroz, the second stage in the three-leg cycle leading to a world championship match.
The Yugoslav Chess Federation received a letter from Fischer's mother saying her 15-year-old-son would be the only entry in the tournament without a second.
The federation decided to appoint a Yugoslav master to help Fischer during the tournament. It has not been decided yet who the second will be.
Twenty-one players are entering in the tournament, including four grand masters from Russia.

Yugoslav Will Second Fischer in Title Chess

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Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, June 23, 1958 - Page 11

Fischer to Have Master as Second
BELGRADE (AP) — U.S. Chess Champion Bobby Fischer will have a Yugoslav chess master as second in the international tournament in Portoroz, the second stage in three-leg cycle leading up to a world championship match.
The Yugoslav Chess Federation received a letter from Fischer's mother saying her son, 15, would be the only entry in the tournament without a second.
The federation decided to appoint a Yugoslav master to help Fischer during the tournament.

Fischer to Have Master as Second

The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Thursday, June 26, 1958 - Page 45

Chess Champ Tours
Moscow, June 25 (UPI)— Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old American chess wizard from New York, arrived by plane Wednesday, for the start of an exhibition tour.

Chess Champ Tours

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Eau Claire Leader, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Friday, June 27, 1958 - Page 8

U.S. Chess Champ
MOSCOW (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New Yorker who is the U.S. Chess champion, spent his first day in the Russian capital visiting the Moscow Central Chess Club with his sister, Joan.
Despite the language problem, Fischer visited with some of the Russian players who will be his opponents in coming matches here.

U.S. Chess Champ

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Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 32

Visa Woes Face Yank At Russ Chess Meet
MOSCOW (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old whiz of American chess, has had little trouble with the complicated maneuvering at Moscow's Central Chess Club, but he has become ensnarled in some of the Reds' red tape.
Bobby is the Brooklyn schoolboy who won the U.S. chess championship, then won passage to Europe on a TV program. And he hasn't done anything but play chess since he got here last Wednesday.

ONLY TROUBLE is Bobby wasn't due to show up until July 20, two weeks prior to his scheduled appearance in the opening interzonal chess championships in Yugoslavia Aug. 5-15.
The Russians footed the bill for the Moscow portion of the trip and made provisions for Bobby's two-week visa. But the kid, more interested in the inside of the usually hushed and solemn chess club than in seeing the sights, blew into town more than a month ahead of time.
Bobby wants to stay around until tournament time, but one Soviet official said this presents a very complicated problem, although Bobby is certainly welcome. The official explained gravely that it may be difficult to get the extension of Bobby's visa.

MEANWHILE, AS the chess club directors hold daily meetings aimed at unraveling the legal problem, Bobby keeps showing up daily to play chess, knocking off 30 games in three or four hours every morning before the officials turn him out to get some sunshine in the afternoons.
One official threw his hands up in the air Saturday, saying “We have to throw him out every afternoon. We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby said, “I like to play. I want to play against the best they've got. Their style gets me. That's why I came here.
Bobby said he'll take on anybody and complained that all his games so far have been quickies.
Club officials said Bobby has been winning about 60 per cent of his games, but they emphasized that the games have been completely informal with no time limit and no thought behind them.

Visa Woes Face Yank At Russ Chess Meet

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 165

Bobby Fischer a Hit in Soviet Chess, Though He Made First Move Too Fast
Moscow, June 28 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old whiz kid of American chess, has had little trouble with the complicated maneuvering at Moscow's Central Chess Club but he has become ensnarled in some Soviet red tape.
Bobby is the Brooklyn schoolboy who won the United States chess championship, then won passage to Europe on a TV program. He hasn't done anything but play chess since he got here last Wednesday.
The only trouble is that Bobby wasn't due to show up until July 20, two weeks prior to his scheduled appearance in the opening interzone chess championships in Yugoslavia Aug. 5-15.
Bobby wants to stay around until tournament time, but one Soviet official said this presented a complicated problem, although Bobby is certainly welcome. The official explained that it might be difficult to get an extension of Bobby's two-week visa.
Meanwhile, as the chess club directors hold daily meetings aimed at unraveling the legal problem, Bobby keeps showing up daily to play chess. He knocks off thirty games in three or four hours every morning before the officials turn him out to get some sunshine.
One official threw his hands up today, saying “We have to throw him out every afternoon. We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby said, “I like to play. I want to play against the best they've got. Their style gets me. That's why I came here.”
Club officials said Bobby had been winning about 60 per cent of his games.
Bobby has lined up a friendly but relatively serious match with Tigran Petrosyan, a Soviet grandmaster, for Monday afternoon. But as for meeting the world champion, Mikhail Botvinnik, or the former champion, Vassily Smyslov, Bobby said, “You got to go through channels with these championship class players.”

Bobby Fischer a Hit in Soviet Chess, Though He Made First Move Too Fast

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 23

Arrives Too Early
Young American Chess Whiz Hits Moscow Snag
MOSCOW, June 28 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old whiz kid of American chess, has had little trouble with the complicated maneuvering at Moscow's Central Chess Club but he has become ensnarled in some of the Reds' red tape.
Bobby is the Brooklyn schoolboy who won the U.S. chess championship, then won passage to Europe on a TV program. And he hasn't done anything but play chess since he got here last Wednesday. Only trouble is Bobby wasn't due to show up until July 20, two weeks prior to his scheduled appearance in the opening interzonal chess championships in Yugoslavia Aug. 5-15.
The Russians footed the bill for the Moscow portion of the trip and made provisions for Bobby's two-week visa. But the kid, more interested in the inside of the usually hushed and solemn chess club than in seeing the sights, blew into town more than a month ahead of time.

VISA PROBLEM
Bobby wants to stay around until tournament time, but one Soviet official said this presents a very complicated problem, although Bobby is certainly welcome. The official explained gravely that it may be difficult to get the extension of Bobby's visa.
Meanwhile, as the chess club directors hold daily meetings aimed at unraveling the legal problem, Bobby keeps showing up daily to play chess, knocking off 30 games in three or four hours every morning before the officials turn him out to get some sunshine in the afternoons.
One official threw his hands up in the air today, saying “We have to throw him out every afternoon. We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby said, “I like to play, I want to play against the best they have got. Their style gets me. That is why I came here.”
Bobby said he'll take on anybody and complained that all his games so far have been quickies.
Club officials said Bobby has been winning about 60 per cent of his games, but they emphasized that the games have been completely informal with no time limit and no thought behind them.
Bobby has lined up a friendly but relatively serious match with Tigran Petrosyan, a Soviet grandmaster for Monday afternoon, but as for meeting world champ Mikhail Botvinnik or former champ Vassily Smyslov, Bobby said, “You got to go through channels with these championship class players.”

Young American Chess Whiz Hits Moscow Snag

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Tuesday, July 01, 1958 - Page 34

“By arriving in Moscow four weeks ahead of time for some chess matches, Bobby Fischer, of the knights and pawns, made the wrong move. The suspicious Soviet international chess masters call it the capitalistic war mongers' espionage opening.”

Capitalistic War Monger's Espionage Opening

Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, Wednesday, July 02, 1958 - Page 29

Situation wanted: A postcard from Mrs. Regina Fischer, of Brooklyn, relates, “I am the mother of Bobby Fischer, age 15, the United States Chess Champion. He has just gone to Europe for the summer to represent the United States at chess events in Belgium, Russia, Yugoslavia and possibly other countries. I would like to go on TV to try to win about $2000 to get there and be with Bobby on his chess tour—or perhaps some publication or commercial organization might be interested.”

Situation wanted: A postcard from Mrs. Regina Fischer

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The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, July 06, 1958 - Page 57

“U.S. chess wizard Bobby Fischer, just 15, is expected to make headlines out of Russia in the Van Cliburn fashion. He's a promising “sleeper” entry in the forthcoming international chess tournament there.”

U.S. Chess Wizard Bobby Fischer in Van Cliburn Fashion

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 06, 1958 - Page 66

Fischer in Moscow
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion, is in Moscow but not exactly on schedule. In fact, he was not due to arrive until July 20, when he was invited for a two-week round of exhibition matches.
This does not both Bobby at all, although his hosts are having difficulty in extending his visa, according to a report from the New York Times. Bobby shows up daily at the Central Chess Club in Moscow and knocks off 30 games or more in three or four hours every morning.
One Russian official stated, “We have to throw him out every afternoon so he can get some sunshine. We don't know what to do with him, but he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby explained, “I like to play. I want to play against the best they have. Their style gets me. That's why I came here.” Latest reports are that Bobby has been winning about 60% of his games.

Fischer In Moscow

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The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Thursday, July 10, 1958 - Page 26

Chess Champ Abroad
Belgrade, July 9. (AP) — U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn arrived here today to prepare for the World Chess Tournament in Portoroz, north Yugoslavia, Aug. 4. He plans to remain in Yugoslavia until then, playing against Yugoslav masters in warmup matches.

Chess Champ Abroad

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, July 13, 1958 - Page 169

Fischer in Belgrade Draw
Belgrade, July 12 (UPI)—Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old American chess master drew last night in thirty-seven moves with a Yugoslav international master, Brasco Janosevic.

Fischer in Belgrade Draw

The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Sunday, July 13, 1958 - Page 64

U.S. Chess Wizard Visits Yugoslavia
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia, July 12. (UPI) — Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old touring American chess whiz, tied last night in a 37-move-game with Yugoslav international master Brasco Janosevic.
Fischer was invited here by the Yugoslav chess club, to meet Yugoslav chess masters and take part in a tournament from Aug. 5 to Sept. 10. He visited Moscow previously.
Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y. is accompanied on the trip by an older sister.

U.S. Chess Wizard Visits Yugoslavia

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The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 10

Chess Wizards Draw
BELGRADE —(UPI)— American chess wizard Bobby Fischer's return game against the Yugoslav international master Janosevic ended in a draw in 44 moves Saturday. Fischer will play another two “Doubles” games before going on a tour of Slovenia.

Chess Wizards Draw

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The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 7

Experts In Draw
Belgrade, July 13 (UPI)—American chess wizard Bobby Fischer's return game against the Yugoslav international master, Janosevic, ended in a draw in 44 moves yesterday. Fischer will play another two “double” games before going on a tour of Slovenia. He has expressed a wish to play against Yugoslav champion Bora Ivkov.

Experts In Draw

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 28

Brooklynite Gains Junior Chess Title
Homestead, Fla., July 13—Undefeated in nine rounds, Raymond Weinstein, 17-year-old sophomore from Brooklyn College, emerged today as the new junior champion of the United States Chess Federation.
Twice the junior champion of the Marshall Chess Club of New York, Weinstein succeeded Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, also from Brooklyn, as title-holder.

Brooklynite Gains Junior Chess Title

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Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, Tuesday, July 15, 1958 - Page 29

Mrs. Regina Fischer, mother of 15-year-old chess champion Bobby Fischer who was unable to appear on “Do You Trust Your Wife?” because she lacks a husband, is now eligible for the show—now that it allows unattached contestants on the stand and becomes “Who Do You Trust?”…

Regina Fischer Eligible Contestant on Television Show

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 17, 1958 - Page 18, (2)

“Bobby Fischer, the U.S. national champion who also won the National Junior Championship last year, could not compete in this event this year because of his current tour of Europe.”

Bobby Fischer On Tour in Europe

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, July 20, 1958 - Page 88

U.S. Olympic Chess Team Selection
President of the U.S.C.F. Jerry G. Spann in the latest issue of “Chess Life” writes:
“I don't know whether it's Reshevsky's fine accomplishment in the Dallas tournament, or Lombardy's crushing 11—0 victory in the world's junior championship, or the breath-taking heroics of one Bobby Fischer, or the combination of all three, but what was first a hunch has now become a conviction — we can win the world's championship at the Chess Olympics in Munich this Fall!”
Spann gives as the outstanding reason for his enthusiasm the fact that an Olympic team consists of four regulars and two alternates, therefore the U.S.A. will not suffer its usual disadvantage, weakness in depth. Our top four are probably a match for any quartet in the world and the Soviet Union's fantastic bench strength will be largely worthless in this competition. The U.S.C.F. and the American Chess Foundation are jointly sponsoring this event.

★ ★ ★

The American team is to be selected from Arthur Bisguier, Robert Byrne, Donald Byrne, Larry Evans, Bobby Fischer, William Lombardy, Sam Reshevsky and James Sherwin. George Koltanowski will act as non-playing captain. The players will receive no fees, just per diem expenses, because this is purely a work of love to enhance the prestige of America and American chess.

U.S. Olympic Chess Team Selection

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 20, 1958 - Page 62

Weinstein Wins Junior Title; Remlinger Close
Raymond Weinstein, 17-year-old sophomore from Brooklyn College, is the new junior champion of the U.S. Chess Federation, succeeding Bobby Fischer, who is on a European tour.

Weinstein Wins Junior Title; Remlinger Close

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 24, 1958 - Page 6

Bobby Fischer, now in Europe, will not be on hand to defend the title he won last year but a strong field will be entered. First prize is $1000 and prize money will total $3250.

★ ★ ★

Fischer arrived in Yugoslavia on July 9 to prepare for the interzonal tournament starting there Aug. 4. He flew to Moscow June 25 in advance of the date Soviet officials expected him to arrive. Because of that fact there was no welcoming party to meet him, though a car was rushed out to the airport to pick him up after the Moscow Sports Committee heard he had landed.
During his stay in Russia on a two-week visa, Bobby did little but play chess, playing as many as 30 games in a morning. “We have to throw him out every afternoon,” said one official. “We don't know what to do with him. But he's a wonderful boy.”
Bobby was reported winning about 60 percent of his games and was meeting some of Moscow's best players, though not the very first-flighters and not in overly serious matches.
Incidentally, Bobby is paid a high tribute by Reuben Fine in the latter's newest book, “Lessons From My Games.” The veteran grand master writes, “He is the strongest 14-year-old in all chess history, better than Morphy, Capablanca, or Reshevsky at that age. He may well be a future world champion.”

Bobby Fischer Arrives in Yugoslavia

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 31, 1958 - Page 14

“U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer won the tournament last year in competition with nine other masters and many players of lesser rank. While Bobby is not expected to enter this year, most of last year's other masters are expected to reappear, as well as several others including Saul Wachs, who recently won the State Rapid Transit Championship.

Bobby Fischer Contemporary Competitors

The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, August 01, 1958 - Page 5, (2)

“What Price Child Prodigy?” Is the Question

Like violin prodigies, chess prodigies, too have their troubles. Sometimes, again like their musical counterparts, young chess masters do not develop the maturity of adults (Paul Morphy, the outstanding American chess genius, had mental troubles, and so did other grandmasters of the game). Without predicting the future, it is worth commenting on the complexities facing young Bobby Fischer, who at 14 is one of America's best chess players and one of the major 20 in the world.
Bobby recently starred in the United States title tournament, playing brilliantly, and winning a wonderful game from Arthur Bisguier, the defender. Yet no matter how well Fischer performs, his astounding capacity for chess bothers his mother and in a recent newspaper feature released by the North American Newspaper Alliance, the question is asked, “What price child prodigy?”
Here are some of the bits and pieces concerning Bobby Fischer which place him in focus as a personality and chess star—one more great Jewish master of the game: Hans Kmoch, general manager of the Manhattan Chess club, where Bobby plays a few evenings a week, says, “He's so great that he shows the same potential as the immortals Paul Morphy and Jose Capablanca. He may some day become a world champion.” Another member of the club is reported as asserting, “He's so sensitive that he used to go off and cry whenever he lost a game. He hates to lose and we sort of used to baby him around here. But he doesn't cry any more. He's growing up.”
“I've visited university guidance centers for gifted children,” his mother said. “Mostly they suggest I enroll him in a small private school, where he would get closer attention. But private schools are expensive.”
One of the teachers has placed herself on record by saying: “One thing I would suggest is that Bobby spend more time studying and less time at chess.” Paul Abramson, who also has written understandingly of Fischer, reports that Bobby plays chess while eating, keeps a board always near his bed to solve problems in chess. “It's chess, chess, chess from the minute he opens his eyes in the morning,” his mother remarks. And she reveals that Bobby owns 40 chess manuals, some in foreign languages which he has learned well enough to follow the moves. “He's not interested in anything else but chess. Where's his future? He doesn't even want to go to college.” And then, hopefully, “Maybe when he gets older he'll change, I want my Bobby to develop like other boys.”

The Boy Is Brilliant

Bobby thinks well of himself as a chess player, and no wonder. But he has the arrogance of the true master. When he was 13, he played Sammy Reshevsky (also a prodigy of his own time) and Reshevsky beat him with little effort. Still, Reshevsky remarked “that boy is brilliant; he'll go far.” And how did Fischer react to this? He was busy pointing out, to whoever would listen, where Reshevsky had made mistakes and how Reshevsky, if he had been better, would have won more quickly!
Altogether, Bobby has been playing the game for less than 8 years. When he was 6 his sister bought him a set, but he remained indifferent to the game until two years later when he saw Max Pavey, a master, playing 20 matches simultaneously at the Brooklyn Public Library. Bobby sat down at one of the boards and as soon as he made a few moves, Pavey concentrated on him. Finally, Pavey won, but after 15 minutes of hard thinking. A chess teacher named Carmen Nigro saw the game and offered to take Bobby under his wing. Soon Bobby's talents were obvious and in 1956 he won the national junior championship (he was the youngest winner in history) and tied for fourth in the U.S. Open. He was later invited to participate in the Lessing J. Rosenwald tournament and Bobby was the only player to win from Reshevsky. Hans Kmoch has said of this game, “I never saw any game played better. It was the game of the century.”
Bobby came in eighth, but won the brilliancy prize. Max Pavey came in behind Fischer.
When Bobby won the U.S open chess championship in Cleveland he beat the best American players, except for Reshevsky and Larry Evans, who did not compete. He now says it will take him ten years to become the chess champion of the world. This is a prize which comes to few masters, but Fischer is still young. He may make it. He may have problems now, and later. As a chess player, he is, however, a fascinating personality.

What Price Child Prodigy?

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, August 03, 1958 - Page 29

The Spirit of Morphy
“Proof that the spirit of Morphy still lives was furnished by a game played in the recent students' international chess tournament at Varna, Bulgaria. Mikhail Tal, Latvia, who has won the last two Russian championship tournaments, played and won against Miko Bobotsov with stirring brilliancy.
Tal sacked his Queen at move 12 and went on to prove the soundness of his combination with verve and elan. The New York Times said: “So enthusiastic were some of the spectators that they did not hesitate to classify the brilliant effort with a similar feat by Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn here in the Rosenwald trophy tournament of two years ago. On that occasion Fischer defeated Donald Byrne with courageous tactics that were evidence of the genius that was later to assert itself.”
Tal and Fischer will meet in the interzonal tournament beginning Aug. 5 at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.”

The Spirit of Morphy

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The Logan Daily News, Logan, Ohio, Monday, August 04, 1958 - Page 2

U.S. Boy, 15, Seeks World Chess Crown
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP) — Beginning here Tuesday Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old United States chess champion, and James T. Sherwin, 24, a Manhattan attorney, will compete against the leading chess masters of the world.
In a field of twenty-one, they will play in the International Chess Federation's interzonal tournament leading up to the challengers' semifinal for the world championship, now held by Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia.

U.S. Boy, 15, Seeks World Chess Crown

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 06, 1958 - Page 28

Fischer Plays Draw In Yugoslav Chess
Twenty-one players, representing twelve countries, began play in the interzonal tournament sponsored by the International Chess Federation in Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia last night.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States champion, made his international debut in a closely fought match with O. Neikirch of Bulgaria. The encounter resulted in a creditable draw. Fischer had the white pieces.
The game between James T. Sherwin of New York, 24-year-old Columbia graduate, and Tigran Petrosian of Russia, was adjourned after forty moves. The position was regarded as even.
Mikhail Tal, national Soviet champion, and Pan Benko of Hungary were the sole winners. Four games were drawn and four adjourned.

Fischer Plays Draw In Yugoslav Chess

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Wednesday, August 06, 1958 - Page 18 (2)

U.S. Chess Open Now in Progress
Nearly 160 entrants are playing the U.S. Chess Open at Rochester, Minnesota. The event, sponsored and hosted by IBM, will continue through August 16th. Each contestant will meet 12 opponents, in games played at the rate of one each day, except Sunday, August 10th.
Defending champion Bobby Fischer, 15 year old prodigy from Brooklyn, is in Europe preparing for the World's Candidates Tournament, so a new champion will be crowned at Rochester next week. A prize fund of $3200 guarantee the winner $1000 with lesser amounts and trophies to the lower positions.
The tournament is a 12-round Swiss system tournament, with winners meeting winners and losers playing losers. This system almost always produces climatic results as the strongest players meet each other in the final rounds.

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Wednesday, August 06, 1958 - Page 18

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 07, 1958 - Page 32

Tal Defeats Szabo In Yugoslav Chess
Mikhail Tal of Moscow gained his second consecutive victory in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz and led the field of twenty-one, according to a report received last night from Yugoslavia.
Tal defeated Szabo of Hungary in forty-nine moves. The Soviet grandmaster played the Sicilian defense.
The only other second-round victor was Bobby Fischer 15-year-old United States champion, who won on the black side of a king's Indian defense from Geza Fuster of Toronto.
The American lad was not at his best in the opening. He lost a pawn during a time scramble, but an oversight on the part of Fuster cost him a clear knight. Fischer scored in thirty-six moves.
James T. Sherwin of New York, the other American representative, whose adjourned first-round game with Tigran Petrosian of Russia was held over until today, drew a bye.

Tal Defeats Szabo In Yugoslav Chess

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, August 07, 1958 - Page 6

“A touch of drama will be provided by the first meeting ever between the 22-year-old Mikhail Tal, Russian champion for two years running, and Bobby Fischer, American champion at only 15. One cannot see Fischer doing really well on his first appearance in Europe, but he clearly has a great future.
Both Tal and Fischer have been preparing intensively for Portoroz in the last month. Tal was unbeaten in helping Russia to retain the world students' championship, and Fischer has been playing training games in Yugoslavia. Here is one recent game by each of them, a convincing attack by the Russian and a deep queen sacrifice (spoiled by time pressure) by the American.”

A Touch of Drama: Fischer vs. Tal

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 08, 1958 - Page 12

Tal In First Place
Russian Leads in Interzonal Chess in Yugoslavia
Eight adjourned games were played off last night in the first and second rounds of the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia. Mikhail Tal of Russia is in first place with a 2-0 score.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, and Pal Benko, Hungary, were tied at 1½—½ by Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland and Tigran Petrosian of Russia, both of whom won their unfinished games.
Petrosian won his first-round game from James T. Sherwin of New York in fifth-eight moves of a Queen's Gambit. Olafsson beat Laszlo Szabo of Hungary in forty-two moves.

Tal In First Place

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The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Friday, August 08, 1958 - Page 31

American Chess Player Tied For Second In Meet
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 7. —Soviet grand master Mikhail Talj today held the lead in the interzonal chess championships with the first two rounds completed.
Bobby Fischer of New York, 15-year-old international master of the United States, shared second place with Soviet grand master Tigrano Petrosyan, international master Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, and Paul Benkoe, Hungarian-born member of the U.S. Chess Federation.
The third round will be played tomorrow.
Standings after second round: Talj, 2 points; Fischer, Olafsson, Petrosyan and Benkoe 1½ points.

American Chess Player Tied For Second In Meet

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 09, 1958 - Page 19

Tal and Pachman Draw In 50 Moves
“The 15-year-old United States champion, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, engaged in a lively encounter with Hector Rossetto of Buenos Aires, who had the black side of a Ruy Lopez. Play was adjourned after 42 moves.”

Tal and Pachman Draw In 50 Moves

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 10, 1958 - Page 65

Fischer, Sherwin In Interzonal Chess
The Interzonal Tournament of the International Chess Federation started in Portoroz, Yugoslavia, with 21 players representing 12 countries, according to a report from the New York Times.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States chess champion, made his international debut in a closely fought match with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria. The encounter resulted in a creditable draw. Fischer had the white pieces.

Fischer, Sherwin In Interzonal Chess

Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, August 10, 1958 - Page 32

“Bobby Fischer, present champion, is bowling them over in Europe and will not defend his title.”

Bobby Fischer in Europe, Will Not Defend Title

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, August 11, 1958 - Page 26

Fischer, Sherwin Set Back In Chess
Both American entries were defeated last night in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report form Yugoslavia.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States champion, lost with the black pieces to Pal Benko, a Hungarian refugee who reached the United States by way of Iceland a year ago.
Laszlo Szabo, who has been for many years the leading exponent of the game in Hungary, defeated James T. Sherwin of New York. Sherwin has yet to score. Fischer has a score of 1½-1½, with one game adjourned.
The only other fourth-round winners were Tigran Petrosian and Yuri Auerbach of Russia. Petrosian took the lead with 3-1. Benko, 2½-½, is tied with Mikhail Tal, Soviet grandmaster, who adjourned in the fourth round with Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia.

Fischer, Sherwin Set Back In Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, August 12, 1958 - Page 38

Fischer Gets Draw In Interzonal Chess
Adjourned games from the third and fourth rounds were completed last night in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
Two Russians, Yuri Auerbach and Tigran Petrosian, lead the field, each with a score of 3—1. Auerbach took his third-round match with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria after 41 moves.
Pal Benko of Hungary remained in third place. Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion, suffered his first defeat and fell to a six-way tie for fourth place at 2½—1½.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the United States champion, played a third-round draw with Hector Rossetto of Argentina in 73 moves. Fischer won a pawn but had to give up a rook for another pawn about to reach the eighth rank.
James T. Sherwin of New York won his third-round game from Boris deGreif of Colombia in 49 moves. Sherwin had a queen and two united passed pawns against a rook and two minor pieces.

Fischer Gets Draw In Interzonal Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 13, 1958 - Page 35

Russians Keep Lead
Auerbach and Petrosian Win in Interzonal Chess
Yuri Auerbach and Tigran Petrosian of Russia won their fifth-round games yesterday to retain the lead in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to reports from Yugoslavia.
Auerbach defeated Hector Rossetto of Argentina, while Petrosian won from Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia.
Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion, defeated Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia to tie at 3½—1½ with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who outplayed Rodolfo Cardoso of the Philippines.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, had a bye. James T. Sherwin of New York adjourned with Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia.

Russians Keep Lead: Auerbach and Petrosian Win in Interzonal Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 33

Fischer Near Draw In Bronstein Match
Although under severe time pressure, Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old United States chess champion, stood up to David Bronstein of Russia in the sixth round of the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia last night.
Forty-one moves were recorded before adjournment. At the time Fischer was on even terms with his famous opponent, who once played a tie match with Mikhail Botvinnik for the world championship.
The American youngster had the white pieces in a Ruy Lopez. At no point was he out-maneuvered. When play ceased, each had a rook, bishop and pawn and a draw was predicted. Fischer's tournament score is 2—2. against Bronstein's 2½—1½.
James T. Sherwin of New York did not fare so well on the black side of a Sicilian defense against Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia, who earlier won from Fischer. Sherwin resigned after thirty-seven moves.
Tigran Petrosian of Russia held first place with 4½—1½ after a thirteen-move Queen's Pawn opening with Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia.

Fischer Near Draw In Bronstein Match

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 38

Bobby Fischer isn't finding it all peaches and cream in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia. After four rounds he is doing no better than a tie for 10th place in the 21-man field with a 2-2 score. He has lost to Pal Benko, Hungarian-American refugee, and drawn with Hector Rossetto, of Argentina, and Fridrik Olafsson, of Iceland.

Bobby Fischer at Interzonal, Portoroz, Yugoslavia

The Lincoln Star, Lincoln, Nebraska, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 21

Chess Round Ends
Porotoroz, Yugoslavia (AP) — The 6th round of the Interzonal Chess Tournament for world championship ended Wednesday night with Soviet grand master Tigran Petrosyan strengthening his lead.
Bobby Fischer, New York's 15-year-old international master, played against world renowned Soviet grand master David Bronstein. But the name of his famous opponent did not impress Fischer who again proved his skill while playing under pressure of time. The match was adjourned with prospects of ending in a draw.

Chess Round Ends

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 26

Fischer, Bronstein Deadlock In Chess
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn and David Bronstein of Russia played to a draw in sixty-two moves in a game that had been adjourned from the sixth round in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report last night from Yugoslavia.
The 15-year-old United States champion then had a score of 2½—2½ and is on even terms with such masters as Oscar Panno of Argentina, Laszlo Szabo of Hungary and Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia. Bronstein is only half a point ahead of the youngster.
Bronstein had another session in his fifth-round game with Pal Benko of Hungary, in which fifty-nine moves have been recorded. Benko, still undefeated, has a score of 3½—½ and Bronstein has 3—2. The Hungarian has had his bye.
When the results of the other adjourned games had been recorded, Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland and Tigran Petrosian of Russia had totals of 4½—1½ apiece. Olafsson beat Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.
Bent Larsen of Denmark, with a score of 4—2, was tied with two Russians, Yuri Auerbach and Mikhail Tal.

Fischer, Bronstein Deadlock In Chess

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 7

“Even the youthful Bobby Fischer, who only a few minutes before was mated by Benko and was on the verge of crying, found here some consolation for his misery and started to laugh.


As for the youngest player, the much advertised American Bobby Fischer, his chess so far has been disappointing. Although he has played the weakest opposition—if one is permitted to talk about “weakness” at this tournament—he has scored only one win and that from a lost position against Fuster, who, pressed by time, made a terrible blunder.

Fierce Chess Encounters at Portoroz Meet

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The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 29

Youth Draws Bronstein in Chess Match
POROTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 14 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old international master from New York, drew against the famous Soviet grand master David Bronstein after 59 moves in the international chess tournament today.
The more experienced Soviet master tried without success to crush Fischer, who defended himself excellently.
After six complete rounds, Iceland's international master Fridrick Olaafson and Soviet grand master Tigran Petrosyan led 19 other world ranking players. Each had 4.5 points. Fischer was down the list with 2.5 points.
Paul Benko, Hungarian refugee now a member of the U.S. Chess Federation, defeated Soviet grand master Yuriy Averbach. Benko, considered the biggest surprise of the tournament, still has to play his adjourned fifth round match with Bronstein.
James Sherwin, U.S. international master, surrendered to grand master Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia after 66 moves in their fifth round adjourned match.

Youth Draws Bronstein in Chess Match

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 16, 1958 - Page 14

Fischer, Auerbach Draw In 31 Moves
Surviving another great test in the interzonal tournament of the International Chess Federation at Portoroz, Bobby Fischer drew in the seventh round against Yuri Auerbach of Russia, according to a report last night from Yugoslavia.
The Soviet grandmaster had the initiative and choice of opening but could make no headway against the 15-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn. They agreed to a draw after thirty-one moves. Fischer, with a score of 3—3, remained in a tie for thirteenth place with Laszlo Szabo of Hungary.
The other American, James T. Sherwin of New York, played white against Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia. They also drew in thirty-one moves.
Of the ten games scheduled, seven were drawn and one was adjourned. The others were won by Tigran Petrosian of Russia and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina. Petrosian's victory placed him at the head of the standing with 5½—1½
Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who has a chance to overtake the leader, adjourned his game with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria after forty-one moves.

Fischer, Auerbach Draw In 31 Moves

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 197

Fischer Off Form In Debut Abroad
But U.S. Champion, 15, Holds Own in Yugoslav Chess—Scores Are Listed
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old United States champion, has been holding his own, although not quite playing at the top of his form at the international chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
After a well-played draw with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria in the first round, he took a point from Geza Fuster of Canada in the second. Here he enjoyed a bit of good fortune, according to the details which have reached here.
Fischer, making his international debut, was a pawn behind and the outlook was unpromising, when, during a scramble against time, he managed to set a trap. Fuster fell into it, lost a clear knight and was forced to resign.
Another draw, against Hector Rossetto of Argentina, followed and then came Fischer's first and only defeat, by Pal Benko of Hungary, in the fourth round. After a bye in the fifth, he encountered David Bronstein of Russia in the sixth. After two sessions, the man who played a tie match with Mikhail Botvinnik for the world championship, was unable to make any headway against the clever young Brooklynite who halved the point.
The scores of two of these games by Fischer are included in the following selection received by airmail. Two specimens by Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion, are also shown.

Fischer Off Form In Debut Abroad

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 197

Chess Champion Receives Praise
Cobo-Arteaga of Havana Is Honored After Winning U.S. Open Laurels
Rochester, Minn, Aug. 16—Eldis Cobo-Arteaga of Havana, who won the open championship of the United States Chess Federation last night was honored at a luncheon today.
Jerry Spann of Oklahoma city, Federation president, praised the Cuban for his accomplishment in outranking most of the top players of this country.
Spann brought out some of the champion's background, which includes drawn games with Samuel Reshevsky and Larry Evans in the Havana international tournament of 1952. In the team tournament at Helsinki, he was Cuba's No. 3 player and made a score of 8—6.
Cobo-Arteaga succeeds Bobby Fischer, who is playing at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.

Chess Champion Receives Praise

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 52

“One of Benko's wins is the first loss sustained by Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old U.S. chess champion. Bobby has a 2-2 score, including a win against Geza Fuster of Canada, and draws with Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria and Hector Rossetto of Argentina.
A report from Yugoslavia indicates Fischer is having difficulties with fans and newsmen, who are naturally attracted to the chess prodigy. He has requested help from the authorities, stating that he can not concentrate on his game with a crowd around his table.

Bobby Fischer Difficulties with Fans and Newsmen

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 197

Fischer Defeats Larsen In Chess
U.S. Champion Beats Dane in Yugoslavia—Petrosian and Gligoric Draw
The score of Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, was lifted last night to 4-3 when he defeated Bent Larsen, Denmark's leading player, in the eighth round of the interzonal tournament sponsored by the International Chess Federation at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
It was the second victory for the 15-year-old Brooklyn student, who conducted the white pieces against the Dane.
His first success had been gained at the expense of Geza Fuster of Toronto in the second round. Because of a bye in the fifth, Fischer has played seven games, of which four were drawn.
Tigran Petrosian of Russia, leading with a score of 6—2, was held to a draw by Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, who played white.

Fischer Defeats Larsen In Chess

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Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 34

A Bashful Chess Whiz's Exit Fizzes
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 16 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, United States wonder kid, Saturday won his match against the Danish grand master, Bent Larsen, at the International chess tournament.
The 15 year old American international chess master received strong applause after his success.
The publicity shy boy tried to escape from the big tournament hall by a side way. But he was caught by hundreds of chess fans who wanted his autograph.
Fischer's performance Saturday was considered the best in his short international career.
Playing White against Larsen, who used a Sicilian defense, the Brooklyn high school lad boldly sacrificed a pawn and quality in order to get more room for his well planned attack.
Larsen gave up after 30 moves.

A Bashful Chess Whiz's Exit Fizzes

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 36

International Chess
“Twenty-one players are contesting in the international chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia. The American entries are not doing too well. Bobby Fischer, at present writing, has won 1½ and lost 1½. James Sherwin has yet to lose a game.

International Chess

Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 8 ()

“Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, over Danish Grand Master Bent Larsen in International Chess Tournament in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.”

Who Won?

Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 18

Fine Exhibition
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old international master from New York gave another fine exhibition of his chess skills Friday in the interzonal tournament.
Bobby drew with the Soviet's former champion, grand master Yuriy Averbach, in their seventh round match. The match ended in 21 moves.

Fine Exhibition

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 32

Fischer Wins Again In Interzone Chess
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess champion of the United States, defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in the ninth round of the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia last night. The South American was outplayed in a twenty-eight move Sicilian defense.
It was Fischer's second consecutive victory. It landed him in a tie for sixth place, at 5—3, with Yuri Auerbach of Russia.
Tigran Petrosian of Russia, who drew against Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria, kept the lead with a score of 6½-2½; Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion, was second with 6—3 after winning from Geza Fuster of Canada.
Ninth-round results:

Fischer Wins Again In Interzone Chess

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The Atlanta Constitution Atlanta, Georgia Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 13

Fischer Wins Chess Title
Yugoslavia (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess champion from Brooklyn, Tuesday defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in the ninth round of the interzonal chess tournament.
Playing black, Fischer played a Sicilian defense against international master Sanguinetti. Fischer played a brilliant match and Sanguinetti gave up after 28 moves.

Fischer Wins Chess Title

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The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 10

Young Chess Wizard Trails Soviet Player
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, August 20 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, drew with the young Argentinian grand master, Oscar Panno in the interzonal chess tournament today. But the youthful American still trailed pace setting Mikhail Talj of Russia by 1.5 points.
Bobby and Panno drew after 21 moves in a Sicilian defense game.
Hungarian refugee Paul Benko, now a member of the U.S. Chess Federation, drew with Iceland's Fridrik Olafsson.
James Sherwin of the U.S. also played a draw with Bulgaria's Oleg Neikirkh. Their match ended after 24 hours.
After 10 rounds of the 21-round tournament, Talj led the field with seven points. Benkoe had six with one adjourned match. Fischer had 5.5 points, Sherwin was far down with two points and one adjourned match.

Young Chess Wizard Trails Soviet Player

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 28

Tal Takes Chess Lead
Russian Defeats Rossetto at Portoroz—Fischer in Draw
Mikhail Tal, national chess champion of Russia, gained the lead in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia last night.
The Russian, on the black side of a King's Indian defense, scored in thirty-nine moves over Hector Rossetto of Argentina for a 7-3 won-lost score.
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States champion, and James T. Sherwin both drew their tenth-round games against Oscar Panno of Argentina and Otto Neikirch of Bulgaria, respectively.

Tal Takes Chess Lead

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 34

Bobby Fischer Doing Extremely Well with 4-3 Score
Cobo-Arteaga succeeds Bobby Fischer, who is playing in the interzonal tournament in Yugoslavia and could not defend the title he won last year.

Bobby Fischer, in his first tournament against the class of competition he is meeting now, was doing extremely well and had a score of 4-3 with one bye. He has played seven games, drawing four and winning from Bent Larsen, Denmark's grandmaster, and Geza Fuster, of Canada. He has lost only to Benko. He drew not only with Auerbach but with David Bronstein, another Soviet grandmaster and erstwhile challenger of Botvinnik for the world's championship, a match which ended in a tie.

Bobby Fischer Doing Extremely Well with 4-3 Score

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, August 22, 1958 - Page 3

Petrosian leading in interzonal chess tournament
“Some other masters have improved a lot, none more than the youngest one, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer. In the last five rounds he played four grandmasters and one of the best outsiders and score 3½ points — a tremendous feat.

Petrosian leading in interzonal chess tournament

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 23, 1958

Sherwin Triumphs, Fischer Adjourns
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion from Brooklyn, and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland adjourned their eleventh-round match in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report last night from Yugoslavia. It was the only game of the ten scheduled that was not finished. The players adjourned after forty-one moves.
The Icelander was thought to have a slight advantage in position, but with a somewhat difficult ending ahead. Both were under time pressure. Olafsson had the white side of a Sicilian defense.
James T. Sherwin of New York defeated Geza Fuster of Canada in a Reti opening, played by Sherwin, in forty-three moves. Sherwin went ahead after gaining the advantage of two exchanges.

Sherwin Triumphs, Fischer Adjourns

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Saturday, August 23, 1958 - Page 28

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, a chess whiz kid, and Fridrick Olafsson of Iceland, adjourned their match Friday in Portoraz, Yugoslavia…

Bobby Fischer and Fridrick Olafsson Adjourn

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 222

Fischer Adjourns, Shunning A Draw
Aggressiveness on both sides marked the play between the chess champions of the United States and Russia in the twelfth round of the interzone tournament at Portoroz, according to a report received last night from Yugoslavia.
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old from Brooklyn, adopted the Ruy Lopez against Mikhail Tal of Moscow and held his own throughout the opening and middle game until he appeared to have a slight advantage.
While Tal was content to draw, the American preferred to play on, but was short of time. In the opinion of experts, he should have been content with a certain half point.
Playing on, his grip on the position slackened and, when play stopped, the Russian had by no means worse prospects. Tal, with an 8—3 score, remained in second place. Tigran Petrosian held first with 9—3 after a draw with Pal Benko, Hungary, in twenty-one moves. Fischer, 5½—3½, and two adjourned, was tenth in the standing.
James T. Sherwin of New York, on the black side of a Sicilian defense with Hector Rossetto of Buenos Aires, adjourned in an even position after forty-one moves.
A seventeen-move draw between Yuri Auerbach, Russia, and Oscar Panno, Argentina, enabled the Soviet grandmaster to take third place with 7½—3½.

Fischer Adjourns, Shunning A Draw

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Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 7

Yank Youth, Soviet Halt Chess Match
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, August 23 (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York and Russian champion Mikhail Tal tangled in one of the most exciting matches of the interzone chess tournament Saturday without reaching a decision. Their 12th round match was adjourned by Fischer.
For a long time the position was balanced and both masters played for victory. At one time Fischer had a draw but he didn't want it. Experts, however, believe the young American should have contented himself with a draw and believe that now Fischer will have to fight for draw.
The Soviet masters are known for excellent domestic analysis of adjourned matches. They have several seconds who do the job for them. Fischer also has a second but he is away attending the chess federation congress and Bobby will have to do his own analyzing.
Hungarian refugee Paul Benkoe, playing for the U.S. Chess Federation, drew with Soviet master Tigran Petrosyan after 21 moves.
James Sherwin of the U.S. and Hector Rossetto of Argentina also played an adjourned match with the probability it will end in a draw.

Yank Youth, Soviet Halt Chess Match

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 58

“Bobby Fischer has drawn with Bronstein, the Russian master, and his score is now 4-3. Sherwin's score at present writing is 1½-5½.

Fischer Bronstein Draw

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 30

Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old U.S. champion, improved his standing with a good victory over Bent Larsen of Denmark. Fischer has 4-3, including draws with two of the top Russian representatives, David Bronstein and Yuri Auerbach.
James T. Sherwin of New York has found the going much heavier. He has 1½-5½, scoring but one draw against Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia in this week's play. Sherwin lost to Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia and Rodolfo Cardoso of the Philippine Islands.

Bobby Fischer, 15-Year-Old U.S. Champion Improves Standing with Victory over Bent Larsen

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 49

Bobby Fischer Not Competing in 1958 U.S. Open at Rochester, Minn.
Bobby Fischer was unable to defend his U.S. Open title this year at Rochester, Minn., because of a previous engagement in the 1958 FIDE Interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia. Fischer and James Sherwin are representing the United States of America in this penultimate link in the challenger's chain. Sherwin replaced Reshevsky who originally qualified and later withdrew.
Despite the absence of Fischer, Sherwin and Reshevsky (among others) the Rochester Open drew a strong and distinguished field. Although such renowned masters as Larry Evans, Arthur Bisguier, Donald Byrne, Robert Steinmeyer and Robert Byrne competed the 1958 Open was won by outsider Eldis Cobo-Arteaga.

Bobby Fischer Not Competing in 1958 U.S. Open at Rochester, Minn.

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, August 25, 1958

Fischer, Russian Play Chess Draw
Match Against Tal Ends in 41 Moves After Olafsson Beats Brooklyn Youth
Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old chess champion of the United States, lost one adjourned game and drew another in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, according to a report last night from Yugoslavia.
Fischer, from Brooklyn, lost his eleventh-round game to Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in forty-four moves. It was a difficult ending in which Fischer went astray under time pressure.
The setback was his second in this tournament. The Icelander thereby passed Fischer in the standing.
Next, Fischer returned to his twelfth-round game with Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion. Although the Russian seemed to have an advantage, he agreed to a draw after forty-one moves without resuming play.
Tal remained in second place with a score of 8½—3½, while Tigran Petrosian of Russia, 9—3, continued in the lead. Olafsson was defeated by David Bronstein of Russia in the twelfth round in forty-six moves.
James T. Sherwin of New York won in the twelfth round from Hector Rossetto of Buenos Aires in forty-five moves. Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia defeated Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia.

Fischer, Russian Play Chess Draw

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Monday, August 25, 1958 - Page 7

New Yorker, 15, Defeats Soviet Chess Champion
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, marked up another victory in the interzonal tournament Sunday when he defeated Soviet Champion Mikhail Talj in an adjourned 15th round match.
Fischer, who declined yesterday to play for a draw, was not in a good position at the start of today's play. But he forced the play and came through with a victory.
The youthful New Yorker, however, had to give up in his 11th round adjourned match with Iceland's Fridrik Olafsson after 44 moves.
James Sherwin, U.S. international master who got off to a bad start in the tournament, chalked up his third straight victory. He defeated Argentine Hestor Rossetto after 45 moves in their 12th round adjourned game.
After the 12th round, Russian players continued to dominate play. Tigran Petrosyan held first place with nine points. Fischer trailed far down with six, a half-point back of Paul Benkoe, Hungarian refugee playing for the U.S. Chess Federation. Sherwin had five points.

New Yorker, 15, Defeats Soviet Chess Champion

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Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Tuesday, August 26, 1958 - Page 10

American Boy Beats Russian Chess Champ
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug. 25 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, marked up another victory in the interzonal tournament Sunday when he defeated Soviet champion Mikhail Talj in an adjourned 12th round match.
Fischer, who declined Saturday to play for a draw, was not in a good position at the start of play. But he forced the play and came through with a victory.

American Boy Beats Russian Chess Champ

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New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 28, 1958 - Page 24

Fischer, Russian Adjourn In Chess
13th-Round Petrosian Match Halted After 41 Moves—Feuerstein Triumphs

Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old United States champion, and Tigran Petrosian of Russia adjourned in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia last night.
Play was halted after forty-one moves in a difficult end-game position. Fischer resorted to the King's Indian defense. Petrosian, with a score of 9—3, retained the lead.
Another Russian grandmaster, Mikhail Tal, is second with 9—4. He drew in nineteen moves with David Bronstein of Russia. The latter played the Nimzo-Indian defense, in which queens were exchanged early.

Fischer, Russian Adjourn In Chess

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Saturday, August 30, 1958 - Page 12

Chess Youth Surprises
Porotoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 29 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New York chess wizard, again surprised the masters today when he drew with Soviet grand master Tigran Petrosyan in their thirteen-round adjourned interzonal tournament match.

Chess Youth Surprises

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 28, 1958 - Page 24

“With the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, approximately at the halfway mark, Bobby Fischer remains in a contending position and is playing extremely well.
The 15-year-old U.S. champion scored perhaps his finest victory yet in the tournament when he defeated Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion, in the 12th round.
This match was adjourned after 41 moves, with Tal offering a draw at that stage although seeming to have a slight advantage. But Bobby refused the offer, took the initiative when play was resumed, and turned apparent defeat into triumph.
Unfortunately, Bobby suffered his second defeat of the tournament in the preceding round, when he went astray under time pressure against Fridrik Olafsson, of Iceland, and lost in 44 moves. Of course it is no disgrace to lose to Olafsson, one of the strongest players in the game today.
Fischer drew in the 10th round against Oscar Panno of Argentina. With 11 games under his belt, he stands 6½-4½ to rank among the top seven or eight players in the tournament. A more exact ranking is impossible because of the number of adjourned games various players have to complete.

15-year-old U.S. champion scored perhaps his finest victory yet

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 29, 1958 - Page 26

Tal And Auerbach Draw In 19 Moves
Petrosian-Bronstein Match in 14th Round Adjourned in Interzonal Chess

Mikhail Tal and Tigran Petrosian, Russian grandmasters, remained first and second, respectively, in the standing at the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, after the fourteenth round, according to a report received last night through Yugoslav news sources.
Tal played a short draw of nineteen moves with Yuri Auerbach, another Soviet grandmaster, who is third in the race. Petrosian adjourned a hard-fought session with David Bronstein of Russia after forty-one moves. The likelihood is that it will end in a draw.
The two Americans, Bobby Fischer and James T. Sherwin, both of New York, were paired, and played for forty-one moves of a Ruy Lopez until adjournment time. Fischer had the white pieces.
The fourteenth-round winners were Ludek Pachman, Czechoslovakia; Laszlo Szabo, Hungary; Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, and Oscar Panno, Argentina.

Tal And Auerbach Draw In 19 Moves

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 30, 1958 - Page 09

Petrosian Leads Interzonal Chess
Draws With Bronstein and Fischer to Overtake Tal—Sherwin in Deadlock

Tigran Petrosian took the lead last night in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, according to a report received here.
In adjourned games of the thirteenth and fourteenth rounds the Russian grandmaster drew with Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old United States champion, in sixty-seven moves and agreed to a draw with David Bronstein of Russia without resuming play.
A difficult rook-and-pawn ending brought a dramatic close to the contest with Fischer.
Petrosian, with a score of 10—4, replaced the Russian champion, Mikhail Tal, 9½—4½, in first place.
Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland moved into third place after winning his thirteenth-round game from Yuri Auerbach of Russia in fifty-nine moves.
James T. Sherwin of New York drew with Pal Benko, Hungary, in sixty-eight moves by repetition under time pressure. Sherwin then resumed play with Fischer in their fourteenth-round match. It was again adjourned in a rook ending, in which Fischer was a pawn ahead.
Oscar Panno of Argentina and Bent Larsen of Denmark drew in 100 moves.

Petrosian Leads Interzonal Chess: Draws With Bronstein and Fischer to Overtake Tal—Sherwin in Deadlock

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 136

Tal Beats Larsen In 24-Move Match
Ties Fellow Soviet Player, Petrosian, for Lead in Tourney at Portoroz

By means of a vigorous attack against the Sicilian defense set up by Bent Larsen of Denmark, Mikhail Tal of Russia won their fifteenth-round match in twenty-four moves in the interzonal chess tournament at Portoroz, according to a report received last night from Yugoslavia.
Tal tied Tigran Petrosian of Russia for first place in the tourney, each with a score of 10½—4½.
Petrosian was paired with Yuri Auerbach, a Soviet grandmaster, who countered with a Nimzo-Indian defense. They agreed to a draw in twenty-two moves.
Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia outplayed Geza Fuster of Canada on the white side of a Sicilian defense after thirty-six moves. The winner tied Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, for third place at 9—3. Olafsson adjourned with Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old United States champion, twelfth in the standing, won from Boris de Greif of Colombia, who played white against a Sicilian defense. The South American sacrificed a piece to gain the initiative, but the young American put up a sound defense. Overstepping the time limit, de Greif lost in thirty-five moves. James T. Sherwin of New York adopted the English opening against David Bronstein of Russia. The American stood up stoutly against the famous Russian until he lost his grip under the pressure of the time limit. He lost a piece and exceeded the time limit after thirty-nine moves. Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia also was a winner.

Tal Beats Larsen In 24-Move Match

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 136

Six Will Qualify For Chess Event
Conditions Are Modified for Challengers' Tourney to Be Held in 1959

Instead of the five of the twenty-one players engaged in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz advancing into the challengers' tournament next year, six will qualify, according to the latest news received from the meeting of the International Chess Federation at Dubrovnik in Yugoslavia.
William Lombardy of New York, the world junior champion, who has been acting as second to the United States champion, Bobby Fischer, at Portoroz, is the authority for this information. He took time off to represent the United States at the meeting in Dubrovnik.
Mrs. Violet Pavey of Brooklyn, widow of the late Max Pavey, yesterday confirmed the appointment of Lombardy as U.S. delegate. When informed of the change in the conditions of qualifying at Portoroz, she said it would favor the chances of Fischer to finish among the first six.
In the meantime, Fischer has been holding his own at Portoroz, where he had made a plus score by the time the halfway mark was reached.
Additional specimens of his play have arrived here and are included in the following selection received here from Yugoslavia:

Six Will Qualify For Chess Event: Conditions Are Modified for Challengers' Tourney to Be Held in 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 43

“U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old schoolboy from Brooklyn, earned 2 points of his four games last week to maintain his plus score in the tournament. He defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in the ninth round in a 28-move Sicilian Defense.
In the 10th round Fischer drew against Oscar Panno of Argentina. The boy then suffered his second loss to Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in a difficult ending in which time pressure was an important factor. Fischer then succeeded in drawing with Tal after the Russian obtained an early advantage.

Fischer In Belgrade
Bobby Fischer spent several weeks in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, before the start of the Interzonal Tournament. During that period he engaged in two practice matches with Yugoslavia masters.
Fischer defeated Matulovic by 2½-1½. Against Janosevic, the result was two draws. One of the latter games follows. It was an exciting battle in which each contestant missed opportunities.

Fischer In Belgrade

The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 3

Yankee Boy Moves Up in Chess Tourney
Portoroz, Yugoslavia (AP) —Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York improved his chances of qualifying for the world chess championship yesterday when he defeated Columbia's Boris De Greff in a 15th round interzonal tournament match.
The top six in the interzonal play qualify for the world tournament. Fischer, picking up a full point, has 7.5 points with one adjourned match to be completed and six more rounds to go.
Two Soviet masters, Mikhail Talj and Tigran Petrosyan, lead with 10.5 points.
Fischer played boldly against De Greff and forced the Columbian to give up in the 35th move.

Yankee Boy Moves Up in Chess Tourney

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 28

U.S. Chess Star Wins Tourney Trial Match
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Aug 30. (AP)—Fifteen year old Bobby Fischer of New York Saturday improved his chances of qualifying for the world chess tournament when he defeated Columbia's Boris De Greff in a 15th round interzonal tournament match.
The top six in the interzonal play qualify for the world meet. Fischer, picking up a full point, has 7.5 points with one adjourned match to be completed and six more rounds to go.
Two soviet masters, Mikhail Talj and Tigran Petrosyan, lead with 10.5 points
James Sherwin of New York was defeated by David Bronstein, soviet grand master.

U.S. Chess Star Wins Tourney Trial Match

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 63 (2)

“Bobby Fischer, 15 year old entry from the United States, has with Mikhail Tal, the Soviet champion, just completed a drawn game, and now has a score of 6.5.”

Bobby Fischer Completes Drawn Game with Mikhail Tal

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 6

U.S. Boy, 15, Gains In Try at Chess Title
Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Aug. 30 (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York improved his chances of qualifying for the world chess championship today when he defeated Colombia's Boris De Greff in a 15th-round interzonal tournament match.
The top six in the interzonal play qualify for the world tournament. Fischer, picking up a full point, has 7.5 points with one adjourned match to be completed and six more rounds to go.
Two Soviet masters, Mikhail Talj and Tigran Petrosian, lead with 10.5 points.

U.S. Boy, 15, Gains In Try at Chess Title

Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 24 (2)

“Fischer and Sherwin are representing the United States. From the looks of things young Bobby is doing all right for himself in this battle of giants. Your editor hereby climbs out on a limb and predicts that Fischer will not only qualify for the Candidates Tournament, but that he will also win that event and play Botvinnik for the world championship. Further deponents sayeth not.

Out On A Limb With Great Tournament Predictions: Fischer in Yugoslavia

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The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Monday, September 01, 1958 - Page 2

Yankee Gains Half-Point in Chess Tourney
POROTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old New Yorker, picked up a half-point in the interzonal chess tournament Sunday when he drew with Hungarian grand master Laszlo Szabo.
Play ended after 33 moves. Fischer early had an opportunity to draw but elected to try for the full point and continued play. The result left him with 8 points and one adjourned match.
Russia's Mikhail Talj took undisputed possession of first place Sunday when he drew with Argentina's Raul Sanguinetti and Soviet grand master Tigran Petrosyan was upset in a 16th round match by Bent Larsen of Denmark. Talj has 11 points and Petrosyan 10.5

Yankee Gains Half-Point in Chess Tourney

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 01, 1958

Fischer Draws with Laszlo Szabo in 33 moves
Mikhail Tal, the Soviet chess champion, returned to first place in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz last night, according to a report from Yugoslavia. He drew in twenty moves with Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina and now has a score of 11-5.
Bobby Fischer, 15, the United States champion, from Brooklyn, drew with Laszlo Szabo of Hungary in thirty-three moves. Fisher played the Ruy Lopez and sacrificed his queen for a rook and bishop.

Fischer Draws with Laszlo Szabo in 33 moves

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 31

Fischer Triumphs In 90-Move Game
Beats Sherwin in Rook and Pawn Ending at Portoroz to Tie for 5th Place

Bobby Fischer won his adjourned fourteenth-round game of the interzonal chess tournament from James T. Sherwin of New York in ninety moves, according to a report received here last night from Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
The point gave the 15-year-old United States champion a score of 9—6 and left him on even terms with four others for fifth place.
It was Fischer's third session with Sherwin and they fought out a rook-and-pawn ending. Sherwin missed what was regarded as a theoretical draw.
Mikhail Tal and Tigran Petrosian, two of Russia's grandmasters, continue first and second, respectively, with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, half a point behind them. Olafsson drew his fifteenth-round game with Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina without resuming play.
Sherwin drew in his adjourned sixteenth-round game with Yuri Auerbach of Russia in sixty-seven moves. Sherwin's score is 6-9.

Fischer Triumphs In 90-Move Game

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The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 18

Fischer Gains on Chess Leaders
Portoroz, Yugoslavia—(AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States chess champion from New York, Monday joined the group of favorites at the Interzonal Chess Tournament played in the framework of world chess championship.
Fischer defeated international master James Sherwin of New York in the twice adjourned match from the 14th round. After three hours play and after 90 moves Fischer came through with the victory.
With nine points out of 16 matches Fischer joined the “Grand Master's Group” and is at present sharing the fifth place with such prominent grand masters as David Bronstein of Russia and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.

Fischer Gains on Chess Leaders

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The Evening Review, East Liverpool, Ohio, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 4

Atonement
Paradoxically, it is the atheistic, royalty-hating Russian Communists who dominate the one activity dealing with symbolic kings, queens and bishops.
This activity is chess.
There may be some question about whether the United States or Russia is ahead in the space race and the cold war, but in world chess competition the Russians have been tops for years. One reason is that the Russian government makes wards of its best chess players, freeing them from the necessity of earning a living.
But this year the United States came up with a chess sensation of its own—15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y., who won the U.S. championship.
Young Bobby and James Sherwin, U.S. international master, have been busy with international tournaments, matching their chess knowledge against the Russians and others.
Their fellow Americans wish Bobby and Sherwin well in this cold war of wits. Who knows, in years to come, Bobby might yet wrest the world championship for our country and atone for Sputnik.

Atonement

Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 37

Who Won?
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States chess champion from New York, after three hours and 90 moves, over International Master James Sherwin of New York, to join the group of favorites at the Interzonal Chess Tournament.

Bobby Fischer vs. James Sherwin of New York

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 04, 1958 - Page 38

“Bobby Fischer continues to make headlines at Portoroz, although the Soviet grandmasters still are dominating the standings in the interzonal tournament. … Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who defeated Fischer in the 11th round, was third at 10-6. … Then in a tie for sixth place at 9-6 came five other players, including Fischer. … In the 13th round Fischer drew with Petrosian in a difficult rook and pawn ending. Then in the 14th round, in his longest game of the tournament, the 15-year-old Brooklyn phenomenon defeated fellow American James T. Sherwin of New York in another rook and pawn ending. This game went three sessions before a decision was arrived at. Observers said Sherwin had at least a theoretical draw, but missed it. Two specimens of Bobby Fischer's play in the interzonal are given below.

Bobby Fischer continues to make headlines at Portoroz

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 4, 1958 - Page 26

Tal, Panno Adjourn In Interzone Chess
“The United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, drew in twenty-four moves with Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia. At 9½—6½, he was in a triple tie with David Bronstein of Russia and Pachman.”

Tal, Panno Adjourn In Interzone Chess: Bobby Fischer Draws in 25 Moves with Ludek Pachman

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 05, 1958 - Page 30

Petrosian Draws, Takes Chess Lead
“Bobby Fischer, United States champion, in a Ruy Lopez, lasting thirty-six moves.”

Petrosian Draws, Takes Chess Lead: Bobby Fischer, 36 Moves

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, September 05, 1958 - Page 48

“Bobby Fischer, 15, of New York drew with Aleksander Matanovic of Yugoslavia and gained half a point in world chess title play in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.

Bobby Fischer Draws with Aleksander Matanovic of Yugoslavia

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 06, 1958 - Page 13

Tal Wins a Match Then Plays Draw To Lead in Chess
“Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, on equal terms with Laszlo Szabo of Hungary, was tied at 10—7 by Alexander Matanovic, Yugoslavia, who lost his seventeenth-round game to Pal Benko, Hungary.

Tal Wins a Match Then Plays Draw To Lead in Chess

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 277

Fischer Retains Hopes of Gaining
U.S. Youth and 3 Russians in Strong Bids to Reach Challengers' Chess

As the end of the interzone chess at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, approaches the Russians are making a strong bid to land three of the six places in next year's challengers' tournament.
Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old United States champion, also is in a good position to qualify. None of the four Russian contenders has been able to win from him. He drew with each—David Bronstein, Yuri Auerbach, Mikhail Tal and Tigran Petrosian.
The most noteworthy of Fischer's performances was his game with Petrosian, who has been rivaling Tal, Soviet national champion, for first place.
Fischer, on the black side of a King's Indian defense, fought the grandmaster to a standstill in sixty-seven moves. Petrosian appeared to have the better of it, with two connected passed pawns. The Russian was first to queen a pawn, but the American resorted to a technical draw, possible because his pawn, having reached the seventh rank, was on the queen's bishop file. The game is included in the following selection received here from Portoroz:

Fischer Retains Hopes of Gaining

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 277

Fischer, Filip Draw In International Chess
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, gained another half point last night in the nineteenth round of the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The 15-year-old Brooklyn player resorted to the King's Indian defense against Dr. Miroslav Filip of Czechoslovakia. After several exchanges the two agreed to a draw following seventeen moves.
This left Fischer in a triple tie for seventh place, at 10½—7½ with Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia and Laszlo Szabo of Hungary.
Mikhail Tal, the Soviet national champion, had a bye but kept the lead with 12½—5½ as against 11½—6½ for Tigran Petrosian of Russia, who adjourned with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. Olafsson sacrificed a pawn for the attack. It is believed the game will end in a draw. In that case Petrosian still would be second.
James T. Sherwin of New York, pitted against Oscar Panno of Buenos Aires, built up a fine position against the latter's King Indian defense, but spoiled his chances under time pressure, losing in forty-four moves.

Fischer, Filip Draw In International Chess

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San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 78 () ()

“Bobby Fischer, age 15, the youngest player to win the U.S. championship is half way through the Interzonal tournament being held at Portoroz, Yugoslavia. His score at this writing is 5½-3½ and includes draws with Bronstein, Aurbach, Neikirch, and Panno and wins against Fuster, Sanguinnetti, and Larsen.
He is in a tie for fourth place. If his results prove poorly in the final half of the tournament, which is difficult to believe possible, he will still have proven that he is a player of caliber and no 90 day wonder.
One of the leaders of this tournament is M. Tal of Russia, who has won the U.S.S.R. championship twice running. As of this writing, Bobby Fischer has yet to play Tal. Both are fierce attacking players.

Championship Chess: Halfway through Tournament, Prospect on Fischer vs. Tal

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 59

“Bobby Fischer's score is now 7½-5½.

1958 Interzonal in Yugoslavia: Bobby Fischer's Score 7.5

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 65

Tal Leads Interzonal Chess; Fischer Gains
Mikhail Tal, Russian chess champion, moved into first place with a score of 11-5 after completing the 16th round of the Interzonal Chess Tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, according to a report from the New York Times.
After an early loss to Alexander Matanovic of Yugoslavia, Tal has played steady and consistently sound chess, winning seven and drawing eight games. He still faces a difficult schedule, with four games remaining against Oscar Panno of Argentina, Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, Tigran Petrosian of Russia and James T. Sherwin of the U.S.A.
Petrosian, who had been leading most of the way, lost for the first time to Bent Larson of Denmark, who scored with a Bird's Opening in 41 moves. Petrosian is in second place with 10½-5½, which includes six wins and nine draws.
In third place is Olafsson, with a 10-6 tally. More erratic than the Russians, he has been on the losing end three times, but has seven wins and six draws. Slightly behind him is Matanovic, with 9½-5½
U.S Champion Bobby Fischer advanced during last week's play to a tie for fifth at 9-6. Sharing that score are Yuri Auerbach and David Bronstein of Russia, Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia and Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia.
In the 13th round Fischer was paired with Petrosian, and adopted the King's Indian Defense. A difficult rook and pawn ending resulted, which was drawn after 67 moves in two sessions.
Fischer then went 90 moves and three sessions against fellow American Sherwin. The latter finally missed his way and lost in a theoretically drawn rook and pawn end-game.
Fischer made it two in a row by defeating Boris deGreif of Colombia. The South American sacrificed a piece to gain the initiative, but Bobby put up a stout defense. Overstepping the time limit, deGrief lost in 35 moves. In his final game of the week, Fischer drew with Lazlo Szabo of Hungary in 33 moves.
Sherwin did not fare so well, losing two and drawing two of his games for the week. Pitted against Bronstein, he adopted the English Opening and stood up stoutly until he lost his grip under the pressure of the time limit. Sherwin lost a piece and exceeded the time limit after 39 moves.
In two long endgames, each of which went into a second session, Sherwin drew with Paul Benko, former Hungarian champion who is now residing in the U.S., in 68 moves.
Following is the standing of the players after 16 rounds, and games from the tournament.

Tal Leads Interzonal Chess; Fischer Gains

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 08, 1958 - Page 35

Gligoric Advances In Portoroz Chess
“Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, adjourned after forty-one moves with Rodolfo Cardoso of the Philippines, who set up a Caro-Kann defense. Fischer had the better prospects in an ending with minor pieces. Fischer, with a 10½—7½ record, is given a fair chance to qualify.

Gligoric Advances In Portoroz Chess: Bobby Fischer Adjourns After 41 Moves with Cardoso

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 09, 1958 - Page 44

Fischer Bolsters Tourney Position
Beats Cardoso in Portoroz Chess to Stay in Running for Challengers' Event

“Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, won his adjourned twentieth-round game from Rodolfo Cardoso of the Philippines in sixty-two moves in a bishop versus knight ending.
The 15-year-old Brooklynite has an excellent chance for one of the three remaining places. At 11½ points he is tied with David Bronstein of Russia, who is still undefeated.”

Fischer Bolsters Tourney Position

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 46

Fischer Finishes With 12-8 Record
Brooklyn Boy 5th in Chess Tourney Which Winds Up Tonight in Yugoslavia

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old United States chess champion, drew with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in the twenty-first round of the interzone tournament at Portoroz last night, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
Thus, Fischer completed competition with a score of 12—8 and stood in fifth place. Observers felt he would finish in the first six, enabling him to play in the challengers' tournament next year.
His final position will be determined tonight when four adjourned games are completed.
Four players ahead of him in the standing have qualified. They are Mikhail Tal of Russia, Gligoric, Pal Benko of Hungary and Tigran Petrosian of Russia.
David Bronstein of Russia was surprisingly in trouble in his unfinished game with Rodolfo Cardoso of the Philippines, whose adjourned position is regarded as strong.
Laszlo Szabo of Hungary, who also has a chance to overtake Fischer, was in an inferior position in his game with Oscar Panno of Argentina. Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland should equal Fischer's score by winning from Boris deGrief of Colombia.

Fischer Finishes With 12-8 Record: Brooklyn Boy 5th in Chess Tourney Which Winds Up Tonight in Yugoslavia

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 46

Yugoslavs Lionize Fischer, U.S. Chess Prodigy: Brooklyn Youth, 15, Is Called Genius by Official
By Paul Underwood
Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Sept. 10—A burst of applause broke the hush in the small hall as the gangling boy pushed back his chair and dashed for the door in a tangle of arms and legs not quite under control.
Excited spectators, ignoring chess-match protocol, vaulted the railing to head him off and get his autograph.
Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn chess prodigy, fighting from what seemed a hopeless position, had just gained a brilliant draw with Tigran Petrosian, a Soviet grandmaster and one of the favorites in the interzone tournament at this Adriatic resort.
Chess experts gave “Little Bobby,” as the Yugoslavs call him, only an outside chance in the tournament because of his inexperience in international competition. But no one takes him lightly.
“He is a real, authentic genius who some day will be a truly great player,” said one tournament official. “He plays the game with fire and great imagination.”
Bobby won the United States championship last January. In June he flew to Moscow to see the game played in a land where it has almost the status of a national sport. He moved on to Yugoslavia to prepare for the tournament here.
He had little to say about his Moscow visit although he obviously was not happy about it. Friends said he had been disappointed at not getting to play one of the top-ranking Russian masters, such as Mikhail Botvinnik, the world champion, or Vassily Smyslov, a former champion.
Soviet chess officials offered him matches with other players but Bobby refused. He contented himself with playing “rapid” chess, in which the moves must be made within seconds, against all comers in Moscow's Central Chess Club.
He was delighted with Yugoslavia, however. When he arrived in Belgrade, Yugoslav fans adopted him almost as one of their own. He received a suite in a hotel and practice games were arranged with two of the nation's leading players.
“Belgrade is a wonderful city,” he said.
Asked whether he had noticed any differences between playing chess in Europe and in the United States, he replied:
“Not many. Everyone makes just as much noise.”
There are twenty-one players in the tournament here, including another American, James Sherwin, also of the Manhattan Chess Club. Winners of the first six places will qualify for the challengers' tourney next year. The victor in that event will play Botvinnik in a match of twenty-four games for the world title in 1960.
At the chess table, Bobby appears composed beyond his years. In a difficult game he sits for hours hunched over the board like an underfed Buddha. Despite his imaginative brilliance, he is a thoughtful, deliberate player. In one match here he pondered for an hour and a half before making a move that saved him from defeat.
When the going is easier he will often leave his board while his opponent is thinking out his next move and wander around the other tables, studying the progress of games there and betraying his inner tension by cracking his knuckles and biting his fingernails.
Outside the hall he is again a shy adolescent at the most awkward age. As laconic as the hero of an old cowboy movie, it is almost impossible to get him started talking about anything except chess. But he did admit to being a “pretty good” student at Erasmus Hall High in Brooklyn, where he will be a junior this year. And he likes Spanish and tennis “a little bit.”
With chess players, and on the subject of chess, he is more outgoing and more confident. Discussing one of his victories in this tournament, he said the result had been certain after his opponent had sacrificed a piece. And he added calmly, but with a touch of adolescent braggadocio:
“No one gives Fischer a piece.”

Yugoslavs Lionize Fischer, U.S. Chess Prodigy: Brooklyn Youth, 15, Is Called Genius by Official

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 7

Fischer's Qualification Hinges on Final Round

Whether Bobby Fischer qualifies for the challengers' chess tournament next year hinges on the 20th and final round results in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, which should be completed today.
With one game to finish, the 15-year-old United States champion was tied with David Bronstein, of Russia, for fifth place in the standings. Each of them had a score of 11½-7½. It seemed likely that Bobby will be one of the six qualifiers, but not certain, since four other players were close behind at 11-8 each.
[…]
In this game, however, Fischer appeared to have a clear-cut advantage when Larsen resigned.

Fischer's Qualification Hinges on Final Round

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The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 27

Russian Is Top Man in Chess Meet
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Sept. 10 (AP)—Mikhail Tal of Russia tonight emerged as the number one player in the international chess tournament.
The Soviet champion drew with international master James Sherwin in a last round game tonight to finish the tournament with 13.5 points.
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American chess champion from New York, drew with Yugoslav grand master Svetozar Gligoric. That result left Gligoric in a firm second place in the final standings with 13 points, while Fischer held fifth place—at least temporarily—with a final score of 12 points.
Fischer's final position will be determined by the outcome of matches not finished tonight, and adjourned until tomorrow.
But he seemed almost assured of participation in next year's “tournament of candidates.”
The players who finish in the first six places will enter the “tournament of candidates” at a still to be specified site next year.
The winner of the “tournament of candidates” gets to challenge world champion Michael Botvinnik, of Russia, in 1960.

Russian Is Top Man in Chess Meet

Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 15

Mikhail Talj, Russia, emerged as the No. 1 player in the Interzonal Chess Tournament at Petroz, Yugoslavia. American 15-year-old Bobby Fischer is almost a sure bet to remain in the running for next year's Tournament of Candidates.”

Bobby Fischer Sure Bet To Remain In Running For Next Year's Tournament of Candidates

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 29

Fischer, 15, Gets Top Chess Status
Brooklyn Player Is Youngest to Become International Grand Master

Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Sept. 11 (AP) — Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old United States champion, became an international chess grand master today. He is the youngest player to hold that title.
Fischer tied for fifth in the interzone tournament here, played in a framework of world championship competition. He thus received the title of international grand master.
This marked a brilliant success for Fischer, who was competing in his first, international tournament.
He qualified with the five other leaders for next year's tournament of candidates. The winner of that event will meet the world champion, Mikhail Botvinnik of the Soviet Union, in 1960 for the title.
The young American played very successfully here. He drew against all the Soviet grand masters represented. From 20 possible points he collected 12.
A Hungarian refugee, Paul Benko, a member of the United States Chess Federation, shared third place with a Soviet grand master, Tigran Petrosian. Benko, too, became an international grand master.
First place here was taken by Mikhail Tal of the U.S.S.R. Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia was the runner-up.
Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland tied Fischer for fifth.
About 40 In Select Group
As an international grand master Fischer belongs to the most exclusive chess fraternity in the world.
A spokesman for the Manhattan Chess Club estimated Thursday that there were only about forty international grand masters now playing.
If chess players distinguish themselves in American tournament play, they become masters: if, among masters, a player continues to win, then in America, he becomes a grand master. Before Fischer left for his international competition, he was regarded as a grand master.
To go any higher in the echelons of chess reputation a grand master must excel among the grand masters of the world. When Fischer did this, he was named by the game's international body—the International Chess Federation in Stockholm (referred to as Federation Internationale des Echecs)—as an international grand master.
4 Adjourned Games Played
The interzone tournament ended Thursday when four adjourned games were finished, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
David Bronstein of the Soviet Union was upset by Rodolfo Cardoso of the Philippines.
Fischer won six games in all, drew twelve and lost two, to Benko and Olafsson, respectively. In the Brooklyn student's last game, he drew with Gligoric on the black side of a Sicilian defense in thirty-two moves.

Fischer, 15, Gets Top Chess Status: Brooklyn Player Is Youngest to Become International Grand Master

This article also appears in,

The Berkshire Eagle, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 12

Bobby Fischer, 15, Chess Grand Master
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn wonder kid, has the distinction today of being the youngest Grand Master in the long history of chess.
Bobby achieved the title Thursday night when he wound up fifth in the six-week international chess tournament set up to determine six potential challengers for the world title.

Bobby Fischer, 15, Chess Grand Master

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The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 4

Brilliant Success
U.S. Chess Whiz, 15, Is Made Grand Master

PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia, Sept. 11 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old United States chess champion, became a chess grand master today, the youngest ever to hold this title in chess history.
Fischer placed fifth at the interzonal chess tournament here played in framework of world championship competition and thus automatically received the title of grand master.
This marked a brilliant success for Fischer, who came to Europe to compete for the first time in his life at an international chess championship tournament.
He qualified also for the next year's tournament of candidates, the winner of which plays for the world championship with present world champion Soviet grand master Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960.
The young American grand master of the interzonal chess tournament played very successfully. He drew against all Soviet grand masters represented here. From 20 possible points he collected 12 which in the tough competition of best world chess players is considered an extremely good result.
Hungarian refugee Paul Benko, a member of the U.S. Chess Federation, shares third with Soviet Grand Master Tigran Petrosyan. Benko, too, became a grand master.
Benko left Hungary after 1956 in his homeland. Hungarian refugees contributed to enable him to come to Portoroz. He, too, will enter the tournament of candidates.
Both Fischer and Benko will be the strongest entries for the candidates tournament from the West. Their likely opponents will be Paul Keres and Vasili Smislov, who placed first and second at the last candidates tournament and the first to sixth placed at Portoroz, among them Soviet grand masters Mikhal Talj and Tigran Petrosyan, and Yugoslav grand master Svetozar Gligoric. The eighth entry has not yet been decided and depends on the outcome of the tournament here, which will end tonight.

U.S. Chess Whiz, 15, Is Made Grand Master

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 2

Portoroz Chess Tournament Ends: Benko, Fischer, and Olafsson Qualify
From a Chess Correspondent
Portoroz, September 11.
The third interzonal chess tournament ended here to-night. The six players who are to compete at the next candidates' tournament, the winner of which will challenge the world champion Botvinnik, are Tal, Gligoric, Petrosian, Benko, Fischer and Olafsson.
Until the last move there was a possibility that six people could share the sixth place if Olafsson drew against de Greiff in his last game before the curtain fell. However, the Icelander concluded six weeks of hard fight by beautifully mating the Columbian master in the fifty-third move.
In the most dramatic last round, played the night before in such a furious thunderstorm that the lights went off for a while and all telephone lines were cut, the outsider Cardoso, only third from the bottom, produced the biggest sensation of the whole tournament, be beating grandmaster Bronstein who went through twenty previous rounds as the only unbeaten competitor.
Bronstein was thus deprived of the opportunity to appear in the third candidates' tournament but the American champion, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, took his chance to make chess history. He both qualified for the candidates' tournament and became the youngest grandmaster ever.

Fierce struggle
Fischer drew with Gligoric after a fierce struggle in which the Yugoslav champion tried very hard to win and to catch the leader Tal at the last bend. Tal drew with Sherwin and was congratulated by all other participants as a truly deserving winner. The other prospective candidates for the winning sector, Szabo and Pachman, could only draw with Panno and Sanguinetti respectively and were caught by Matanovic, who beat Larsen.
To win this tournament which will undoubtedly rate as one of the sharpest and most dynamic in chess history Tal won eight games, drew eleven, and lost one, Gligoric had the same number of wins but lost one more game. Of the other winners, Petrosian won six, drew thirteen, and lost one: Benko won seven, drew twelve, and lost two: Fischer won six, drew twelve, and lost two: and Olafsson won eight, drew eight, and lost four.
The final position was:

Tal (USSR) 13½, Gligoric (Yugoslavia) 13, Benko (stateless) and Petrosian (USSR) 12½, Fischer (USA) and Olafsson (Iceland) 12, Averbakh (USSR) and Bronstein (USSR) 11½, Matanovic (Yugoslavia), Pachman (Czechoslovakia), Szabo (Hungary), Filip (Czechoslovakia), and Panno (Argentina) 11, Sanguinetti (Argentina) 10, Neikirch (Bulgaria) 9½, Larsen (Denmark) 8½, Sherwin (USA) 7½ Rossetto (Argentina) 7, Cardoso (Philippines) 6, de Greiff (Columbia) 4½, Fuster (Canada) 2.

Nordic game
Not all the best games in the tournament were played by the Russians, who rather tended to dominate it. In the following Nordic game the Danish player Larsen was White and Olafsson, the Icelander, Black.

Portoroz Chess Tournament Ends: Benko, Fischer, and Olafsson Qualify

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 28

“Bobby Fischer may have difficulty in qualifying for next year's world's candidates tournament, since he must win both his remaining games to finish in the top six who will qualify for the event.”

Bobby Fischer must win two remaining games to qualify for candidates tournament

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 14, 1958

Boy Chess Expert Delayed Abroad
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn Returning—Faces ‘Grind’ to Make Up School Work

By Wayne Phillips
Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn boy who moves into the top rank of world chess players last week, has headed home for what may be even more difficult brain work.
Bobby, who excels in the things he likes and has difficulty with those he doesn't, missed the first week of his junior year at Erasmus Hall High School because he was playing in an international tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
He tied for fifth place in the tournament, thereby qualifying for next year's Challenger's Tournament. This will decide who will meet the Soviet Union's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960 for the world title. Bobby's performance made him the youngest person ever to qualify as an international grand master.
Bobby's mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer of 560 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, had expected him home in time to start school tomorrow. But yesterday she learned that he had been unable to get space on a flight, and would be delayed several more days.
Miss Grace Corey, administrative assistant to the principal at Bobby's school, said he would not be subject to any disciplinary action for his late arrival at school—“but it will be very difficult to make up the work he lost.”
For a while yesterday Mrs. Fischer thought her son might have been stranded in Portoroz without money or friends. She believed the other Americans there had already left, and the last she knew Bobby had only $10 or $15.
Bobby won his round-trip plane ticket to the tournament by appearing on a television show, and stayed in Portoroz as a guest of the tournament committee. He took little money with him.
Mrs. Fischer received a cable from him yesterday saying he would be unable to get a flight home until Oct. 4. In Portoroz, however, a chess official told the Belgrade correspondent of The New York Times that Bobby had left for the Yugoslav capital.
This official said Bobby had been assured of getting train passage to Brussels, Belgium, where he would be able to pick up a flight on any of a number of air lines that fly to New York.
Brussels, though, may take him two days. And Mrs. Fischer still does not know where he got the money for the train fare.

Boy Chess Expert Delayed Abroad

The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 88

Whiz Kid at Chessboard
But Bobby, 15, Finds Books Baffling

New York Times Service
New York, Sept. 13—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn boy who this week moved into the top rank of world chess players, has headed home for what may be even more difficult brain work.
Bobby, who excels in the things he likes and has difficulty with those he doesn't, missed the first week of his junior year at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn because he was playing in an international tournament in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
HE TIED FOR fifth place, qualifying for a part in next year's challenger's tournament to decide who will meet Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia in 1960 for the world title. His performance made him the youngest person ever to qualify as an international grand master.
Bobby's mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, had expected him home in time to start school Monday. But Saturday learned he had been unable to get a seat on a plane and would be delayed several more days.
HIS PRINCIPAL, Miss Grace Corey said he wouldn't be subject to any disciplinary action for his late arrival at school — “But it will be very difficult to make up the work he lost.”
In the past, Bobby has had difficulties with school work, even while moving up in the ranks of chess players to capture first the United States Open chess tournament and then the U.S. chess championship.

But last year, despite an intensive schedule, he settled down and scored 97 in mathematics, 90 in Spanish and 80 in biology examinations.

This year, though his principal said he would be carrying five courses — English, Spanish, intermediate algebra, world history and physical chemistry.

Whiz Kid at Chessboard

Daily News New York, New York Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 10

Dough Checks Chess Whiz, 15
Bobby Fischer, who at 15 is the youngest person to achieve the title of an international chess grand master by placing among the first six in the recent tournament in Portoroz, Yugoslavia, may get stranded there without money, according to word received yesterday by his mother.
Mrs. Regina Fischer, of 560 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, said she had received a cable from him saying that he was unable to get a plane for home until October 4. He had only $10 or $15, she said, adding that funds to replace his stolen travelers checks had not reached him when last she spoke to him on the phone.
Bobby, who has won the U.S. chess championship and the U.S. open chess tournament, tied for fifth place in the international tournament Thursday. He was to have started his junior year at Erasmus High School Sept. 8 but now will miss the first three weeks.

Dough Checks Chess Whiz, 15

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 237

Fischer Will Face Russians In Chess: Brooklyn Boy to Play Keres and Smyslov Next Year in Challengers' Tourney
By finishing in a fifth-place tie in the recent interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn earned the promotion to next year's challengers' tournament, to be held in Europe at a place yet to be determined.
On the strength of this showing, the 15-year-old United States champion is fully entitled to the rank of international grandmaster bestowed upon him by the authorities at Stockholm, headquarters of the International Chess Federation.
Fischer now will get the chance to meet Vassily Smyslov and Paul Keres, the two Russians he could not play on a recent visit to Moscow. Smyslov and Keres were seeded into the challengers' event.
Another selection of game scores from Portoroz includes two additional specimens of Fischer's play and examples by leaders. These include Mikhail Tal, the winner; Tigran Petrosian, Fridrik Olafsson and James T. Sherwin of New York.
The scores:

Fischer Will Face Russians In Chess: Brooklyn Boy to Play Keres and Smyslov Next Year in Challengers' Tourney

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 74

“Bobby Fischer, United States champion, is in a triple tie for seventh place, with Matanovic and Szabo, score 10½-7½.”

Bobby Fischer, United States champion, is in a triple tie

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 15, 1958 - Page 29

Boy Chess Ace Due At Idlewild Today
Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn's 15-year-old international chess champion, is due in New York by air this morning. He left Brussels, Belgium, last night on a flight scheduled to arrive at New York International Airport, Idlewild, Queens, at 7:30 A.M.
Bobby tied for fifth place last week in a world chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, and became the youngest person ever to qualify as an international grand master.
His mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer of 560 Lincoln Place, Brooklyn, had feared he was stranded in Yugoslavia without funds when she was advised he could not get a flight home until Oct. 4.
An official of the Yugoslav Chess Federation said in Belgrade yesterday, however, that Bobby had received over $400 in prize money on Friday. He took a train to Munich, Germany, and then flew to Brussels to make the New York flight.

Boy Chess Ace Due At Idlewild Today

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Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, September 15, 1958 - Page 55

Young Chess Grand Master Goes To Zurich
Belgrade, Yugoslavia, Sept. 14 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, world's youngest chess grand master, left Yugoslavia Sunday night to join his sister in Zurich, Switzerland.
Fischer became chess grand master at the age of 15, a record unbeaten in chess history. He placed among the first six in the International chess tournament which ended last Thursday.
The young American next will participate at the Tournament of Candidates in 1959—the last stage in the world chess championship competition.

Young Chess Grand Master Goes To Zurich

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 29

Bobby Fischer, Chess Hero, Back To Realities of Brooklyn Home
International Master Finds He's Just an Unusual Boy of 15 in His Own City

By Emma Harrison
Bobby Fischer came home to Brooklyn yesterday, a hero abroad.
Here, he is a hero only among chess players. They know that to have gone at 15 years old to the Candidates Chess Tournament in Portoroz, Yugoslavia, as United States Champion and returned as an international grand master is remarkable.
Bobby flew in from Brussels yesterday morning to the delight and surprise of his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer. She had began to doubt he had money to come from anywhere. Prize money as the fifth-place tournament winner made the difference, Bobby reported. He won his original fare on a television program.
With his mother, sister Joan, and a friend, Bobby arrived at his home at 560 Lincoln Place at 12:13 P.M. By 12:33 he was playing chess.
It took that long because he had to read his mail, stumble up three flights of stairs and unwrap a new chess set.
But he soon had Norman Monath, his opponent, beaten. Mr. Monath, a philosophical chap who is an editor at Simon & Shuster and is shepherding Bobby through a book, “Bobby Fischer's Chess,” has found that playing chess is the best way to communicate with Bobby. But this way is not uncomplicated.
While he answered phone calls, hauled out a souvenir scarf and greeted the cat he kept up his play and grudgingly talked.
“Abroad there is much more interest in chess,” he said. “Chess is considered an art; everybody knows about it.” (His showing qualifies him to play in the Challengers Tournament next year to see who will challenged the champion, Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia).
“I had to sign hundreds of autographs. Terrible.” he added.
And then, glancing at Mr. Monath's side of the chess board:
“I think you have an inferior position.”
And to his mother, trying on her new silk scarf:
“That's very Continental.”
“Say, do you know what my name is in Yugoslavia—‘Bow-bee Feesah.’”
Bobby said he learned a “few tricks” and would have to get started on his practice right away. The international players had told him they would beat him, he said. He named a few games he thought he should have lost. Pressed for detail, however, he recanted.
“I lost two games. I should have won all my games,” he said in international grand masterly tones.

Bobby Fischer, Chess Hero, Back To Realities of Brooklyn Home

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The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 19

American Chess Ace, 15, Returns To Books
New York, Sept. 15 (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, the only American to qualify for next year's World Challengers' Chess tournament, arrived by plane today for a bout with his high school books.
Fischer tied for fifth place in the Inter-Zonal World Chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, to qualify for the Challengers' tourney in 1959. If he wins that one, he will be entitled to play Soviet World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik for the world title in 1960.
The youth, a junior at Erasmus High School in Brooklyn, was met at Idlewild Airport by his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer.
Fischer, the youngest person to ever qualify for the Challenger's tournament, was asked if he thought he could beat Botvinnik. He shrugged noncommittally.

American Chess Ace, 15, Returns To Books

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 10

The New York Times says:
Chess fans all over the United States are toasting Bobby Fischer and we are happy to join in the acclaim. At 15, this youngster from Brooklyn has become the youngest international grand master in chess and has qualified for next year's tournament to decide who shall meet Mikhail Botvinnik for the world's chess championship. Those who have followed Bobby's stirring matches in the competition just concluded in Yugoslavia know that he gave an exhibition of skill, courage and determination that would have done credit to a master twice his age. We are rightfully proud of him.

Cheers for Bobby Fischer

Daily News New York, New York Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 163

Chess Whiz, 15, Returns Triumphant but Skinny
America's teen-aged chess genius, Bobby Fischer, of Brooklyn, came home yesterday from three months of tourney play in Europe during which he became the youngest person ever to qualify as an international chess master.
The 15-year-old Erasmus High student wasn't inclined to talk about his achievements when his plane landed at 10 A.M. at International Airport. His mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, of 560 Lincoln Place, was there to meet him.
She thought Bobby looked “skinny as a rail.” The youth told reporters he felt physically okay. He said he picked up about $150 in prize money at the interzonal world chess tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, in which he tied for fifth place.
That also qualified him for the challengers' tournament in 1959, the winner to take on Russia's world champ, Mikhail Botvinnik.

Chess Whiz, 15, Returns Triumphant but Skinny

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The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 12

Back To School—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old whiz kid of the world chess masters, leaves the plane at Idlewild airport after a flight from Brussels. Bobby, heading back to high school in his native Brooklyn, wound up in the top six in the international competition in Yugoslavia, the youngest international grand master ever. —(AP Wirephoto)

Back To School

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The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 1

Has Eye on World Title—Yankee Chess Whiz-Kid Begins His Training a Year in Advance
Brooklyn (AP)—If a boxer began training for a championship fight a year in advance of the battle, you'd wonder if he was kidding.
But chess players … ah, that's different.

BOBBY FISCHER, the 15-year-old whiz-kid of world chess—he's youngest international grand master ever—went back to Erasmus Hall High School in Flatbush Tuesday, but he was mentally figuring out his strategy for next year's challenger's tournament.
In that one, he could wind up challenging Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia, the current ruler, for the world championship.
When he showed up in Europe for the candidates' tournament—sort of an elimination for the challengers' event—he wasn't taken very seriously. Still he wound up in the top six in the competition in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.

I LEARNED a few tricks,” he said, “and I can't wait a minute to get started with my practice.”
He arrived home Monday and within 10 minutes he had sat down at a chess table. In a few more minutes he had his opponent, Norman Monath, beaten. Monath is an editor who is helping Bobby write a book on chess.
“You know,” said Bobby, “when I arrived in Yugoslavia, all the international players told me they would beat me. Actually, I lost two games. I should have won them all.

BOBBY SAID that there is much more interest in chess outside the United States than there is here.
“Why,” he said, “I had to sign hundreds of autographs. Abroad everyone knows about chess. It is considered an art.”
Bobby's mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, was worried that the lad would not have the money to come home. But his fifth-place in the tournament provided him with about $340 and that made it easy.

WELL, IT'LL BE hard, but a few hours a day while he's cracking the books in English, history and the like, he'll forget about chess.
But if he could only get that Botvinnik …

Has Eye on World Title—Yankee Chess Whiz-Kid Begins His Training a Year in Advance

Edmonton Journal Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Wednesday, September 17, 1958 - Page 43

Chess Whiz, 15, Starts Training
Brooklyn (AP)—If a boxer began training for a championship fight a year in advance of the battle, you'd wonder if he was kidding.
With chess players, it's different.
Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old whiz kid of world chess—he's the youngest international grand master ever—went back to Erasmus Hall high school in Flatbush Tuesday, but he was mentally figuring out his strategy for next year's challenger's tournament.
In that one, he could wind up challenging Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia, current ruler, for the world championship.
When he showed up in Europe for the candidates' tournament—sort of an elimination for the challengers' event—he wasn't taken very seriously. Still, he wound up in the top six in the competition in Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
“I learned a few tricks,” he said, “and I can't wait a minute to get started with my practice.”
He arrived home Monday and within 10 minutes he had sat down at a chess board.
“You know,” said Bobby, “when I arrived in Yugoslavia, all the international players told me they would beat me. Actually, I lost two games. I should have won them all.”
Bobby pointed out that there is a lot more interest in chess outside the United States than there is here.
“Why,” he said, “I had to sign hundreds of autographs. Abroad everyone knows about chess. It is considered an art.”

Chess Whiz, 15, Starts Training

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 32

Chess With Sam Laird
Fine Playing of Youth Big Story of Week

Bobby Fischer's fine showing at Portoroz, in qualifying for the challengers' tournament next year and becoming the youngest international grand master in history, of course was the big story of the chess world during the past week.
The 15-year-old United States champion tied for fifth place among the 21 players in the interzonal with Fridrick Olafsson, of Iceland, one of the two who won a game from him. Soviet champion Mikhail Tal finished first, followed by Svetozar Gligoric, of Yugoslavia, Hungarian refugee Pal Benko (now a resident of Cleveland and a U.S Chess Federation member) and Tigran Petrosian, of Russia, in that order to make up, with Fischer and Olafsson, the six qualifiers for next year.
Fischer finished with 12 out of a possible 20 points by scoring six victories, drawing 12 games, and losing twice. Benko was the only player besides Olafsson to defeat him. He drew with all four of the Russians, an earlier report that he beat Tal proving erroneous.
During his visit to Russia and the Portoroz tournament Bobby did not get to play either ex-world champion Vassily Smyslov or Paul Keres, who are perhaps the Soviet's strongest players except for world champion Mikhail Botvinnik. Keres and Smyslov, who finished one-two in the last challenger's event, will be seeded into competition in next year's tourney and Bobby will get his chance to play them then. The winner of the tournament will met Botvinnik in 1960 for the world's title.
It is unnecessary to elaborate on Fischer's remarkable showing at Portoroz. He fully lived up to all his previous promise in his first trip abroad and his first tournament where the competition was so stiff. He has “convinced” European observers who at first tended to underrate him, saying “After all, he's only 15.” If his game continues to improve in the next two years as it has in the last two, Botvinnik's crown rests uneasily indeed upon his head today.
Bobby now has returned home and resumed his studies as a junior at Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn. Last week there were reports that he was stranded in Yugoslavia for lack of funds to return home, but the $340 prize money he won was more than ample for plane fare back. He is writing a book on chess that is due to be published next year.
He says the thing he liked best at Portoroz was getting an even score with the four Russian grand masters — Tal, Petrosian, Bronstein and Auerbach. The thing he liked least was having to sign hundreds of autographs. He also says he should have won the two games he lost.
One of his games and another from the tournament are appended.

Chess With Sam Laird

Public Opinion Chambersburg, Pennsylvania Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 24

Bobby Fischer, Grand Master
This seems like a pretty good time to salute Bobby Fischer, a fifteen-year-old pupil in Brooklyn, who is making quite a name for himself in some parts of the world. Bobby Fischer is chess champion of the United States, so the event didn't exactly seize the country's imagination. However, in chess circles, the young man's achievements made a sensation, and—after classes ended at Erasmus last June—young Bobby went to Europe to try his hand.
He played a little in Russia, though he was unable to book any matches against the top masters. But it was in Yugoslavia that Bobby Fischer really stirred things up. He entered the Portoroz interzone tournament, which brought together some of the world's keenest chess minds. Twenty-one players were entered, with the first six winning the right to qualify for next year's challengers' tourney. The winner of that one gets to play Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960 for the world title.
To make a long story short, Bobby qualified. He came in sixth which means that he now bears the designation of International Grand Master—the youngest in the world—and has started on the road which could lead him to the world's championship. All this makes even Van Cliburn look like a slowpoke.
Bobby Fischer has been called America's greatest chess genius since Paul Morphy, who operated 100 years ago. And Morphy never liked to play his matches in T-Shirt, dungarees and sneakers, which is Bobby's preferred costume. We hope Bobby Fischer continues to develop his phenomenal talent and one day comes home with the world championship. It's always comforting to have a genius in our midst.—New York Herald Tribune.

Bobby Fischer, Grand Master

The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 10

Bobby and Eddie
There was no Broadway ticker-tape welcome to Bobby Fischer when he returned from Europe the other day. No crowd was on hand to greet him when his plane put down at Idlewild. His arrival went unnoticed in the gossip columns.
Eddie Fisher spells his name without “c”. In the days before Bobby came home with barely enough money in his pocket to buy a sandwich, Eddie was getting scads of publicity. His every move was watched closely in New York and Hollywood. Eddie, a singer, was in something of a jam.
Bobby Fischer, you see, is only a chess player. At 15 he achieved in Europe the distinction of being one of six persons in the world to be recognized as masters in this age-old game of kings and queens, of knights, bishops, castles and pawns. They say it takes brains to play chess, even an ordinary game. Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer is proficient to an extraordinary degree.
Eddie Fisher, the singer, his wife Debbie Reynolds and Liz Taylor, relict of Mike Todd, have been linked in the sensational news of the day. It's one of those New York-Hollywood triangles. Some of Eddie's admirers are fearful. He was hissed the other night on the Steve Allen show.
Bobby Fischer has brains. He is one of the world's best chess players. May become champion some day. Using chess terms, he might say that Eddie is a knight in tarnished armor who moved out of his castle to become the pawn of a designing queen.

Bobby and Eddie

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 20

In His Own Country…
There was something rather disgraceful in the way the American chess champion, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, was forced to travel to Europe and back in order to play in the Candidates Chess Tournament in Yugoslavia. To raise his fare over, he had to appear on a television quiz program. He paid his way back with prize money. He placed fifth in the competition to win the title of international grand master and a chance to play in the Challengers Tournament. The winner of that will play the world's champion, Mikhail Botvinnik.
Honored in Europe, Bobby was all but ignored on his return to Brooklyn. His case parallels somewhat that of the pianist Van Cliburn, for Bobby too was besieged by Europeans. Europe and Russia have always been long on chess, recognizing the intellectual quality of the game and its value as a mental and imaginative discipline. There, it is admired as an art, and considered a social grace. Child prodigies are not unusual, but Bobby was the delight of the tournament.

The beginnings of chess are obscured in time. Half a dozen nations lay claim to its invention. The scholars lean to India. Whatever its origin, it bears to-day the hallmark of the genius of the Middle Ages. For 200 years Spain and Italy dominated the game. Later, England and France emerged. Then Germany and neighboring countries of central Europe had 100 years of hegemony, although it was during this period that the New World contributed two champions, Jose R. Capablanca, Cuban diplomat, and Paul Morphy, the American wizard who quit at 22. In 1930, Russia, took changed and the title remains there today.
It is something of a national game in Russia. Interest runs high in all walks of life. Russians expect every educated man to be able to play chess. It is taught in the schools, and is in no sense the esoteric preserve of the intellectuals. Chess masters are national heroes, pampered by the government. So would be Bobby Fischer were he a Russian schoolboy.
But in the United States the game has never been popular. Hundreds of reasons have been advanced to explain this. One of the most plausible is the widespread fallacy that it is a very difficult game to learn and time-consuming to an exaggerated degree. It is neither. There are many who believe that nationwide encouragement here would give America world pre-eminence in the sport.

There certain is good reason to believe that the presence of Americans in this field of endeavor where East and West meet without rancor would have high propaganda value among nations that regard us as hopelessly concerned with business. There is more reason to believe that the game would be an ideal supplement to education in this country.
Yet Bobby is probably the only national champion in any field who in effect has had to thumb his way across the Atlantic to compete against foreign champions. And neither the State Department, with its substantial expenditures for cultural exchange, nor the numerous foundations with their concern for variegated precincts of knowledge, came to the young man's aid.

In His Own Country…

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 4

“This position arose in the interzonal tournament between Bobby Fischer, the American champion (aged 15) and Mikhail Tal, the Russian champion (aged 22). Fischer drew by 1 … but he could instead had forced a win. How?

Bobby Fischer and Mikhail Tal in Interzonal Tournament

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 61

Fischer Places, Made Grandmaster
In a tense last-round battle at the Interzonal Chess Tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn drew with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia. The youthful U.S. chess champion finished in a tie for fifth place, sufficient to qualify for the Challengers Tournament next year, according to a report from the New York Times.
Fischer, with the black pieces, elected to play a variation of the Sicilian Defense which is considered inferior. Gligoric sacrificed a piece for strong attacking chances. Bobby held firmly, however, and after 32 moves a draw was agreed.
Brilliantly successful in his first international tournament, Fischer scored 12-8, winning six games, drawing 12 and losing only to Fridrick Olafsson of Iceland, with whom he tied in the standings, and to Paul Benko, former Hungarian champion, now a U.S. resident.
As a result of his score in this top-flight competition, Fischer became an international grandmaster. The announcement was made at the Stockholm headquarters of the International Chess Federation. Fischer is the youngest player ever to receive this rank.

Fischer Places, Made Grandmaster

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 4 (Referencing: New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 165)

Robert Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn chess wunderkind, has added two more honors to his fast-growing list. Winner of the 1957 Junior Championship, the 1957 U.S. Open and the 1957-'58 U.S. National champion, Fischer has qualified for the next challengers' tournament and has been named an international grandmaster in the process.
For over a month young Bobby toiled through the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, and finally ended in a tie for fifth place with Fridrick Olafsson, Iceland. The top scorers: 1. Tal, USSR, 13½-6½, 2. Gligoric, Yugoslavia, 13-7, 3-4, Benko, Hungary and Petrosian, USSR, 12½-7½, 5-6. Fischer and Olafsson, 12-8.
Fischer was not given a chance to qualify for the challengers', the “experts” were oddly unanimous on this score. Hindsight shows us that Fischer has not been given an outside chance to win in any of the important events he has won save the 1957 Junior U.S. titles. When one examines the names and ponders the chess talent (even genius) of some of the players who failed to qualify, the experts then look merely conservative and cautious— not purblind. Szabo, winner of a previous interzonal and veteran of many international events; Bronstein, qualified for the 1951 match and played 12-12 draw with Botvinnik; Larsen, the brilliant Dane who did so well at Dallas and who won the 1958 Mar del Plata tourney; these and others (Auerbach, Pachman, Filip, Matanovic, Panno, Sherwin, Rossetto, etc) failed to make it but Brooklyn's Bobby did.
According to the New York Times (Sept. 14) young Fischer is now stranded in Europe without funds. While he was in Moscow his expenses were paid by the Soviet sport center and the tournament committee in Portoroz picked up the tab for the duration of the tournament. Comes the end of play and Robert is on his own. Meantime his traveler's checks disappeared and he can't get a plane till Oct. 4. James Sherwin, the other U.S. representative at Portoroz, is reported to have left for New York and Lombardy who acted as Bobby's second has gone to Munich for the chess Olympiad.
The U.S. chess team for the international team tourney at Munich has been set: Reshevsky, Evans, Bisguier and Lombardy are the regulars, Rossolimo and Kashdan the alternates. Bobby Fischer, a junior at Erasmus High, can't spare the time.

Addendum to Fischer: While in Russia Bobby confined his play to blitz and skittles. Fischer wanted to compete against only the best (i.e., Botvinnik, Smyslov, Keres, etc.) and the Russians were offering only “smaller fry.” Bobby said nay, stood his ground, and later proved his point (at Portoroz) but nevertheless came away disappointed.

Fischer...would play only the best? Petrosian is 'small fry'?

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 42

Fischer Qualifies
Young Bobby Fischer lived up to the advanced billing by becoming the youngest player ever to reach the rank of International Grandmaster by virtue of his qualifying for next year's World's Candidates Tournament. Fischer finished strong to tie for fifth place, and claim one of the first sixth places in the Portoroz Interzonal tournament just concluded. Fischer, who only last year said, “They shoulda made me a Grandmaster,” when informed of his elevation to the rank of International Master, did an about face this time, commenting “It's nice to be a Grandmaster, but it won't help me play any better.” Fischer has returned to the U.S. where he is a junior in Brooklyn's Erasmus High School, and by his own admission, “just an average student.”

Fischer Qualifies

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 38

“Bobby Fischer is now in Brooklyn, having had wonderful experience in the tournament at Potoroz, Yugoslavia. He received a prize for fifth place. He has won from Fuster, Sanguinetti, and Larsen; tied with Neikirch, Rosetto, Bronstein, Auerbach, Panno, Tal and Petrosian, the latter two being leading Russian players; and lost to Benko and Olaffson.

Fischer Is Back

Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 74

“Bobby Fischer, the Brooklyn wonder boy of chess, has been awarded the title of international grandmaster. The 15-year-old prodigy is the youngest player to whom the honor has ever been given.
He won the award as a result of his brilliant performance in the Interzonal Tournament held recently in Yugoslavia in which 21 of the world's best players competed. Fischer finished in a tie for fifth place, thus qualifying for next year's Candidates tournament.”

Bobby Fischer, The Brooklyn Boy of Chess Awarded Title of International Grandmaster

The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, September 22, 1958 - Page 6

Sputnik From Brooklyn
Chess has been called the national game of Russia, where everybody seems to play it. Big school and community tournaments are held. Important national tournaments are played in opera houses to overflow crowds while the moves are relayed by loudspeaker to standees in the streets. Since the death in 1946 of Alexander Alekhine, himself an expatriate Russian, the world champion has been a citizen of the USSR. And in each championship match during that period, both contestants have been Russians.
No one would pretend that chess is the national game of the United States. This country has had quite a few international grandmasters, over the years, who ranked among the first 10 in the world, but not one of them ever won a world title. Emmanuel Lasker of Germany did come to live in the United States while he was still world champion, and so did Jose Raoul Capablanca of Cuba. Subsequently Samuel Reshevsky, the erstwhile boy prodigy from Poland, became United States champion and almost, but not quite, qualified to play the champion for the world title.
So it is that 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the most remarkable young player this country has produced since Morphy, may never become a national hero like Elvis Presley. But he is our best prospect to bring to the United States the first world championship ever won by a native American.
Bobby is a tournament-seasoned veteran, who has been playing in national championships for years. He is now United States champion, replacing Reshevsky. He is also a recognized “international grandmaster,” as of this summer —the youngest player of any nation ever to achieve that status.
How he won it is a story in itself. A while back Bobby won a little money on a TV show. He decided to use it to pay his fare to Portoroz, Yugoslavia, and enter the international Candidates Chess Tournament there. Where he was going to get the money to pay his fare back he didn't know. But he got it—as prize money for finishing fifth.
The Candidates Tournament is a high rung on the ladder to the world championship. The six who finished highest in it—and that included Bobby—qualify to play in a special six-man invitational tournament next year. The winner of that gets a shot at the world title by playing a subsequent 24-game match in Russia with Champion Botvinnik. It is an interesting fact that Bobby, though he lost two games in Yugoslavia, was undefeated by any of the Russian candidates.
Nobody thinks that Bobby could beat the champ today, but we can't recall any 15-year-old in chess history who was even thought of as a contender for the world title. Already a tournament veteran, Bobby has been improving steadily, and by the time he faces the champ—as by present indications he will, sooner or later—he may well have improved enough to beat him.
If he can do that, he will deserve to be addressed as the American Sputnik. If chess is the Russian national game, we defy Nikita S. Khrushchev to name any 15-year-old Russian boy who is considered a likely prospect to come to the United States and smash Babe Ruth's home run record.

Sputnik From Brooklyn

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The Index-Journal, Greenwood, South Carolina, Monday, September 22, 1958 - Page 2

Chess 'N Jeans
New York, N.Y.—Bobby Fischer, winner of the U.S. Chess Championship, who won his title while wearing blue jeans will go to Russia June 22 to challenge the Reds. Bobby, a devotee of neat but casual dress, has been given a whole wardrobe of jeans to take with him—seven pair of blue jeans—one for every day of the week! The Denim Council, representing the entire U.S. blue-jean industry presented them to him as a token of good will and esteem.

Chess 'N Jeans

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 19, 1958 - Page 30

Bobby Fischer Hailed
Grandmaster, 15, Gets Watch at Marshall Chess Club

Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States chess champion, who returned from the interzonal tournament in Portoroz, Yugoslavia, last Monday, was honored last night at a reception at the Marshall Chess Club.
While waiting to be called, the international grandmaster from Brooklyn engaged in several five-second games. He defeated all his rivals.
Louis J. Wolff, a director of the club, recounted the accomplishments of Fischer. At the conclusion of his address, Wolff presented a solid gold watch to Fischer.

Bobby Fischer Hailed: Grandmaster, 15, Gets Watch at Marshall Chess Club

This article also appears in,

The Ithaca Journal, Ithaca, New York, Tuesday, September 23, 1958 - Page 6

Chess Master at 15
The average person who plays (or plays at) chess must stand in awe of 15-year-old Bobby Fischer.
Bobby, a Brooklyn high school junior, playing in the International Chess Tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, tied for fifth place. Being among the top six players gives him the rank of an international grand master and puts him in line to compete for the world championship next year.
There are only about 40 active chess players in the world in Bobby Fischer's class. Someone has compared his with a Little Leaguer who pitches 20 winning games in the majors.
Bobby is another teen-ager who has done remarkable things.

Chess Master at 15

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 25

Fischer vs. Larsen at Portoroz
Here is a Bobby Fischer win from the tournament at Portoroz. Danish Grandmaster Bent Larsen, one of the pre-tournament Western hopes, never gets started.

Fischer vs. Larsen at Portoroz

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 273

Eight Will Play In World Chess
Six Stars Who Qualified at Interzonal, Smyslov and Keres Will Compete

Two years ago, at Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ten competed in the challengers' tournament which determined the candidate to meet Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia for the world championship at chess.
It resulted in a triumph for Vassily Smyslov who, in due course, became Botvinnik's successor, but lost the title in the return match. Smyslov, as well as Paul Keres, the runner-up, were seeded into the challengers' test of 1959.
They will meet the six that recently qualified in the interzonal at Portoroz, including Bobby Fischer, U.S. champion. Of these only Tigran Petrosian of Russia again will be competing.
Others are Mikhail Tal the Soviet champion; Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia; Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland; and Pal Benko, a Hungarian refugee soon to return to Cleveland, where he has made his home.
Benko, still in Europe, has been added to the United States delegation at the chess Olympics starting Tuesday in Munich. He will serve in an advisory capacity.
Iceland in Running
The International Federation at Stockholm as intimated that if Argentina fails to be host to the challengers tournament, the bid of Iceland will receive serious consideration.
The enthusiasm for chess in Reykjavik has been heightened by the brilliant showing made by Olafsson at Portoroz, where he finished in fifth place.
Winning eight games, drawing eight and losing four, he made a score of 12—8, equal to that of Fischer. Olafsson will head the team representing Iceland at Munich.
Another selection of games played in Portoroz, including specimens of Olafsson's play and two by Tal, winner of the tournament, have reached here from Yugoslavia, as follows:

Mednis and Fischer Tie
Edmar Mednis, New York University star and a member of the United States intercollegiate team at Varna, shared the honors of the weekly speed tournament with Bobby Fischer. United States champion, at the Marshall Chess Club. Both rolled up a score of 13-2 in a field of 16.
Jack W. Collins, former New York State champion, who was the only player able to win from the 15-year-old international grandmaster, recently returned from Portoroz.
James T. Sherwin, also a contestant in the tournament at Portoroz, placed third with 12-3. Allen Kaufman, 11½-3½, was fourth. Collins tied at 11-4 with Vincent Noga.

TITLE OF ARTICLE

San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 76 (2)

“Bobby Fischer, 15, tied for fifth in the Portoroz Interzonal tourney in Yugoslavia, ahead of a field of players that reads like a who's who who of chess—Szabo, Larsen, Pachman, Filip, Matanovic, Bronstein, Auerbach, and others.”

Championship Chess: Bobby Fischer, 15, tied for fifth in Portoroz Interzonal

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 40

“The strength of these tournaments is shown by the fact that Bobby Fischer failed to finish higher than sixth in either, the same year that he swept America's triple crown, the U.S. Junior, the U.S. Open, and the U.S.C.F. championship events.”

Bobby Fischer Finishes Sixth in Tournament

The Age, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Tuesday, September 30, 1958 - Page 12
By “The Age” Correspondent in New York

Chess Wonder Boy of U.S.
When Bobby Fischer was six year old, his sister Joan went out to the local candy store in Brooklyn and bought a chess board.
Since Bobby was too young to read, Joan — then aged 11 — studied the instructions and explained the moves to her brother.
Soon, as children do, she lost interest in the game.
But Bobby became obsessed by it and now, at the age of 15, is not only junior champion of the United States, but the youngest international chess grand master in the world.
His victory at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, recently, qualifies him to be cone of the six who will compete against one another to play the world champion — Mikhail Botvinnik, of Russia — in 1960.
But already Bobby is regarded by leading chess critics as a genius.
“His is the sort of talent which is rarely, if ever, repeated,” said the president of the Manhattan Chess Club, where Bobby often plays.

TO maintain his talent Bobby concentrates all his interests and energies on chess.

Although “good average” at school, he does not care for lessons; the only literature he ever reads from choice are books of his favorite game.
Outdoor sport, once his chief interest, now takes a poor second place.
And his circle of friends has dwindled since he now has little in common with boys who do not share his enthusiasm for the game.
Bobby's exceptional ability was brought to light when his mother, anxious to keep his mind occupied, advertised in a local newspaper for some child to play chess with him.
A chess critic saw the advertisement and suggested that the boy should enter a chess exhibition at Brooklyn public library, where a well-known chess player was taking on all-comers.

RELUCTANTLY the expert took on seven-year-old Bobby — who surprised everyone by lasting 15 minutes.
Soon Bobby started entering for competitions, and at 13 became the U.S. junior champion.
Now he belongs to one of the most exclusive circles in the world, since there are only about 40 international grand masters still playing chess.
He is the extraordinary of a typically ordinary family. Joan has become a nurse like her mother, and the three of them still live modestly in Brooklyn.
Mrs. Fischer is immensely proud of her son.
“But,” she says, with genuine feeling, “I often wish he had stuck to baseball. He used to get so much more fun out of it.”

Chess Wonder Boy of U.S.

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, October 02, 1958 - Page 18

“Six of America's best chess players—though not including U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer — now are participating in the International Team Championship at Munich, which began Tuesday.”

Six of America's Best Chess Players Excluding Bobby Fischer, Participating in International Team Championship at Munich

San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, October 05, 1958 - Page 84 (2) (3)

“…Take the case of Fischer. In 1956 he placed 8th in the U.S. Open and then won the same tournament in 1957. A big jump. He tied for 5th and 6th in the Interzonal. A bigger jump; this time international scalps were added to his belt. Perhaps the next hurdle will be a little too high, but the damage he may inflict against the Russian contingent might prove their undoing.
Here follows a game by Fischer against Kenneth Smith of Dallas which shows that Fischer (then about 13) was a dangerous antagonist twenty-four months ago.”

Bobby Fischer, “Dangerous Antagonist” at 13 Years Old

This article also appears in,

The Ithaca Journal, Ithaca, New York, Thursday, October 09, 1958 - Page 6

Q. When did Bobby Fischer become the chess champion of the United States?
A. Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who has been playing chess since he was six, won the U.S. championship on Jan. 7, 1958, at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York City. He was 14 years old at the time.

When did Bobby Fischer become the chess champion of the United States?

This article also appears in,

Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 53, (2)

Pawn My Word! Chess Whiz Fischer, 15, Out to Be World Champ

EDITOR'S NOTE: In outward appearance and behavior young Bobby Fischer is much like any other teenager. But his grand passion is chess, and having recently become an international grand master, he's now aiming for the world championship held by Soviet Russia.

NEW YORK—(AP)—There's a Batman comic book on his bedside table and a rock 'n' roll program blaring over his radio, he's slouchy, gangly and crew-cut.
But Batman is sprawled over an open chess book and his nail-bitten fingers are deftly moving chess pieces over the black and white board which means more to him than anything else in his life.
Bobby Fischer doesn't want to be a baseball star or a football player or the most popular fellow at the prom. He wants to be chess champion of the world — and it seems a pretty sure bet he will be.
Most Americans don't know it, but their honor in a big international contest with Russia is riding on the thin shoulders of this 15-year-old boy from Brooklyn.
Bobby is hailed by the experts as the greatest chess mind the world has produced in many years.

He doesn't look like one—he looks more like a farmer's boy than an intellectual—but he is a genius,” says Hans Kmoch, secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club, which is the nerve center of chess, in the United States.
“Fischer is something unique. None of the great ones ever accomplished so much so early.”

He has become an international grand master — the youngest in the long history of the game —and will meet the world's top seven players this year in a challengers' tournament. The exact date and place remain to be determined.
The winner will get a crack at the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik.

* * *

SO FAR, this hasn't meant much to most Americans who look on chess as an intricate pastime for contemplative graybeards. But now even people uninterested in chess are beginning to feel it would be a fine feather in Uncle Sam's cap to have Bobby whip Russia's best players in a game that commands great attention in Europe and South America.

“Bobby himself — who presents a porcupine exterior to the world—doesn't show much interest in possible cold war implications of his career. He just wants to be champion.

If he makes it this try, he'll be the youngest world champion in chess history — and only the second American ever to occupy that lofty position.

The first U.S. champion was Paul Morphy, who turned the trick at 21 a century ago.
Bobby, who could give a clam lessons on how to keep its mouth shut, won't say what he thinks of his chances. Nobody else thinks he will make it this time.
But then, nobody thought he could win the American chess championship at 14 and nobody expected him to do very well at the recent international chess tournament in Yugoslavia.

“As the big chess players, all champions in their own countries, sat down opposite the bony young American, each informed that he would be beaten.”

Some were nicer than others —they said they were sorry to have to defeat him.
They didn't need to be. Most of them didn't. Bobby playing in his first international competition, pulled out of his early difficulties and tied for fifth place—winning his place in the star-studded challengers.

* * *

BOBBY is a tall boy with the classic adolescent slump and light brown hair. He eyes strangers in general and reporters in particular with glum distrust.
“Most reporters ask stupid questions. What do I eat for breakfast? That's not important. Why don't they ask about chess?” he said.
He sat on his bed, idly moving the figures on the chess board in front of him. He was dressed as usual in a sports shirt. Bobby won the American chess championship in dungarees and a T-shirt; no one remembers seeing him in a coat and tie.

The Russians keep winning the big ones in chess, he said because “everybody there plays. They're subsidized. Sure they put out a lot of books. Yeah, I can read a little Russian—I can read the moves. I can speak a little. Mr. Pressman at NYU (New York University) taught me.

“No you don't talk at chess tournaments. Why should you talk? Except when you offer a draw. But you can say anything. They know what you mean. Chess players speak lots of languages.
“Fun? No, a tournament's no fun, but they're all right.”

Does he think he can win the challengers' and get a shot at the championship? He shrugged and twisted his lip. “I don't know.”
Wouldn't it be nice to bring the world chess crown back to the United States for the first time in a 100 years?

A sudden, charming grin lit his face. And all at once you could see why the people who have got inside his prickly shell like Bobby Fischer very much indeed.
“It would be nice,” he agreed.

* * *

BOBBY has few friends his own age. He come home from school about 2 o'clock and picks up a chess book. Every spare minute, he is either reading about chess, analyzing moves on his bedside chess board or going somewhere to play chess.
Girls are nothing to him.
“Girls can't play chess,” he says.

“Bobby isn't interested in anybody unless they play chess—and there just aren't many kids who like it,” says Mrs. Fischer.
To make friends with Bobby, you not only have to play chess—you have to play good chess.

Maurice Kasper, president of the Manhattan Chess Club, commented:
“We have about 100 students in the club that Bobby could associate with. But he is so much superior, you see. He just plays with the stronger players.
Yes, Bobby definitely does think well of himself. But he is a phenomenon that happens once in a hundred years—in a thousand.
“He is also a young boy. He is not accustomed to such publicity and he can't handle it yet. But you must give him a little time. He is a good boy.”

Until last year, Bobby was little more than a good average student. But he is settling down and working hard. He scored an excellent 97 in New York's State's Regents exam on geometry last spring.

Prof. Aaron Pressman, who volunteered to tutor Bobby in Russian before the Yugoslav tournament, say Bobby is very bright. Pressman, who seems fond of Bobby adds that the boy worked very hard and learned rapidly.

* * *

BOBBY lives with his mother in a small fourth-floor walkup apartment in a neat section of Brooklyn. His 21-year-old sister, Joan, lived there too until her marriage last month. Their parents separated when Bobby was 2.
Mrs. Fischer, a University of Colorado graduate is a registered nurse now earning her MA degree. Bobby, she says is no disciplinary problem.

“There's nothing to discipline him about,” Mrs. Fischer explains. “The only thing I do is nag him to take his nose out of his chess books and go outside for some fresh air.

“You know, that's what aggravates me so. He used to be terrific in athletics. He didn't talk until he was practically 2 years old, but he was climbing all over the place.”
Bobby started in the game at age 6 when Joan got a chess set and the two puzzled out the directions. Mrs. Fischer doesn't know a thing about chess.

“I spent four years trying to get him away from it, but I've given up now,” she says, “He was only 8 when he first went to the Brooklyn Chess Club. He was pretty sensitive and they used to tease him about thinking he could play with grownups. He played about four years before he won at all.”

“I tried to stop him. The school people say I should try to get him away from it. He used to get awfully upset.
“You know, people say it's the publicity that attracts him to chess. Well, there wasn't any glory for years. It was all discouragement.”

Pawn My Word! Chess Whiz Fischer, 15, Out to Be World Champ

The Dispatch, Moline, Illinois, Thursday, October 16, 1958 - Page 6

Genius and Joy
One of the marks of genius, it is said, is single-mindedness, an ability to shut out the world in the pursuit of an objective. A recent article about Sigmund Freud credits him with this knack.
And now there is Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old Brooklyn boy who has become one of the world masters of chess. “Bobby has few friends his own age,” said the news item. “He comes home from school about 2 o'clock and picks up a chess book. Every spare minute, he is either reading about chess, analyzing moves on his bedside chess board, or going somewhere to play chess.”
The genius no doubt finds the same degree of joy in his life as anyone else. But he certainly misses a lot.

Genius and Joy

This article also appears in,

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 25

Bobby Fischer Has Chess Experts Agog
PORTOROZ, Yugoslavia (AP)— It's October, a little more than a month after the interzonal chess tournament, and in America the talk is of football.
But here in Yugoslavia and throughout Europe, the people have never heard of Navy Joe's Tranchini or Ohio State's Frank Kremblas.
And even if they had, they would prefer to talk about Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn boy with the mind of a quarterback, the self-discipline of a linebacker, and the title of grand master of chess.
Chances are Bobby, the boy, or Robert, as he prefers to be called when playing chess, has never heard of Tranchini or Kremblas either. And they may not have heard of him.

Started at Age 6
Bobby's mother says there was a time when he used to be very good at athletics, but that must have been before he reached the age of six. That's when he learned the moves of chess and he hasn't stopped studying them since. He says he is interested in virtually nothing else.
This is exceptional in the United States where the game is taken far less seriously than football, and even in Europe, where chess has undergone more refinements than the split - T, the chess masters are amazed at the genius of the gangling Fischer.
A tall boy with the classic adolescent slump, he doesn't look like a quarterback. He just thinks like one.

Youngest in History
He became the youngest grandmaster in history by his expert play at the Interzonal tournament here.
He left behind him eight world best grand masters and seven international masters. He failed to place first but captured the title of grand master and qualified for the Tournament of Candidates, the third stage in world championship competition.
Bobby impressed fellow competitors with his mature play in his first international tournament. He knew exactly what he wanted. The toughness of the will with which he fulfilled his aim was wonderful.
He is now a candidate for the world championship held by Russian Grand Master Mikhail Botvinik. Fischer can challenge Botvinik in 1960 if he wins next year's Tournament of Candidates.

Most Serious Player
Bobby, who won the U.S. Junio title in 1956 and the U.S. Open this year, was the most serious player in the interzonal tourney.
Only the Russians with their famous discipline could match him. But while the Russians occasionally went for a swim or a walk, Bobby remained in the tournament hall or in his hotel room. His self-imposed discipline was amazing, and he grew angry at reporters who kept stressing his age. He said he wanted to be judged only on his play.
When the tournament began Bobby said privately: “I plan to qualify for the tournament of candidates. To achieve that it is necessary to draw with the great players and some of the weaker. That will bring me enough points to qualify.”

Followed Plan
He followed his plan stubbornly and with success. Some of his foes thought they could trap “The Boy” by bizarre variations or surprise him with an unusual move to break his opposition.
But the lad proved them wrong. Johnny Lujack never called a cooler football game.
Bobby is regarded here as the first challenger in years to Russian chess supremacy.
But like the football players, he must go to school while Russian stars dedicate almost their entire time to chess.

Bobby Fischer Has Chess Experts Agog

San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 92

Championship Chess: Fischer Versus Dallas, Texas' Fred Tears
“From the same tournament, another Bobby Fischer game. Again he is pitted against a Texan, Fred Tears from Dallas, who holds him to a draw. White elects to play the closed variation of the Sicilian which gives Black little trouble.”

Championship Chess: Fischer Versus Dallas, Texas' Fred Tears

The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Sunday, October 26, 1958 - Page 89

“Of course, the highlight of the tournament is the success of the 15-year-old U.S. champion, Bobby Fischer. The boy-wonder proved himself against the world's best. Can the young grandmaster become a real challenge to the Russian supremacy?

Bobby Fischer Proves Himself Against The World's Best

News-Record Neenah, Wisconsin Friday, October 31, 1958 - Page 4

Roving Reporter
The Boston Globe was concerned with 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn who had to appear on TV to get money for his fare to Europe, and to get back had to win prize cash—he is the lad who played chess in the Yugoslavia tournament.
And the paper commented that no governmental cultural aid funds, or help from private foundations, was needed for the chess trip.

Roving Reporter

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, November 02, 1958 - Page 64

“A copy of ‘Leaves of Chess,’ issue No. 10, has been received, and devotes most of the space to the feats of Bobby Fischer. Several of his games at Portoroz are published. It also tells that when Bobby was seven years old, he tried to secure games with other young players. Herman Helms, chess editor of the Brooklyn Eagle, suggested several ways in which he might contact other players.”

Leaves of Chess

The Ottawa Citizen Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Monday, November 03, 1958 - Page 6

Sports Of Two Continents
Over in Yugoslavia, and throughout Europe for that matter, the name of Mickey Mantle means nothing. But the name of Bobby Fischer means much to a good many people. Even in his own United States 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, now a grand master of chess, isn't a figure of renown, certainly not like the master swatter of baseballs. Of course, the New York Yankees have never performed in Yugoslavia, whereas Grand Master Fischer has, to the amazement of all. His latest accolades were bestowed at the recent international chess tournament held in that country.
This is not to suggest that Europeans are absorbed in chess to the exclusion of other amusements. But there are a number of sports in which they have little or no interest. Baseball is one of these, and football as generally understood in both the United States and Canada is another. In this respect there is a profound gulf between the two continents in a sports sense. Soccer and track and field sports are trans-Atlantic in scope; so nowadays is ice hockey. Skiing, swimming, tennis and golf are also popular in both continents.
But the great mass spectator sports in the United States remain football and baseball, to which Europeans continue indifferent. And since soccer has now become the most widely distributed of all sports throughout the world, it would seem that in some major sporting respects the U.S. (like Canada) dwells in relative isolation.
So far as Canada is concerned, however, the post-war influx of immigrants from Europe may be changing this situation, for they have begun to stimulate interest here in the game of soccer. And perhaps chess as well. All this should do no harm to the cause of international understanding.

Sports Of Two Continents

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, November 09, 1958 - Page 72

Soviets fail to overwhelm all competition
For the first time in years the Soviet contingent failed to overwhelm all opposition. True, they did well in gaining two places in the first six; but they were far from being so absolutely powerful as they had been in the other Interzone Tournaments. The wholesome result is that when next year's Candidates Tournament is played there will be an even number — four Soviet players, Smyslov, Keres, Tal and Petrosian, and four from the rest of the world, Gligoric, Benko, Fischer and Olafsson.

Strangely enough, quite a number of the other young players had the habit of running very short of time. Olafsson was particularly inclined to do so, while Bobby Fischer seems to be following in Reshevsky's footsteps in this field as in others.

Soviets fail to overwhelm all competition

This quote also appears in the following:

The Winona Daily News, Winona, Minnesota, Monday, November 03, 1958 - Page 12

Bobby Fischer, the chess whiz, is described as an “average teenager.” It's about like picking the prettiest girl in town and naming her Miss Average Girl.

Bobby Fischer Described as Average Teen

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 78

Much more astonishing was the triumph of 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. Starting off a little insecurely, he seemed to gather fresh strength and confidence with every round, until at the end it was the grand masters who were afraid of him. What interested the onlooker is the nature of his style. Unlike the normal good boy player, he does not spend his time looking for combinations. If, the complications come, then he can “ride the whirlwind and command the storm” with a calm ease worthy of a Capablanca. He can produce the appropriate combination at the appropriate moment, but for the most part he is content to win by utilizing a remarkably mature positional judgment.
The possibilities of such a player are truly enormous. Practically no bounds can be set on the development of a genius that is based on such secure foundations. He has already achieved much—U.S. champion and international grandmaster at 15—but certainly will achieve considerably more in the future.
Some six months ago I wrote that it would not be long before Bobby Fischer would be knocking at the door that led to the world championship, and he already is knocking louder than I or most other people anticipated.

Astonishing Triumph of 15-Year-Old Bobby Fischer

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, November 20, 1958 - Page 6

“Perhaps in the next year or two Tal and Bobby Fischer will be fighting it out for the title now held by Botvinnik.”

Bobby Fischer vs Tal in Future Battle for Title Held by Botvinnik

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, November 23, 1958 - Page 38

“Bobby Fischer, who scored nicely over former U.S. Open and North Central winner Al Sandrin in the game below, finished only sixth.”

Bobby Fischer Finishes Sixth

The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Sunday, November 23, 1958 - Page 156

Checkmated at the Chess Table
“Few of the many things that went wrong can be laid to Spann, however. Most involved the old, old, diplomatic frictions of east versus west, or more specifically, U.S. versus U.S.S.R.
When he lined up his team, Spann hoped he could take the country's top six players. But the U.S. champion, Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old Brooklyn school boy couldn't go. Truancy laws in his state wouldn't yield to the team's great need for the boy genius.
No. 1 seeded player Samuel Reshevsky of New York, (he has never played U.S. champ Fischer and because he held the championship for so many years, still is seeded first) is an Orthodox Jew and was lost for eight days—Jewish Rosh Hashannah, Yom Kippur and the weekly sabbath.

Other teams also refused to honor the late hours play agreement for Reshevsky. “They said they were tired of the ‘Reshevsky problem’.”
Paul Benko, seeded third behind Fischer, is a Hungarian refugee and not yet a U.S. citizen. So he also was lost.

Checkmated at the Chess Table

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 04, 1958 - Page 56

Reshevsky In Chess: Fischer Also in U.S. Tourney Starting Here on Dec. 18
The first of eleven rounds in the tournament for the United States championship and the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy will get under way on Thursday evening, Dec. 18, at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Invitations were sent to all parts of the country by the joint committee of the U.S. Chess Federation and the American Chess Foundation.
Acceptances by twelve masters from the Eastern seaboard resulted. They included last year's winner, Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old Brooklyn student, and Samuel Reshevsky, an international grandmaster.
The following pairings for the first round were released yesterday:

Reshevsky In Chess: Fischer Also in U.S. Tourney Starting Here on Dec. 18

This article also appears in,

The Marion Star, Marion, Ohio, Thursday, December 04, 1958 - Page 40

Chess Champ Gives Mother New Worries
American Youngster Encounters Problems In European Travels

NEW YORK (AP)—Ever have trouble coping with your teen-ager? How would you like it if he were a genius?
“It's not easy,” says Mrs. Regina Fischer of Brooklyn.
Her 15-year-old son, Bobby, is a genius at chess. He won the United States championship at 14 and became the youngest international Grand Master in history last summer.
His one dream is to snatch the world chess crown from the present champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik.
One of Mrs. Fischer's definitely “not easy” moments came last summer when Bobby appeared to be stranded in Yugoslavia after his first international tournament.

Unable To Get Plane
“He had a round trip ticket, but nobody made any reservations for him and he couldn't get a plane. I knew he'd spent most of his money at the World Fair in Belgium and I was afraid the Yugoslav Chess Federation wouldn't go on paying for him after the tournament had ended.
“I went to the Yugoslav Embassy but it was the weekend and I couldn't find anybody. I tried to call Bobby, but they said he had left by train.
“I was really worried. I knew he was loaded down with books and I didn't see how he could manage. He doesn't speak the languages. I could just see him sleeping in a train station somewhere and people stealing everything he had.”
But Bobby used his tournament prize money to get to Munich where he found plane space home.
Chess is not a popular game and there are no funds to send the American champion to tournaments. Bobby won two tickets to Yugoslavia on a television program. His 21-year-old sister, Joan, took the second.

Remains at Home
“Bobby doesn't like the idea of his mother going around with him to tournaments. Besides, I figured it would be better for me to be here in case anything was needed—, primarily.”
She laughed ruefully—a slender, dark-haired woman with a smiling mouth in a gamine face. The Fischers separated when Bobby was 2 and Mrs. Fischer raised her two children on her earnings as a nurse.
“I don't discipline Bobby. He's too big. Anyway, there's not much to say. He comes home and sticks his nose in a chess book, stops to eat, and he's back again until it's time to go to bed.
“Bobby's one of the ones who play for blood, as they say in chess. He's serious. He has to study all the time. The countries publish pamphlets and books at a great rate—new openings always being worked out.
“He's not interested in girls yet—they don't play chess. He doesn't smoke or drink. He does chew his nails down to the bone, but I'm afraid to make him stop. I don't know what he might take up.
“Some of these chess players twitch all over. Honest. They start with an eye and twitch down to their feet and start again. I'd rather he chewed his nails.”

Becomes YMCA Member
“The only thing I do is nag him to get some fresh air. This year he's joined the “Y” and says he's going to get in better physical shape.
“He used to be wonderful at sports—in fact, he himself used to say he wanted to be a baseball player.
“I don't know a thing about chess. In fact, I tried to make him stop for four years. But I've given up now.”

Chess Champ Gives Mother New Worries

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 42

Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old grandmaster from Brooklyn and current titleholder, will attempt to repeat his triumph of a year ago.

Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old grandmaster from Brooklyn and current titleholder, will attempt to repeat his triumph of a year ago.

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 119

Championship Chess
By BLAKE STEVENS
Texas State Chess Champion
The season for simultaneous exhibitions is here, with several Texas cities sponsoring these events, George Koltanowski makes several trips a year through Southern states, and San Antonio invited him to lecture and play against local enthusiasts a few weeks ago.
“Kolty” as his friends call him, made a fine score, winning 21 games and drawing two. He had trouble in only one game when, in an effort to save a pawn, he lost his queen for two pieces.
After the game was concluded, his opponent irked by losing, told him that he should have won the game, to which Kolty replied, “I made one mistake, you made one mistake, but unfortunately, yours was the last mistake.”
His lecture was witty and entertaining, with the core of it concerning Bobby Fischer's chance at garnering the world chess crown. Mr. Koltanowski feels, as I do, that Fischer's potentialities can not easily be judged, that he has fooled the wise men more than once and might do it again.
Actually, if Fischer places one from the bottom, this would be quite an accomplishment when one considers the calibre of players against whom he will be pitted in the Candidates Tournament.

Surprised Russians
Fischer, as Kolty pointed out, refused to play in simultaneous tournaments or against lesser Russian masters on his recent trip to the U.S.S.R., which surprised (and irritated) the Russians. This shows remarkable wisdom on the part of this 15 year old
The Russians, it should be noted, did not give Fischer the chance of playing their top men, Smyslov, Keres, Tahl, or Bronstein. It is not impossible that Fischer could become the chess champion of the world.
Mr. Koltanowski concluded with two games played blindfolded at the same time, which he won handily. He then called for questions from the audience. At midnight the lecture ended, and everyone went home well satisfied.

Candidates Tournament

The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Sunday, November 09, 1958 - Page 15

“In his foreword the author mentions numbers of young chess players, pointing out that the present champion for the U.S. is 14 year-old Bobby Fischer and that many seven year olds are learning the game.”

Junior High Crowd Can Find Plenty of Good Reading

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 14, 1958 - Page 55

“We would have taken the third-place medal, but the first two places would still have been out of reach. So you ask “Can we ever win, and if so, how?” I reply, “Yes, by going to Leipzig in 1960 with six players (instead of five) and by making sure that Bobby Fischer and Paul Benko are included!”

“Our solid showing at Munich plus the fine victories of Fischer and Benko at Portoroz have us twinkling brightly in the world chess tournament. We can hold our heads high!”

Bobby Fischer and Paul Benko at Munich

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Wednesday, December 17, 1958 - Page 3

Olaffson To Play At Hastings
International tournament
by a Chess Correspondent
Olaffson, the Icelandic grandmaster, will be among the chess players from eight countries taking part in the Hastings international chess tournament, when it starts on December 29. It is also hoped that Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old American prodigy, will be able to compete, but this is not certain yet.
Other players in the premier section will be Barden and Clarke (England). Wade (New Zealand), Radoicic (Yugoslavia), Darga (West Germany), Uhlman (East Germany), Portisch (Hungary), and Duckstein (Austria).

Olaffson To Play At Hastings

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 18, 1958 - Page 6

Bobby Fischer to Defend Crown at Tournament
One year ago 14-year-old Bobby Fischer won the U.S. National-Rosenwald Tournament, adding the national title to the U.S. Open and National Junior championships that he already held.
Starting tonight Bobby will defend the national crown against the best players that can be mustered against him. He comes up to the tournament with still further laurels, having during the past summer qualified at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, for the challenger's tournament next year which will produce the next opponent of Champion Mikhail Botvinnik for the world's championship. Bobby finished a brilliant fifth in his first big international test and fully lived up to his precedent-shattering achievements of the previous year in this country.
Fischer has been attending his classes in a Brooklyn high school since returning from Europe and it remains to be seen whether he will show signs of “rust” in defending his national crown. At his age and apparent stage of chess development that seems unlikely.

Bobby Fischer to Defend Crown at Tournament

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, December 19, 1958 - Page 50

Grandmaster Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15 year old whiz kid of chess, and William Lombardy of New York, his former coach, adjourned after 43 moves Thursday night in the annual United States chess championship in New York.

Grandmaster Bobby Fischer and William Lombardy Adjourn After 43 Moves

The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 26

Formidable List at Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament
“Lessing J. Rosenwald tournament for the United States chess championship started in New York city Dec. 18 and will continue to Jan. 5.
The tournament is under the auspices of the American Chess Foundation and the U.S. Chess Federation. Players are: Pal Benko, Arthur Bisguier, Donald Byrne, Robert Byrne, Larry Evans, Bobby Fischer, champion, Robert Kalme, William Lombardy, Ed Mednis, Samuel Reshevsky, James Sherwin and Raymond Weinstein. This formidable list includes give grandmasters. Benko, Evans, Bisguier, Fischer and Reshevsky. Benko's name comes as a surprise because he wasn't eligible to represent the U.S.A. at Munich.
The more youngsters make their championship debuts this year, Kalme and Weinstein, the U.S. junior champion.
All the critics are asking can Fischer repeat? Will Reshevsky come back? I urge you to keep your eyes on Benko.”

Formidable List at Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 26

Evans Wins; Leads U.S. Chess Meet
New York, Dec. 20 (AP) — Larry Evans of New York defeated Edmar Mednis, a New York university student, in the only match played to decision Saturday in the third round of the United States chess championship tournament. Evans won in 22 moves and leads the field with a 2-0 record.
Defending champion Bobby Fischer, 15 year old Brooklyn boy wonder, played his third consecutive adjourned match, this time with James T. Sherwin of New York.
Also adjourned were matches between William Lombardy of New York and Paul Benko, a Hungarian exile; Charles Kalme of Philadelphia and Raymond Weinstein of New York; and Arthur Bisguier of New York and Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich.
Robert Byrne, Bisguier, Sherwin, and Weinstein are 1-1, Kalme, Donald Byrne, Lombardy, and Samuel Reschevsky ½-½, Benko and Mednis ½-1½, and Fischer 0-0.

Evans Wins; Leads U.S. Chess Meet

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Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 24

Evans Wins To Take Chess Tourney Lead
NEW YORK (AP)—Larry Evans of New York defeated Edmar Mednis, a student at NYU, in the only match played to decision yesterday in the third round of the U.S. Chess Championships.
Defending Champion Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn boy wonder, played his third straight adjourned match, this time with James T. Sherwin of New York.
Also adjourned were matches between William Lombardy of New York and Paul Benko, a Hungarian exile living here; Charles Kalme of Philadelphia and Raymond Weinstein of New York; and Arthur Bisguier of New York and Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich.
Reschevsky, Byrne Play
Samuel Reschevsky of New York, five-time national champion, and Robert Byrne of Indianapolis started their match late last night. Evans, who won in 22 moves, leads the field with a 2-0 record with one match adjourned. Donald Byrne, Lombardy, and Reschevsky ½-½, Benko and Mednis ½-½, and Fischer 0-0.
The fourth round will be played today with the adjourned matches due to be played off Monday in the round robin competition.

Evans Wins To Take Chess Tourney Lead

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 32

Twelve Masters Vie In Championship Meet

“Taking part are 12 masters and five international grandmasters. Bobby Fischer, the 15-years-old Brooklyn prodigy who acquired a grand mastership in Europe last summer, is defending champion. His chief rival is Samuel Reshevsky, America's international ace who was runner-up in last year's Rosenwald.

Twelve Masters Vie In Championship Meet

Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Monday, December 22, 1958 - Page 38

Evans Leads Chess Meet In Tourney at New York
NEW YORK, Dec. 22 (AP)— Larry Evans of New York extended his lead in the U.S. chess championships yesterday, defeating Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 36 moves for his third victory.
In four rounds of play—a third of the round robin distance—Evans has a 3-0 record with one adjournment.
Defending champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn played his fourth straight adjourned match, this time with Raymond Weinstein of New York.

Evans Leads Chess Meet In Tourney at New York

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Tuesday, December 23, 1958 - Page 28

Evans Loses 1st Chess Match
New York, Dec. 22 (AP) — Larry Evans of New York went down to his first defeat in the U.S. chess championships Monday night and when the action was over he was just a half-point ahead of defending champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn.
Donald Byrne of Indianapolis licked Evans while Fischer, the teen-age terror of world chess, won two matches and drew once.
That left Evans with a 3-1 record and Fischer with a 2½-½. All Bobby's previous matches had been adjourned so he went into action with no record.

Evans Loses 1st Chess Match

This article also appears in,

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, December 24, 1958 - Page 23

3-Way Tie In Chess Play
NEW YORK (AP) — Defending Champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn and former titleholder Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y., pulled into a deadlock with Larry Evans of New York last night in the U.S. Chess Championships.
With five rounds completed and six more to go, Fischer, the teenager; Reshevsky a world Grand Master, and Evans all have 3-1 records.
Fischer fought to a draw with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee in 29 moves while Reshevsky turned back Ray Weinstein, a Brooklyn College student, in 28 moves.
The match between Evans and Charles Kalne of Philadelphia was adjourned after 40 moves.
James Sherwin of New York, who is in fourth place with a 3-2 mark, whipped Don Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., in 36 moves.

TITLE OF ARTICLE

This article also appears in,

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 39

15-Year-Old Fischer Leads Chess Tourney
New York, Dec. 24 (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, defending champion in the U.S. chess championships, defeated veteran Samuel Reshevsky of New York Wednesday and moved into first place halfway through the round robin tournament.
Fischer, now 4-1 with one adjournment, scored his sixth round victory in 42 moves over Reshevsky, five-time U.S. champion. Other sixth round matches are scheduled Friday. There will be no play Christmas Day.
In a fourth round match completed today, Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., defeated world junior champion William Lombardy of New York in 56 moves.

15-Year-Old Fischer Leads Chess Tourney

This article also appears in,

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 48

Boy, 15, Beats America's Ace Chess Player
New York, Dec. 24 [Special]
—The 15 year old United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, created a sensation Wednesday at the Manhattan Chess club by defeating Samuel Reshevsky, America's international ace, in their sixth-round game in the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy tournament.
The added point gave Fischer a score of 4-1 in the field of 12 and ended a three-way tie for the lead among Reshevsky, Larry Evans and Fischer. The Fischer-Reschevsky match was played ahead of the regular schedule. In addition, Fischer has an adjourned game pending from the fourth round.

Boy, 15, Beats America's Ace Chess Player

The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 33

Chess Whiz Wins
NEW YORK (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, defending champion in the U.S. chess championships, defeated veteran Samuel Reschevsky of New York Wednesday and moved into first place halfway through the round robin tournament.
Fischer, now 4-1 with one adjournment, scored his sixth round victory in 42 moves over Reschevsky, five-time U.S. champion.

Chess Whiz Wins

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, December 26, 1958 - Page 18

Fischer Beats Reschevsky, Leads Chess
NEW YORK (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, defending champion in the U.S. Chess Championships, defeated veteran Samuel Reschevsky of New York yesterday and moved into first place halfway through the round robin tournament.
Fischer, now 4-1 with one adjournment, scored his sixth round victory in 42 moves over Reschevsky, five-time U.S. champion. Other sixth round matches are scheduled today. There was no play Christmas.
In a fourth round match completed Wednesday, Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., defeated World Junior Champion William Lombardy of New York in 65 moves.
Standings of the 12 competitors: Fischer 4-1, Larry Evans of New York 3-1, Reschevsky and James Sherwin of New York 3-2, Arthur Bisguier, New York, 2½-1½, Lombardy and Donald Byrne 2½-2½ Robert Byrne of Indianapolis 2-3, Raymond Weinstein of New York 1½-2½, Edmar Mednis, New York Univ., 1-2, Charles Kalme of Philadelphia 1-3, Paul Benko of New York 1-4.

Fischer Beats Reschevsky, Leads Chess

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 30

Fischer, 15, Holds Lead in U.S. Chess
New York, Dec. 27—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15 year old United States chess champion, and Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., agreed to a draw after 48 moves in the seventh round of the annual United States championship Saturday.
Fischer conducted the black pieces, and altho he was on the defensive in the opening, he soon took the aggressive, sacrificed the exchange and, from then on, set the pace.
They agreed to the draw when preparations had been made to adjourn after a five hour session. Fischer then led the field of 12 with a score of 4½-1½. He still had an unfinished game from the fourth round. He will meet Larry Evans, second with 4-1, in the eighth round.
The fist game to be finished in the seventh round was a draw in 35 moves between Charles Kalme of Philadelphia and William Lombardy, City College of New York and world junior champion.

Fischer, 15, Holds Lead in U.S. Chess

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 28

U.S. Chess Championship
The annual Rosenwald Tournament for the United States Chess Championship is now being held in New York City, starting Dec. 18 and running through Jan. 5. Prominent players entered are Paul Benko, Arthur Bisguier, Donald Byrne, Robert Byrne, Larry Evans, Bobby Fischer, Robert Kalme, William Lombardy, Edmond Mednis, Samuel Reshevsky, James Sherwin, Raymond Weinstein. Play will be at the Manhattan and Marshall clubs.

U.S. Chess Championship

This article also appears in,

Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 15

Chess Stalemate
New York (AP) — Larry Evans of New York defeated Ray Weinstein of Brooklyn in 38 moves Friday night and in the process moved back into a tie for first place with Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn in the National Chess championships. Each has a 4-1 record.

Chess Stalemate

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 74

Evans and Fischer Lead in Title Play
Defending Champion Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy, adjourned all of his first four games in one day, with victories over James T. Sherwin and Charles Kalme and a draw against World Junior Champion William Lombardy.
The most exciting finish was against Kalme, a game in which Fischer had sacrificed a piece to obtain two passed pawns far up in his opponent's territory. Supported by Fischer's king, the pawns proved a winning force. As a result Fischer acquired a score of 2½-½, the best percentage of the tournament to date.

Evans and Fischer Lead in Title Play

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 26

Fischer In Front In Chess Tourney
Defender Has 5-2 Score in U.S. Event—Reshevsky Winner Over Evans

With eight games pending from earlier rounds of the United States chess championship for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy, the 15-year-old defender, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, had a score of 5—2 last night to lead the field of twelve at the Marshall Chess Club.
Fischer drew with Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., former national open champion, in forty-eight moves. Fischer has won three games outright, including his victory over Samuel Reshevsky, whom he succeeded as titleholder. The youngster's four drawn games account for the 2 points in the lost column.
Reshevsky, in turn, defeated Larry Evans, former champion. These two and Arthur B. Bisguier, ex-champion, were in a triple, tie for second place, each with 4½—2½.
James T. Sherwin, New York attorney, stood fifth with 4—3, followed by William Lombardy, City College and world junior champion, and Donald Byrne, each with 3½—2½.

After a draw with Donald Byrne in the seventh round on Saturday, Fischer had a score of 4½-1½ in the United States chess championship. Evans whose seventh-round game with Reshevsky was postponed, was Fischer's chief rival with a 4-1 score.

Fischer In Front In Chess Tourney

This article also appears in,

Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 14

Young American Chess Player Still in First
NEW YORK (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old defending champion from New York strengthened his hold on first place in the United States championship Sunday when he drew with Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., after 40 moves in the seventh round.
The draw gave Fischer a 5-2 record. Bobby has not lost a match but has drawn in four. There are nine rounds in the tournament.
Former champion Samuel Reshevsky moved into a tie for second place with a 4½-2½ mark when he defeated Larry Evans of New York in 39 moves. Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, who also has a 4½-2½ record, defeated Charles Kalme, Philadelphia, in 40 moves.

Young American Chess Player Still in First

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 15

Fischer Takes Lead In National Chess
New York, Dec. 28 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn's teen-age whiz kid, moved into first place in the National chess championships last night when he drew with Don Byrne, of Valparaiso, Ind., in 48 moves.
The half point he gained enabled him to inch ahead of Larry Evans, of New York. Bobby now has 4½ points to 4 for Evans. They will go right on to the title.
There were two other draws in the night's action; Charles Kalme, of Philadelphia, and William Lombardy, of New York, finished in a deadlock in 38 moves, and Ray Weinstein, of Brooklyn, and Arthur Bisguier, of New York, finished even in 56 moves.

Bobby Fischer 1958 News Article

Battle Creek Enquirer, Battle Creek, Michigan, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 4

Olivet Player Ties Leader In 40 Chess Moves
NEW YORK — (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old defending champion from New York, strengthened his hold on first place in the National Chess championships yesterday when he drew with Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., after 40 moves.
The draw gave Fischer a 5-2 record. Bobby has not lost a match but had drawn in four. Two draws count as one loss.
Former champion Samuel Reshevsky moved into a tie for second place with a 4½-2½ mark when he defeated Larry Evans of New York in 39 moves. Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, who also has a 4½-2½ record, defeated Charles Kalme, Philadelphia, in 40 moves.
James Sherwin and Edmar Mednis, both of New York, drew in a 40-move match.

Olivet Player Ties Leader In 40 Chess Moves

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 60

“Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn continues in first place with 4½ won against 1½ lost.

Bobby Fischer Continues in First Place

The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 2

Bobby Fischer, 15, defending champion from New York, strengthened his hold on first place in the National Chess Championships in New York City when he drew with Donald Byrne, Olivet, Mich., after 40 moves, giving him a 5-2 record.

Bobby Fischer Strengthens Hold on First Place

Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 9

Chess Champion Increases Lead
New York, Dec. 29 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old defending champion from New York, strengthened his hold on first place in the National Chess championships yesterday when he drew with Donald Byrne of Brooklyn, N.Y. after 40 moves.
The draw gave Fischer a 5-2 record. Bobby has not lost a match but has drawn in four. Two draws count as one loss.
Former Champion Samuel Reshevsky moved into a tie for second place with a 4½-2½ mark when he defeated Larry Evans of New York in 39 moves. Arthur B. Bisguier of New York, who also has a 4½-2½ record, defeated Charles Kalme, Philadelphia, in 40 moves.
James Sherwin and Edmar Mednis, both of New York, drew in a 40-move match.
• • •
Byrne, former faculty member at Olivet college, is now on the teaching staff at Valparaiso university.

Chess Champion Increases Lead

Vidette-Messenger of Porter County, Valparaiso, Indiana, Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 7

VU Professor In U.S. Chess Championships
Donald Byrne, 158 Franklin, member of the Valparaiso university department of English faculty, is in New York competing in the United States Chess championships.
As of last weekend, he was seventh in the standings after agreeing to a draw after 48 moves with Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old US champion. Byrne's brother, Robert of Indianapolis, was eighth.
The tournament, being played at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess clubs, will end Sunday by which time all players will have competed against each other. Byrne has made arrangements to play his final match Saturday so he may return here for the start of classes at VU Monday.
Byrne has been invited to compete in previous US championships but this was the first year his schedule permitted him to enter.
Top-ranking players are invited to compete. The current tourney has all but one of the country's leading players.

VU Professor In U.S. Chess Championships

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 44

Fischer Improves Lead In U.S. Chess
15-Year-Old Defender Beats Weinstein in 58 Moves—Reshevsky Plays Draw

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old defender, increased his lead last night in the United States chess championship for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy.
Fischer won his adjourned fourth-round game with Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn College in fifty-eight moves at the Manhattan Chess club. With eight rounds completed, Fischer had a score of 6—2 and was undefeated.

TITLE OF ARTICLE

Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 46

Chess Whiz Whizzes On
NEW YORK, (AP)—Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn's teen-age whiz kid, moved into first place in the National Chess Championships last night when he drew with Don Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., in 48 moves.
The half-point he gained enabled him to inch ahead of Larry Evans of New York. Bobby now has 4½ points to 4 for Evans. They will go on to the title.
There were two other draws in the night's action. Charles Kalme of Philadelphia and William Lombardi of New York finished in a deadlock in 38 moves and Ray Weinstein of Brooklyn and Arthur Bisguier of New York finished even in 56 moves.

Chess Whiz Whizzes On

The Ottawa Citizen Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 16

Bobby Fischer Bolsters Lead
New York (CP) — Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old American titleholder from New York, bolstered his lead in the United States chess championship by defeating Raymond Weinstein of New York Monday. This gave Fischer a 6-2 record. He is undefeated so far but has drawn four matches.

Bobby Fischer Bolsters Lead

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 31, 1958 - Page 20

Fischer Defeats Mednis In Chess
Brooklyn Player Triumphs in 37 Moves in 9th Round of U.S. Championship

With one important exception, the leaders in the United States championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy won in the ninth round at the Manhattan Chess Club last night.
At the close of the five-hour session, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 15-year-old titleholder, still led, with a score of 7-2, after defeating Edmar Mednis, N.Y.U., in thirty-seven moves.
Two of his chief rivals, Larry Evans and Samuel Reshevsky, former champions, turned in a victory apiece, to tie at 6-3, a full point behind the youngster, with two rounds to go.

Fischer Defeats Mednis In Chess

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1958 “Bobby Fischer Chess” Articles

January 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, January 01, 1958 - Page 34, “Reshevsky Held To Draw In Chess”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 02, 1958 - Page 4, “Lead Shared With Sam Reshevsky by Bobby Fischer, National Open Champion”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, January 02, 1958 - Page 40, “Reshevsky Takes U.S. Chess Lead”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, January 03, 1958 - Page 18, “Reshevsky Lags In Chess Contest—Fischer and Lombardy in Keen Match”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, January 04, 1958 - Page 13, “Fischer Regains Title Chess Lead”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 70, “Fischer Sets Pace In U.S. Championship”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 116, “Chess Battle Royal Will End on Tuesday”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 05, 1958 - Page 3, “Fischer Adjourns Di Camillo Game”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, January 06, 1958 - Page 32, “Reshevsky Beats Kramer In Chess”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, January 07, 1958 - Page 82, “Reshevsky Loses Game To Sherwin: Bows for First Time in U.S. Chess, Enabling Fischer to Take Tourney Lead”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, January 08, 1958 - Page 93, “Fischer Annexes U.S. Chess Title”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 09, 1958 - Page 19, “14-Year-Old Wizard Wins National Title”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Ukiah Daily Journal, Ukiah, California, Friday, January 10, 1958 - Page 2, “Gangling 14-Year Old Surprises: Boy Upsets International Grandmaster in Chess Play”

  14. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday, January 11, 1958 - Page 14, “14-Year-Old Champ”

  15. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Edmonton Journal Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Saturday, January 11, 1958 - Page 27, “14-Year-Old Chess Champion”

  16. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 12, 1958 - Page 74, “Bobby Fischer Wins U.S. Championship”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 16, 1958 - Page 16, “Bobby Fischer Leads Free World Players”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 16, 1958 - Page 4, “Fischer's Success”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, January 19, 1958 - Page 42, “U.S. Championship”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Sunday, January 19, 1958 - Page 63, “Newsweek East-West Struggle”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Evening Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Monday, January 20, 1958 - Page 16, “Champion At 14”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Wednesday, January 22, 1958 - Page 41 , “Boy Chess Champ From Brooklyn”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Saturday, January 25, 1958 - Page 7, “Bobby Fischer Learning to Ski With Toni Kastner”

  24. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, January 26, 1958 - Page 51, “Bobby Fischer Wins U.S. Championship Without Loss of a Game”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 26, 1958 - Page 70, “U.S. Championship Notes”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 26, 1958 - Page 10, “Rosenwald Tournament”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Thursday, January 30, 1958 - Page 35, “The Champ Bobby Fischer”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 30, 1958 - Page 2, “Fischer-Mednis”

February 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, February 02, 1958 - Page 17, “Bobby Fischer, 14-year-old chess genius Wins U.S. Chess Championship”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, February 06, 1958 - Page 37, “Brilliancy Prize Goes to Fischer For Game Won From James T. Sherwin”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, February 09, 1958 - Page 38, “Fischer Ski Enthusiast”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (2) (Image) The Observer, London, Greater London, England, Sunday, February 09, 1958 - Page 5, “Chess: The New Generation”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 13, 1958 - Page 11, “Bobby Fischer's Triumph Over Samuel Reshevsky”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Altoona Mirror, Altoona, Pennsylvania, Friday, February 14, 1958 - Page 7, “All About The Game of Chess”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, February 15, 1958 - Page 24, “Fischer Beats 24 In Chess”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, February 16, 1958 - Page 36, “Fischer vs. Mednis, Pirc Defense”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Sunday, February 16, 1958 - Page 1, “Fischer Chess Champ At 14”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 20, 1958 - Page 11, “Bobby Fischer vs. Arthur Bisguier”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, February 23, 1958 - Page 58, “Reshevsky Loses Twice”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) (Image) (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, February 23, 1958 - Pages 241, 261, 263, “Fourteen-Year-Old 'Mozart of Chess'; Called the greatest natural player the game has ever known, national champion Bobby Fischer will first lose his adenoids and then seek the world title.”

March 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Sunday, March 09, 1958 - Page 18, “East Lansing Youth, 16, Seeks City Chess Honors”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, March 23, 1958 - Page 229, “Big Soviet Entry Slated in Chess”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, March 23, 1958 - Page 66, “Latest On Bobby Fischer”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, March 23, 1958 - Page 226, “Foundation Awards Made”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, March 27, 1958 - Page 6, “Will Reshevsky or Fischer Compete?”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, March 30, 1958 - Page 41, “Young U.S. Titlist Likes To Ski, Too”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, March 30, 1958 - Page 12, “Youthful U.S. Champion In Chess to Meet Reds For Competition”

April 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Edmonton Journal Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Monday, April 07, 1958 - Page 21, “U.S. Chess Prodigy May Win Crown”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Herald Dayton, Ohio Monday, April 07, 1958 - Page 4, “A Game For Youth, Too”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Friday, April 11, 1958 - Page 28, “U.S. Can't Send Chess Entrants”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, April 13, 1958 - Page 40, “International Mastership”
  5. (Indirect mention) () () The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Sunday, April 13, 1958 - Page 241, “Chess Anyone?” An article on collection of chess pieces.
  6. (Vague Mention) () Dayton Daily News Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, April 15, 1958 - 8, “True or False? U.S. Champion too young to get driver's license?”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 17, 1958 - Page 5, “California Artist Promised 15-Year-Old Chess Champion a, Out of this World Set of Chessmen”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Simpson's Leader-Times, Kittanning, Pennsylvania, Thursday, April 17, 1958 - Page 22, “Young Pianist, Chess Player Are International Sensations”

  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, April 20, 1958 - Page 2B, “Chadwick Club Plans Chess Play”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Pampa Daily News, Pampa, Texas, Wednesday, April 23, 1958 - Page 10, “Learning a New Move”

May 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, May 08, 1958 - Page 10, “Bobby Fischer Simultaneous Exhibition, Up to 25 Boards at Jewish Community Center”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-News, Bridgewater, New Jersey, Saturday, May 10, 1958 - Page 6, “Bobby Fischer, Televised Simultaneous Exhibition”

  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 12, 1958 - Page 50, “New WNTA Gambit”
  4. (Indirect Mention) () () The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Saturday, May 10, 1958 - Page 3, “Botvinnik Regains World Chess Championship”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, May 11, 1958 - Page 124, “American Chess Foundation Plea for Funds”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, May 11, 1958 - Page 87, “Candidates Tournament Field of Competition”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, May 22, 1958 - Page 40, “Russian Chess Prodigy Told to Wait Till He's 8”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 25, 1958 - Page 73, “Fischer, Reshevsky In Line for Interzonal”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, May 25, 1958 - Page 38, “Bobby Fischer, 14, wins Rosenwald, giving him U.S. Triple Crown”
  10. (Indirect Mention) () Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, May 25, 1958 - Page 46, “To this tournament Bobby Fischer and Samuel Reshevsky will represent the United States.”

June 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, June 01, 1958 - Page 27, “Results of televised simultaneous match”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, June 01, 1958 - Page 37, “New Russian Prodigy”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, June 08, 1958 - Page 59, “Bobby Fischer to Russia”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Emporia Gazette, Emporia, Kansas, Tuesday, June 10, 1958 - Page 2, “Fischer in Moscow and Political Climate: Russian Chess Players, Khruschev and Cold War Sentiments”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 15, 1958 - Page 208, “Fischer to Leave for Russia”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, June 18, 1958 - Page 31, “Boy Chess Champion Flying To Russia”

  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, June 18, 1958 - Page 46, “Fischer Flies Abroad”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 22, 1958 - Page 178, “Yugoslav Will Second Fischer in Title Chess”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, June 23, 1958 - Page 11, “Fischer to Have Master as Second”

  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Thursday, June 26, 1958 - Page 45, “Chess Champ Tours”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) Eau Claire Leader, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Friday, June 27, 1958 - Page 8, “U.S. Chess Champ”

  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 32, “Visa Woes Face Yank At Russ Chess Meet”

  13. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 165, “Bobby Fischer a Hit in Soviet Chess, Though He Made First Move Too Fast”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, June 29, 1958 - Page 23, “Young American Chess Whiz Hits Moscow Snag”

July 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Tuesday, July 01, 1958 - Page 34, “Capitalistic War Monger's Espionage Opening”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, Wednesday, July 02, 1958 - Page 29, “Situation wanted: A postcard from Mrs. Regina Fischer”
  3. (Indirect mention of Bobby Fischer) () Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 03, 1958 - Page 13, “Chess with Sam Laird”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 06, 1958 - Page 66, “Fischer in Moscow”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, July 06, 1958 - Page 57, “U.S. Chess Wizard Bobby Fischer in Van Cliburn Fashion”

  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Thursday, July 10, 1958 - Page 26, “Chess Champ Abroad”

  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, July 13, 1958 - Page 169, “Fischer in Belgrade Draw”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Sunday, July 13, 1958 - Page 64, “U.S. Chess Wizard Visits Yugoslavia”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 28, “Brooklynite Gains Junior Chess Title”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 10, “Chess Wizards Draw”

  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Monday, July 14, 1958 - Page 7, “Experts In Draw”

  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Democrat and Chronicle, Rochester, New York, Tuesday, July 15, 1958 - Page 29, “Regina Fischer Eligible Contestant on Television Show”

  13. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 17, 1958 - Page 18, “Bobby Fischer On Tour in Europe”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, July 20, 1958 - Page 88, “U.S. Olympic Chess Team Selection”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, July 20, 1958 - Page 62, “Weinstein Wins Junior Title; Remlinger Close”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 24, 1958 - Page 6, “Bobby Fischer Arrives in Yugoslavia”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, July 31, 1958 - Page 14, “Bobby Fischer Contemporary Competitors”

August 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, August 01, 1958 - Page 5, “What Price Child Prodigy? Is the Question”
  2. (Indirect mention) () Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 03, 1958 - Page 71, “Bobby Fischer and Sherwin will represent United States”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, August 03, 1958 - Page 29, “The Spirit of Morphy”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Logan Daily News, Logan, Ohio, Monday, August 04, 1958 - Page 2, “U.S. Boy, 15, Seeks World Chess Crown”

  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 06, 1958 - Page 28, “Fischer Plays Draw In Yugoslav Chess”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Wednesday, August 06, 1958 - Page 18, “U.S. Chess Open Now in Progress”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 07, 1958 - Page 32, “Tal Defeats Szabo In Yugoslav Chess”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, August 07, 1958 - Page 6, “A Touch of Drama: Fischer vs. Tal”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 08, 1958 - Page 12, “Tal In First Place”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Friday, August 08, 1958 - Page 31, “American Chess Player Tied For Second In Meet”

  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 09, 1958 - Page 19, “Bobby Fischer Adjourns after 42 Moves with Hector Rossetto of Buenos Aires”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 10, 1958 - Page 65, “Fischer, Sherwin In Interzonal Chess”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, August 10, 1958 - Page 32, “Bobby Fischer in Europe, Will Not Defend Title”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, August 11, 1958 - Page 26, “Fischer, Sherwin Set Back In Chess”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, August 12, 1958 - Page 38, “Fischer Gets Draw In Interzonal Chess”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 13, 1958 - Page 35, “Russians Keep Lead”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 33, “Fischer Near Draw In Bronstein Match”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 38, “Bobby Fischer at Interzonal, Portoroz, Yugoslavia”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Lincoln Star, Lincoln, Nebraska, Thursday, August 14, 1958 - Page 21, “Chess Round Ends”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 26, “Fischer, Bronstein Deadlock In Chess”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 7, “Fierce Chess Encounters at Portoroz Meet”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Friday, August 15, 1958 - Page 29, “Youth Draws Bronstein in Chess Match”

  23. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 16, 1958 - Page 14, “Fischer, Auerbach Draw In 31 Moves”
  24. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 52, “Bobby Fischer Difficulties with Fans and Newsmen”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 197, “Fischer Off Form In Debut Abroad: But U.S. Champion, 15, Holds Own in Yugoslav Chess”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 197, “Fischer Defeats Larsen In Chess”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 197, “Chess Champion Receives Praise”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 34, “A Bashful Chess Whiz's Exit Fizzes”

  29. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 36, “International Chess”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 18, “Fine Exhibition”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Sunday, August 17, 1958 - Page 8, “Who Won?”
  32. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 32, “Fischer Wins Again In Interzone Chess”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Atlanta Constitution Atlanta, Georgia Wednesday, August 20, 1958 - Page 13, “Fischer Wins Chess Title”

  34. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 28, “Tal Takes Chess Lead”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 10, “Young Chess Wizard Trails Soviet Player”

  36. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 21, 1958 - Page 34, “Bobby Fischer Doing Extremely Well with 4-3 Score”
  37. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, August 22, 1958 - Page 3, “Petrosian leading in interzonal chess tournament”
  38. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 23, 1958, “Sherwin Triumphs, Fischer Adjourns”
  39. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Saturday, August 23, 1958 - Page 28, “Bobby Fischer and Fridrick Olafsson Adjourn”
  40. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 222, “Fischer Adjourns, Shunning A Draw”
  41. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 7, “Yank Youth, Soviet Halt Chess Match”

  42. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 30, “Bobby Fischer, 15-Year-Old U.S. Champion Improves Standing with Victory over Bent Larsen”
  43. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 58, “Fischer Bronstein Draw”
  44. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, August 24, 1958 - Page 49, “Bobby Fischer Not Competing in 1958 U.S. Open at Rochester, Minn.”
  45. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, August 25, 1958, “Fischer, Russian Play Chess Draw”
  46. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Monday, August 25, 1958 - Page 7, “New Yorker, 15, Defeats Soviet Chess Champion”
  47. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Tuesday, August 26, 1958 - Page 10, “American Boy Beats Russian Chess Champ”

  48. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 28, 1958 - Page 24, “Fischer, Russian Adjourn In Chess”

  49. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, August 28, 1958 - Page 24, “15-year-old U.S. champion scored perhaps his finest victory yet”
  50. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, August 29, 1958 - Page 26, “Tal And Auerbach Draw In 19 Moves”
  51. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, August 30, 1958 - Page 09, “Petrosian Leads Interzonal Chess: Draws With Bronstein and Fischer to Overtake Tal—Sherwin in Deadlock”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Saturday, August 30, 1958 - Page 12, “Chess Youth Surprises”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 136, “Tal Beats Larsen In 24-Move Match”
  54. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 136, “Six Will Qualify For Chess Event: Conditions Are Modified for Challengers' Tourney to Be Held in 1959”
  55. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 43, “Fischer In Belgrade”
  56. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 3, “Yankee Boy Moves Up in Chess Tourney”
  57. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 28, “U.S. Chess Star Wins Tourney Trial Match”
  58. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 63, “Bobby Fischer Completes Drawn Game with Mikhail Tal”
  59. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 6, “U.S. Boy, 15, Gains In Try at Chess Title”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, August 31, 1958 - Page 24, “Out On A Limb With Great Tournament Predictions: Fischer in Yugoslavia”

September 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Monday, September 01, 1958 - Page 2, “Yankee Gains Half-Point in Chess Tourney”

  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 01, 1958, “Fischer Draws with Laszlo Szabo in 33 moves”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 31, “Fischer Triumphs In 90-Move Game”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 18, “Fischer Gains on Chess Leaders”

  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Evening Review, East Liverpool, Ohio, Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 4, “Atonement”

  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Tuesday, September 02, 1958 - Page 37, “Who Won? Bobby Fischer vs. James Sherwin of New York”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 04, 1958 - Page 26, “Tal, Panno Adjourn In Interzone Chess: Fischer Draws with Ludek Pachman”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 04, 1958 - Page 38, “Bobby Fischer continues to make headlines at Portoroz”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 05, 1958 - Page 30, “Petrosian Draws, Takes Chess Lead: Bobby Fischer, 36 Moves”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, September 05, 1958 - Page 48, “Bobby Fischer Draws with Aleksander Matanovic of Yugoslavia”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 06, 1958 - Page 13, “Tal Wins a Match Then Plays Draw To Lead in Chess”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 277, “Fischer Retains Hopes of Gaining”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 277, “Fischer, Filip Draw In International Chess”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 65, “Tal Leads Interzonal Chess; Fischer Gains”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () () (Image) San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 78, “Championship Chess: Halfway through Tournament, Prospect on Fischer vs. Tal”

  16. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 07, 1958 - Page 59, “1958 Interzonal in Yugoslavia: Bobby Fischer's Score 7.5”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 08, 1958 - Page 35, “Gligoric Advances In Portoroz Chess: Bobby Fischer Adjourns After 41 Moves with Cardoso”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 09, 1958 - Page 44, “Fischer Bolsters Tourney Position”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 46, “Fischer Finishes With 12-8 Record: Brooklyn Boy 5th in Chess Tourney Which Winds Up Tonight in Yugoslavia”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 46, “Yugoslavs Lionize Fischer, U.S. Chess Prodigy: Brooklyn Youth, 15, Is Called Genius by Official”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 7, “Fischer's Qualification Hinges on Final Round”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 27, “Russian Is Top Man in Chess Meet”

  23. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Thursday, September 11, 1958 - Page 15, “Sports In Brief: Bobby Fischer Sure Bet To Remain In Running For Next Year's Tournament of Candidates”

  24. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 29, “Fischer, 15, Gets Top Chess Status: Brooklyn Player Is Youngest to Become International Grand Master”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Berkshire Eagle, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 12, “Bobby Fischer, 15, Chess Grand Master”

  26. (Opinion Piece) () The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 13, “Sports”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 4, “Brilliant Success: U.S. Chess Whiz, 15, Is Made Grand Master”

  28. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Friday, September 12, 1958 - Page 2, “Portoroz Chess Tournament Ends: Benko, Fischer, and Olafsson Qualify”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 174, “A Cheer for Bobby Fischer”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 10, “Dough Checks Chess Whiz, 15”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 237, “Fischer Will Face Russians In Chess: Brooklyn Boy to Play Keres and Smyslov Next Year in Challengers' Tourney”
  32. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 14, 1958, “Boy Chess Expert Delayed Abroad”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 88, “Whiz Kid at Chessboard: But Bobby, 15, Finds Books Baffling”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 74, “Bobby Fischer, United States champion, is in a triple tie”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 14, 1958 - Page 28, “Bobby Fischer must win two remaining games to qualify for candidates tournament”

  36. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, September 15, 1958 - Page 55, “Young Chess Grand Master Goes To Zurich”

  37. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 15, 1958 - Page 29, “Boy Chess Ace Due At Idlewild Today”
  38. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 29, “Bobby Fischer, Chess Hero, Back To Realities of Brooklyn Home: International Master Finds He's Just an Unusual Boy of 15 in His Own City”
  39. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 1, “Has Eye on World Title—Yankee Chess Whiz-Kid Begins His Training a Year in Advance”

  40. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 19, “American Chess Ace, 15, Returns To Books”

  41. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 10, “Cheers for Bobby Fischer”
  42. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Daily News New York, New York Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 163, “Chess Whiz, 15, Returns Triumphant but Skinny”
  43. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Tuesday, September 16, 1958 - Page 12, “Back To School”

  44. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Edmonton Journal Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Wednesday, September 17, 1958 - Page 43, “Chess Whiz, 15, Starts Training”
  45. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Public Opinion Chambersburg, Pennsylvania Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 24, “Bobby Fischer, Grand Master”
  46. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 32, “Chess With Sam Laird: Fine Playing of Youth Big Story of Week”
  47. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 10, “Bobby and Eddie”
  48. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 20, “In His Own Country…”
  49. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, September 18, 1958 - Page 4, “Bobby Fischer and Mikhail Tal in Interzonal Tournament”
  50. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 19, 1958 - Page 30, “Bobby Fischer Hailed: Grandmaster, 15, Gets Watch at Marshall Chess Club”
  51. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 61, “Fischer Places, Made Grandmaster”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 4, “Fischer...would play only the best? Petrosian is 'small fry'?”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 42, “Fischer Qualifies”

  54. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 74, “Bobby Fischer, The Brooklyn Boy of Chess Awarded Title of International Grandmaster”
  55. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, September 21, 1958 - Page 38, “Fischer Is Back”
  56. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, September 22, 1958 - Page 6, “Sputnik From Brooklyn”
  57. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Index-Journal, Greenwood, South Carolina, Monday, September 22, 1958 - Page 2, “Chess 'N Jeans”

  58. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Ithaca Journal, Ithaca, New York, Thursday, October 09, 1958 - Page 6, “When did Bobby Fischer become the chess champion of the United States?”

  59. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 273, “Eight Will Play In World Chess: Mednis and Fischer Tie”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 25, “Fischer vs. Larsen at Portoroz”
  61. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) (2) () (Image) San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 76, “Championship Chess: Bobby Fischer, 15, tied for fifth in Portoroz Interzonal”

  62. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, September 28, 1958 - Page 40, “Bobby Fischer Finishes Sixth in Tournament”

  63. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Age, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, Tuesday, September 30, 1958 - Page 12, “Chess Wonder Boy of U.S.”

October 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, October 02, 1958 - Page 18, “Six of America's Best Chess Players Excluding Bobby Fischer, Participating in International Team Championship at Munich”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (2) (3) (Image) San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, October 05, 1958 - Page 84, “Bobby Fischer, ‘Dangerous Antagonist’ at 13 Years Old”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Ithaca Journal, Ithaca, New York, Thursday, October 09, 1958 - Page 6, “When did Bobby Fischer become the chess champion of the United States?”

  4. (Headliner Preview) () Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Friday, October 10, 1958 - Page 1, “For your Sunday Reading”
  5. (Indirect mention) () The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 41, “In all the fanfare surrounding Bobby Fischer's remarkable play at Portoroz everyone seems to have overlooked the sterling action of James Sherwin. Sherwin, no graybearded gaffer, was awarded the title of international grandmaster for his achievement…”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () () (Image) Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, October 12, 1958 - Page 53, “Pawn My Word!, Chess Whiz Fischer, 15, Out to Be World Champ”

  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Dispatch, Moline, Illinois, Thursday, October 16, 1958 - Page 6, “Genius and Joy”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 25, “Bobby Fischer Has Chess Experts Agog”

  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) San Antonio Express, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, October 19, 1958 - Page 92, “Championship Chess: Fischer Versus Dallas, Texas' Fred Tears”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Sydney Morning Herald, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, Sunday, October 26, 1958 - Page 89, “Bobby Fischer Proves Himself Against The World's Best”
  11. (Chess Is Great Method to Improve Mind) () () The Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Vermont, Wednesday, October 29, 1958 - Page 41, “Misogynist Chess Player, Philip Kolvoord”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) News-Record Neenah, Wisconsin Friday, October 31, 1958 - Page 4, “Roving Reporter: Fischer's Financial Means to Participate in Yugoslav Tourney”

November 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, November 02, 1958 - Page 64, “Leaves of Chess”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Ottawa Citizen Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Monday, November 03, 1958 - Page 6, “Sports Of Two Continents”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Winona Daily News, Winona, Minnesota, Monday, November 03, 1958 - Page 12, “Bobby Fischer Described as Average Teen”

  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, November 09, 1958 - Page 72, “Soviets fail to overwhelm all competition”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Sunday, November 09, 1958 - Page 15, “Junior High Crowd Can Find Plenty of Good Reading”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, November 16, 1958 - Page 78, “Astonishing Triumph of 15-Year-Old Bobby Fischer”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, November 20, 1958 - Page 6, “Bobby Fischer vs Tal in Future Battle for Title Held by Botvinnik”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, November 23, 1958 - Page 38, “Bobby Fischer Finishes Sixth”

  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Daily Oklahoman Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Sunday, November 23, 1958 - Page 156, “Checkmated at the Chess Table”

December 1958

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Marion Star, Marion, Ohio, Thursday, December 04, 1958 - Page 40, “Chess Champ Gives Mother New Worries”

  2. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 04, 1958 - Page 56, “Reshevsky In Chess: Fischer Also in U.S. Tourney Starting Here on Dec. 18”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 119, “Candidates Tournament”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 07, 1958 - Page 42, “Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old grandmaster from Brooklyn and current titleholder, will attempt to repeat his triumph of a year ago.”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 14, 1958 - Page 55, “Bobby Fischer and Paul Benko at Munich”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Wednesday, December 17, 1958 - Page 3, “Olaffson To Play At Hastings”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, December 18, 1958 - Page 6, “Bobby Fischer to Defend Crown at Tournament”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Friday, December 19, 1958 - Page 50, “Grandmaster Bobby Fischer and William Lombardy Adjourn After 43 Moves”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Boston Globe Boston, Massachusetts Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 26, “Formidable List at Lessing J. Rosenwald Tournament”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 26, “Evans Wins; Leads U.S. Chess Meet”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 24, “Evans Wins To Take Chess Tourney Lead”

  12. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, December 21, 1958 - Page 32, “Twelve Masters Vie In Championship Meet”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Monday, December 22, 1958 - Page 38, “Evans Leads Chess Meet In Tourney at New York”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Tuesday, December 23, 1958 - Page 28, “Evans Loses 1st Chess Match”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, December 24, 1958 - Page 23, “3-Way Tie In Chess Play”

  16. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 48, “Boy, 15, Beats America's Ace Chess Player”

  17. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 39, “15-Year-Old Fischer Leads Chess Tourney”

  18. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Eugene Guard, Eugene, Oregon, Thursday, December 25, 1958 - Page 33, “Chess Whiz Wins”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, December 26, 1958 - Page 18, “Fischer Beats Reschevsky, Leads Chess”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 74, “Evans and Fischer Lead in Title Play”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 30, “Fischer, 15, Holds Lead in U.S. Chess”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 28, “U.S. Chess Championship”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Sunday, December 28, 1958 - Page 15, “Chess Stalemate”

  24. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 14, “Young American Chess Player Still in First”

  25. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 26, “Fischer In Front In Chess Tourney”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Battle Creek Enquirer, Battle Creek, Michigan, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 4, “Olivet Player Ties Leader In 40 Chess Moves”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 60, “Bobby Fischer Continues in First Place”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 9, “Chess Champion Increases Lead”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, December 29, 1958 - Page 2, “Bobby Fischer Strengthens Hold on First Place”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 44, “Fischer Improves Lead In U.S. Chess: 15-Year-Old Defender Beats Weinstein in 58 Moves—Reshevsky Plays Draw”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Vidette-Messenger of Porter County, Valparaiso, Indiana, Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 7, “VU Professor In U.S. Chess Championships”
  32. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 46, “Chess Whiz Whizzes On”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) The Ottawa Citizen Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Tuesday, December 30, 1958 - Page 16, “Bobby Fischer Bolsters Lead”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1958 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 31, 1958 - Page 20, “Fischer Defeats Mednis In Chess: Brooklyn Player Triumphs in 37 Moves in 9th Round of U.S. Championship”
Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess
“Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess”

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“Chess Fundamentals”

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“My 60 Memorable Games”

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“Morphy's Games of Chess”

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